What's in an airport name?

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by MSYgirl, Nov 16, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    [article]

    note: Next week CNN.com launches ATL24, a 24-hour peek behind the scenes at the world's busiest airport.

    (CNN) -- You know the airport names: Hartsfield-Jackson. O'Hare. Logan. Lambert.

    [​IMG]

    But, all too often, they're just names. What about the people these American airports are named for?

    You might be surprised to find out just who's being honored by having their monikers on some of America's most important travel links.

    We'll skip the presidential airports -- JFK, Reagan National and so on, and look at some of the less evident namesakes. Check out the gallery to meet the people behind the airport names.
     
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  2. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

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    iAnd then you have the designators, which often have no connection to the city name and also indicate some paticular person is being honored.

    For instance, Orlando = MCO, which comes from McCoy Field. But who was the real "McCoy" for which it is named?

    And I wonder how many similar FAA Location Identifier codes are traceable to the names of individual persons.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2013
  3. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Let's face it, it's best for everyone that all airports have names/codes that are readily distinguishable, and not confusing. It's fine to name them after past presidents and dignitaries, as long that name isn't easily misidentified. CDG is one example of an airport named after a famous person and someone uniquely identified with both Paris and France. It's airport code also identified with Charles DeGaulle's name.

    But how does the name Ronald Reagan National Airport synch up with the airport code DCA? Bradley International Airport (BDL) in Windsor Locks, CT is named after the WWII pilot who crashed and died at that airport (as described in the CNN article). Every so often the SWA identifies BDL on it's boards as "Hartford", and it is commonly referred to that way, even it's one expensive taxi ride to travel the 15 miles or so from BDL to Hartford.

    There's also a backstory to the naming of DCA as RR/NA that air traffic controllers weren't especially pleased about. President Reagan fired over 11,000 air traffic controllers when they went on strike in 1981 (it was determined that their strike was illegal):
    http://www.deseretnews.com/article/...res-11345-air-traffic-controllers.html?pg=all
    So many (and many former) air traffic controllers never got over having an airport named after the guy who fired them!
     
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  4. flynow

    flynow Silver Member

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    Yes it's is something how all the Airports in the USA got there names over all these years!! ++ The Airport ID . There is a lot of History behind a lot of airports all over the USA .
     
  5. Counsellor
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    Counsellor Gold Member

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  6. Counsellor
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    Well,the answer is simple -- like MCO and other airports (ORD and MSY come to mind), the FFA LID (Location IDentifier) code was there before the name changed.

    With DCA, the location identifier at least identifies the location -- DC. The problem is exacerbated when neither the airport name nor the LID gives any hint as to the geographic location, e.g., ORD comes from the original name, Orchard Field, which gives no clue to Chicago, and my favorite example, MSY, similarly comes from the original name, Moisant Stock Yards, which similarly gives no clue to New Orleans.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
  7. twin123185

    twin123185 Active Member

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    How did Toronto become YYZ?!!

    Great Rush song by the way...
     
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  8. Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt Silver Member

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    As has been stated, the identifier code was put into place (often for reasons of a previous name), before the airport was renamed for ____.

    Per the OP's moniker, MSY has been the designation/identifier for New Orleans International Airport, and was named for John Moisant. Even back then, many puzzled over MSY and Moisant, but that was before Google.

    Then, the City of New Orleans renamed Moisant International Airport, to honor Louis Armstrong. While Mr. Armstrong did have a strong presence in New Orleans, John Moisant, an early aviation "superstar," died in Kenner, LA, the site of MSY.

    As almost everything else in the New Orleans Metro Area has been renamed for Louis Armstrong, I think that MSY (Moisant Stock Yards, as mentioned above, where John Moisant died) could have stayed Moisiant International Airport, but that is just me.

    Of course, I still recall when I would fly into "Friendship Airport," BWI, or Thurgood Marshall International Airport, but that was back when I flew Eastern Airlines... and Frank Borman was still at the helm.
     
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