Woman denied entry into USA after CBP accesses medical records

Discussion in 'Travel Security' started by mre5765, Nov 28, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. mre5765

    mre5765 Silver Member

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  2. icurhere2
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    icurhere2 Gold Member

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    Not saying the agent (or the regulation) is in the right, but as one of the commenters pointed out, the traveler has written a book about her past issues. Essentially, there's a decent probability Canadian medical records were never consulted.
     
  3. marcwint55

    marcwint55 Gold Member

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    While there is probably no perfect solution, I would rather have the government err on the side of caution.
     
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  4. LETTERBOY
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    LETTERBOY Gold Member

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    I'm wondering if there's anything more to this story. Maybe the CBP officer thought she might try to kill herself on US soil? :confused: With the number of people in the world who have mental illnesses, you'd have to think the US allows a good number of them in.
     
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  5. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

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    I could understand some worry but it's not like she tried to enter on a whim -- she had cruise tickets and even a string of lights for her cabin. Doesn't sound like the behavior of a suicidal person (to me, anyhow ;))..
     
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  6. zphelj

    zphelj Gold Member

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    This is one of those stories that makes me go 'Hmm.'
    • I submit we could easily demonstrate that CBP doesn't stop any significant number of people based on some fear they might do something crazy and that many people they have admitted have actually gone and done crazy things. Applying that rule in this case may be somewhat random or not, no telling.
    • It seems clear that the giant data vacuum that the NSA has become is sharing information easily and often with all sorts of government agencies. Given CBP's role it seems impossible that they don't have access to it. So I'd assume they could have access to all that.
    • Access to doesn't mean accessing though and it's kind of amazing to me that the system is smart enough to correlate either her medical information or the contents of a book and flag her as someone to deny entry because she might be nuts. That makes me lean more toward her medical file being the key because things like diagnosis are coded and would be a lot easier for a computer to digest and use than a book.
    • I think it's been reported that when NSA shares data they really like to make sure it's possible to claim it came from a second source that is viewed more positively than warrant-less data acquisition. That book is probably going to make a great out regardless.
    • I don't think your average CBP agent has any significant training in psychiatry and are not likely to be very good at making the call between sane and crazy during a CBP interview other than the obvious. This woman doesn't sound like someone I'd flag as obviously crazy under these circumstances which makes me think there's something in her file that says 'deny entry in this fashion'.
    • If we denied everyone based on that sort of thing a lot of people would be stuck at home. Denying people entry because of a past medical issue is pretty lame in my book however that seems hard to believe here because I'd think it would be a whole lot more common if done en-mass via some automated system.
    • Given all this I'd sure think there's more to this story as other's have suggested.
     
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  7. mre5765

    mre5765 Silver Member

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    Pretty sure the book was written before the incident the CBP referenced.
     
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  8. mre5765

    mre5765 Silver Member

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    Caution with regard to what?

    Besides which, the point is how did CBP get her medical records?
     
  9. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    Who knows if they did. Once she writes a book on her situation, it is tough to play the privacy card.

    Further...lots of countries deny entry for a wide variety of reasons. Many pacrim countries make you walk in front of a temperature scanning camera. I've heard of kiwis confiscating goods that had too much soil on them. Jews generally shouldn't turn up in KSA.

    There are no rights afforded to foreigners seeking entry to any country. You can be searched or denied entry pretty much unilaterally if you aren't a citizen in the US or any country. (Not sure how permanent resident status is treated.)

    While this denial may or may not have been undue, once the book is factored in, perhaps she was on a watch list already? She certainly had no/few "secrets" one she released her story to the public domain. Perhaps the pax made a scene...as luck would have it, perhaps it will generate more book sales.
     
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  10. icurhere2
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    icurhere2 Gold Member

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    Her website conveniently lists a revised edition coming up.
     
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  11. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    Well timed. :)
     
  12. marcwint55

    marcwint55 Gold Member

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  13. zphelj

    zphelj Gold Member

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    Apparently the CBP agent cited a 2012 incident, not the 2009 book. It also appears Canadian's sometimes place information regarding mental health into police records which CBP does have access to already so there is speculation the source of the information was not her medical records.
     
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  14. icurhere2
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    icurhere2 Gold Member

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    Not even that - the police apparently responded to the 2012 incident, so the information was in the police record by default.
     

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