When do new offers come along?

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Miles/Points' started by michael21, May 12, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. michael21

    michael21 Silver Member

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    Is there like a schedule for when new CC offers come out? Like Is it "a thing" that companies come out with new CC offers in the Summer or end of spring "bonanza" or something like that?
     
  2. deant
    Original Member

    deant Milepoint Guide

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    There is no schedule. CC companies come up with their marketing strategies and increase or decrease sign up bonus' when they feel the need.
     
  3. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

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    I would've thought that the CC sign up bonus market would be saturated by now...
     
  4. cvarming
    Original Member

    cvarming Silver Member

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    Not at all. For instance, I can be convinced to change my "goto card" with a good offer.
     
  5. Million Mile Secrets

    Million Mile Secrets Silver Member

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    There is a schedule and the promotions and increased sign-on bonuses are planned months in advance. But they usually don't tell affiliates like me since they don't want folks to hold off an application in anticipation of a better offer down the road.

    Marketing budgets usually get exhausted before the year end, so I wouldn't expect any big offers in the last 3 months, though the BA offer when it first came out was in November or December of 2009.
     
  6. FlyingBear
    Original Member

    FlyingBear Silver Member

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    Having a well defined "season" for bonus cards would be counter-intuitive to the purpose, don't you think? All companies getting together at the same time and hoping that their message is somehow better than everyone else. Simply does not make sense. If anything, they would be planning based on their internal needs with a bit of hopeful planning to get into the "quiet" times when no other noticeable offer is competing with them.

    Just wondering where that info is coming from? I can't fathom a large corporation that has an annual, not quarterly, marketing budget, or any budget for that matter. If it's a publicly traded company, they would get slaughtered if that ever came out. On top of that, last 3 months is when people will be doing all the extra spending and are more susceptible to getting another card for the bonus/spend.
     
  7. deant
    Original Member

    deant Milepoint Guide

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    Every company I have worked for has an annual budget. However, that budget is planned out by month. You explain variances (plus or minus) against both the Year-to-date budget and the monthly budget.
     
  8. FlyingBear
    Original Member

    FlyingBear Silver Member

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    I did not mean to say that only a quarter ahead is planned, but that there is an actual plan that is far more minute than "here is a bag of money, you got 12 months to spend it." As it affects EPS, I simply can't imagine any company just willy-nilly doing promotions and at the end of the year say "Ooops, I guess 25% of a year wasn't all that important to us after all!"
     
  9. Million Mile Secrets

    Million Mile Secrets Silver Member

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    Perhaps I wasn't clear enough! Public companies feel the need to confirm to Wall Street's earning expectation with the result that often times programs which are budgeted for later quarters are slashed or cancelled so that the "savings" can improve the bottom line and help meet external expectations.

    That said, some companies are better than others at protecting important initiatives from being slashed.
     

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