Why Doesn't My Airline Understand Me?

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by MSYgirl, Nov 7, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    While planning a recent trip to Rome, I couldn’t help but notice the lack of support I received (or rather failed to) from my airline. It struck me – not only was this a missed opportunity from the perspective of strengthening my loyalty with the brand, but also in terms of boosting transactional revenue.

    Airline ancillary revenue increased by 11% to $36bn in 2012 but looking at my own experience, I wonder if this was only the tip of the iceberg. What would happen if airlines planned ancillary revenue with the customer in mind?

    Let’s start from the beginning. Since I’d already decided that Rome was my destination, the first part of my customer journey was searching for the best flight options. Like many cities across the world, Rome has two airports and different carriers fly into both. I wanted to check which was the most convenient and get a better understanding of exactly how far each was from the city centre, as well as the features each airport offered. I imagine that many, if not all of us, have made similar searches in the past. So it comes as somewhat of surprise that as customers, we still have to leave an airline’s website in order to find out much of this information. Why would an airline want a potential customer to leave their homepage in order to find information which could very easily be provided on the same page?

    Luckily for the airline in question, I did return to the booking page. With a better understanding of the distances involved, the best route and the total costs of my flights, I made the relevant bookings. A generic, and frankly rather bland email confirmation landed in my inbox a few seconds later, and that was basically the end of my communication with the airline. The only exception was one reminder the day before my flight telling me the baggage allowance restrictions on the flight. Hardly very inspiring!

    More here.

    I don't see how her experience is notable. Most of us book, get a confirmation email, then fly. We don't expect much else because we do it every day/week/month. Is this infrequent flyer expecting too much? I think so.
     
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  2. colt245

    colt245 Silver Member

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    I kind of agree with it. This comment on the link you provided sums it up perfectly....

    "Very well-said. The way I see it—airlines need to shift the perception from mere "transport vehicles" to "experience providers". The difference in steps in taking a flight versus a bus ride are significant and create a huge opportunity for airlines to take advantage of each and every one of those touchpoints to create a holistic experience. In an increasingly fast-paced world, consolidation and creating one-stop-shops seems to be what appeases consumers the most—myself included. There's a huge opportunity here to think beyond just a "plane transporting passengers" and capitalize on an "airline creating a superb, thought-out travel experience"."
     
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  3. Wandering Aramean
    Original Member

    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    You really should indicate that the bulk of that post is content quoted from elsewhere; very confusing otherwise.
     
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  4. newbluesea
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    newbluesea Gold Member

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    The airlines are in a no win situation. The writer needs to have their hand held by the airline ( most likely after picking the cheapest fare).

    There is a ton of information out there which is available to travelers if you are too lazy to avail yourself of that its not the airlines fault.
    Would the OP be willing to pay more for the added information... my bet.. hell no?

    The complaints of writer which is obviously European based could have also be applied to trains (which Europeans tend to use more) when he/she books a ticket on the Eurostar to Paris does she get told far Gare du Nord is from Eiffel tower and how much it costs by taxi?

    BTW when I do online check-in domestically I get a lot relevant information about by destination from AA or UAL.
     
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  5. ChrisUNC

    ChrisUNC Silver Member

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    The fundamental issue here is that most people are not willing to pay for the "experience". With the exception of us points whores and frequent business travelers, most people search for the cheapest fare and book it. For a publicly traded airline, why should they invest in areas where they're unlikely to net a positive return.
     
  6. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    What no one mentioned, is that, it (the article) is sponsored content. Which means, there is a punch line to it :) Boxever sells to airlines and I would think other similar customer-base.
     
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  7. LETTERBOY
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    LETTERBOY Gold Member

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    This. People these days want everything handed to them on a silver platter. They're too damn lazy to go out and find the information for themselves, which (usually) isn't that hard. And then even if they do find the information, if it's not the answer they want to hear, they start whining and complaining.

    Absolutely. Not only do people want things handed to them, they want it for free, too. People don't realize that even if airlines/hotels were giving them this stuff for free, airfare/room rates would rise accordingly. Nothing's really free.
     
  8. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    I thought the link would indicate it was from elsewhere, but is there a clearer way to post it? Perhaps starting the post with (article) might help. Sorry for the confusion.
     
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  9. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Agree, was this article is supposed to elicit sympathy? It will get nothing but laughs from the frequent flying community. The bottom line is that airlines provide a routine service, mostly in the form of "buses by air". And it isn't glamorous travelling on them most of the time, as many Milepointers well know.

    And air travel, like most modern businesses, is hyper-competitive. After 9/11, the airlines were hurting financially, and likely most weren't far away from bankruptcy. A decade+ later, many of them have figured out ways to get into the black. Not surprisingly, the methods they used to do this don't always give their customers a "warm, fuzzy" feeling. If that's what you're looking for, be sure to bring a stuffed animal with you on the plane! :D Or else, pay extra for business or first class seating, and you've then earned the right to complain when your (very high) standards aren't met by today's air travel experience.
     
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  10. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    The article that was posted by skift.com, is a first person narrative. But, who is this first person ? I'd have thought that most online, and print publications, give attributions if the article is written as a first-person ? By clicking the article one finds it is a joint venture - more like a paid advertisement.
    Further more, all the links embedded in the whole article, which are about a dozen of them - All point to this same url - http://pages.boxever.com/learn-more-about-boxever/

    Reminds me of a certain politician and his writing/cut-n-paste skills :)
     

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