Why no one was sucked out of a Southwest Airlines Jet

Discussion in 'Blogstand' started by sobore, Apr 6, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42434710/ns/travel-news/

    A five-square-foot hole opened in the roof of a Southwest Airlines jet as it was cruising at 36,000 feet on Friday afternoon. Passengers reported hearing an explosive noise and feeling "air being sucked out" of the cabin, but the pilot was able to land the plane safely and there were no major injuries. Why wasn't anyone blown through the hole?
    Seat belts and safe distance. As the Explainer described six years ago, the phenomenon of explosive decompression is very real: People and objects can indeed be forced out of an airliner at cruising altitude when a large hole opens in its fuselage.
     
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  2. milchap
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    milchap Gold Member

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    Good article. Thanks for an informative read.
     

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