Wired writers apple, google, twitter accts easily hacked and wiped

Discussion in 'Travel Technology' started by Gargoyle, Aug 11, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. Gargoyle
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    Gargoyle Milepoint Guide

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    How Apple and Amazon Security Flaws Led to My Epic Hacking

    A couple phone calls to Amazon and the hackers got control of that account, and from there were able to easily take over his apple and twitter accounts; they then wiped everything off his macbook, iPhone, iPad, and iCloud including all photos of his 1-1/2 year old daughter. He didn't have physical backups, it was all on apples.

    Apple and Amazon, and probably the other major players have very porous identity verification systems.
     
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  2. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    Not a good idea for a variety of reasons to not have backups of the laptop data. Time machine, anyone?
     
  3. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    Apple and Amazon didn't lead to this. The guy screwing up did.
     
  4. adambadam
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    adambadam Silver Member

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    This is called social engineering. No one screwed up per se, but the incident exposed many vulnerabilities in a flawed system. The simple truth is that failsafes for passwords are too easy to figure out an in many cases have not progressed in complexity at the same rate as sites have required passwords to do (Facebook might be an exception as i have seen some interesting ways they confirm your identity). Things like maiden names are no longer very secretive, people post public information about their pets names that anyone can Google etc. I don't have a solution the problem, but it raises many questions about how much information different service providers (gmail, Amazon, Apple, Facebook) should know about us in order to be able to confirm our identity when situations like this arise.
     
  5. emajy
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    emajy Silver Member

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    This could have happened to anyone. It is the system and the author has stated that he should have had backups.
     

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