Why is the fuel surcharge more for a First vs. World Traveller Award?

Discussion in 'British Airways | Executive Club' started by Infinite1K, Apr 8, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. Infinite1K
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    Infinite1K Silver Member

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    I realize that if you fly into/out of UK airports, you are subject to the premium cabin taxes they levy, though you can avoid those fees if you are just connecting.

    However it appears that the fuel surcharge that BA is charging on awards is a few hundred dollars more when flying in Club World/First instead of World Traveller.

    Is this a bug with the BA website or is there another explanation for this delta?

    FWIW, the BA website describes the Fuel Surcharge as the following and no mention is made of class of service as being a factor (bolding mine):

     
  2. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    They do charge more for the YQ on a revenue ticket in F, too. Looking just now it is GBP 159.5 one way LHR-JFK for J or F fares. It is GBP 106.5 for a Y or W fare.
     
  3. EZEIZA
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    Because your backside takes up more space in F than it does in Y.
     
  4. philatravelgirl

    philatravelgirl Silver Member

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    I believe that the whole "green" environmental issue comes into play as well in the UK so that the fuel charges will differ by classes
     
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  5. Infinite1K
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    Yup. I know they charge more. Trying to understand the rationale, since their description does not flag the cabin as being a factor.
     
  6. trooper
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    First class seat etc weighs more therefeore takes more fuel to carry?

    That would make some kind of sense.....
     
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  7. Infinite1K
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    That does make sense. As would the extra "free baggage" allowance you get in F. Still wish BA was more transparent with their fees :(
     
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  8. redtailshark

    redtailshark Silver Member

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    First, the reason for this discrepancy is well known.

    It is that BA is Dilbertian. Yes, I said "Dilbertian." The BA apologists know what I mean.

    Next, nobody debates the Avios redemption taxes that masquerade as YQ and other sundries are usurious in these cases. I was quoted 489 USD for a one-way from LHR to IAD in W. I was able to mildly subvert this by originating in BRU, connecting at LHR and headed on, with a sub-24 hour layover in the UK yielding 286 USD in tax for the same award (BRU-LHR in Y however). Taxes would have been the same in J according to BA.COM but under the new points model, with the extra sector from BRU I didn't quite have enough Avios to go around.

    OTOH I was able to redeem on QF from SYD to MEL for 12 USD in tax and 4500 Avios. A genuinely good deal. Especially when compared with the *best in class* DL SM demands of hundreds of thousands.
     
  9. Prospero
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    The progressive YQ rates were introduced In 2008. The reason given at the time was the higher charges levied on premium class tickets reflected the higher associated cost delivering the service.
     
  10. Globaliser
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    This is the essence of it:-
    The non-Y passenger is associated with more "real estate" on board and therefore more of the aircraft weight and therefore more of the fuel used.
     
  11. Wandering Aramean
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    Indeed, it is. But it has nothing to do with the mini-rant you've posted that is pretty much OT for this entire discussion. Thanks for playing though.

    FWIW, it isn't only BA that charges a higher YQ for premium cabin travel, so saying that it is specific to them is quite off-base. VS, UA and DL do it, too.
     
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  12. effseeoh

    effseeoh Gold Member

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    redtail has it exactly right. Imagine that a plane charges a total YQ of $100K for example. You could fill this plane with 500 dilberts in a Y-only plane and they'd pay $200 each, or you could fill it with 100 J-only dilberts and they'd have to pay $1000 each to make up the total YQ quota for the plane. Hence the well-known dilbertian policy of BA. Hope that helps anyone understand redtail's analogies.
     
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  13. EZEIZA
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    British Airways = one of the most successful airlines flying.

    Tells its own story....no matter what crap gets posted on here.
     
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  14. PanAm
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    Well that certainly explains YQ allocation better than the other posters!
     
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  15. redtailshark

    redtailshark Silver Member

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    You're welcome. And hey, I get to play again.

    True that OALs impose significant "YQ" and other nonsense e.g. the reviled "IOS", however, the magnitude of the BA "YQ" is beyond compare. Even redeeming using the *best in class* SM ex-EU [whenever that's actually possible using DL.COM] incurs lower total tax on this trip than BA offers. And except for the hated APD in the case of the UK, the DL taxes are very similar for J vs. Y.

    I will say, at least the BA award tool appeared to book what I requested without too much fuss. A small victory for an entity with real CS, but a large one in the competitive Dilbertian universe that BA inhabits.
     
  16. EZEIZA
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    BA are making a profit when others falter.....one carrier has even had to cower behind some grossly unfair protection scheme.
    And it's not that long ago you said the well run AF/KLM would be acquiring BA. Don't think AF/KLM have made a profit since that prediction. :D
     
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  17. redtailshark

    redtailshark Silver Member

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    It is true that things have changed somewhat.

    I agree there has been some reversion and that things aren't as dire now. BA is not exactly the most prosperous entity but it's not now in imminent danger of being asset-stripped for the AFKL Musee d'Orsay.

    But only recently, that wasn't the case. Let me remind you lest you recollect that headlines such as "BA close to collapse" were being published in major outlets. In mid-2009, BA's position was desperate.

    http://www.australianfrequentflyer..../british-airways-close-to-collapse-17950.html

    Not only whispers in the media. BA staff were very concerned, as you are no doubt well aware yourself. My own conduits to management - which have existed a long time prior to my joining FT in 2003, as you may suspect - felt that a serious restructuring was only a few months away at that time. Almost everyone was very concerned.

    The economic environment has improved for BA since then, with notable consolidation at LHR among competitor airlines, and the LH monolith being unwilling to launch a full-frontal attack as the Gaullists did with their 772s. They aren't even doing this with the BD rump.

    But. Dilbertian management can rear its ugly head at any moment. And when it does, the situation will deteriorate very fast. BA are especially "good" at validating Dilbertian thought, for all the reasons I have discussed at length since 2006, so I don't expect the current somewhat more enlightened management mindset to last long.
     

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