What do you think of Dilma today?

Discussion in 'Brazil' started by jbcarioca, Oct 27, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. jbcarioca
    Original Member

    jbcarioca Gold Member

    Messages:
    17,507
    Likes Received:
    57,455
    Status Points:
    20,020
    Now that she won again I note that among my family and acquaintances there is a strong mood of dismay, and a few people are discussing personal options. They are thinking/feeling that the future for middle class Brazilians is fairly bleak, and more so if they're very wealthy.

    Obviously we are looking at an even more aggressive PT now, Some see an increase in corruption, and the Real has dropped 3.2% since last night (it is now 09:03 the morning after the election.

    So, what do you think? ...or feel?
     
    uggboy likes this.
  2. uggboy
    Original Member

    uggboy Gold Member

    Messages:
    50,182
    Likes Received:
    133,438
    Status Points:
    20,020
    Don't panic, she was re-elected and we will have to accept the wishes of the majority. Is she a good / suitable leader? For some she is, for some she isn't. Sounds like always IMHO, and regarding corruption, I believe that's happening in every country anyway, in some more "open" and in others more "hidden". Cheers.

    Squeezed middle classes, yes that happens equally in many countries, but they're still better off then the poor, and regarding the rich, yes, they will maybe get richer, but I doubt they're getting poorer.
     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2014
    jbcarioca likes this.
  3. jbcarioca
    Original Member

    jbcarioca Gold Member

    Messages:
    17,507
    Likes Received:
    57,455
    Status Points:
    20,020
    For sure I am not panicking. I already began to move funds abroad some time ago as the negative prospects became near certainties. Negative, that is for anybody who pays taxes. With 38 cabinet-level posts and a rapidly growing Federal Government role promised by Dilma we certainly will have an even higher proportion of GNP consumed by the Federal bureaucracy. That is certainly positive for beneficiaries of that largesse, notably government employees, Bolsa Familia recipients and state enterprise employees. Otherwise, the South is not quite so optimistic, possibly because the South contains the majority of people who pay for all this. In the meantime, how does Sao Paulo get water? How does the country get electricity? How will the Cuban doctors learn Portuguese? The more fundamental questions of education, sanitation, infrastructure can wait. Anyway, the newly enfranchised illiterates and the 50 million recipients of Bolsa Familia have spoken, as is their right.
     
    uggboy likes this.
  4. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,745
    Likes Received:
    5,088
    Status Points:
    4,270
    In an election as turbulent and closely contested as this one in Brazil, the country will inevitably be highly polarized in the aftermath. However, in a democracy the people get the government of their choice, which, according to the NYT, seems to have been the narrow endorsement of "a leftist leader who has achieved important gains in reducing poverty and keeping unemployment low over a centrist challenger who castigated her government for a simmering bribery scandal and a sluggish economy."
     
    uggboy and jbcarioca like this.
  5. jbcarioca
    Original Member

    jbcarioca Gold Member

    Messages:
    17,507
    Likes Received:
    57,455
    Status Points:
    20,020
    We can only feel sad that the campaign of Dilma was so full of lies and half-truths. Although Aécio was not an angel himself he did not tell outright falsehoods. By loudly and repeatedly telling the poor people that Aécio would eliminate Bolsa Familia she did successfully generate a large fear vote. Still, universal mandatory voting for everyone between the ages of 18 and 70 does ensure near complete turnout, and results are reported as soon as the last polls close. Nobody challenges the results either, because they are considered trustworthy by virtually everyone. Being online is a great benefit since people can vote worldwide (in all embassy and Consulate locations, when the citizen is registered properly) and have the results known instantly too. Last night, for example, we found out that voters in Palestine changed their voting preferences between the first election and the runoff, and could compare whatever other worldwide location we had a hankering to know. We all can be and should be proud of our voting system, if not all the results, including the >40% of all elected Federal senators and representatives who have been indicted and/or convicted for crimes, primarily corruption. The New York Times in understating reality by orders of magnitude when they say "a simmering bribery scandal...". The realities are quite dramatic and disheartening, even if the NYT missed it in this article. They've been reporting on mensalao, Petrobras, and the endless others for the last eight years of the PT and of others before that.
     
    NYCUA1K likes this.
  6. Seacarl
    Original Member

    Seacarl Gold Member

    Messages:
    10,521
    Likes Received:
    11,372
    Status Points:
    16,520
    It surely is disappointing as Brazil has so much potential as a country and is rich in resources. There is no reason that Brazil could not aspire to the level of wealth of countries like S. Korea within a generation. However the level of protectionism and distortion created by the government has really retarded that growth, and the mismanagement of Petrobras is almost criminal. It's hard to be optimistic that anything will change for the better. And if you look at Argentina that is downright scary what progress they have thrown away.
     
    jbcarioca likes this.
  7. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,745
    Likes Received:
    5,088
    Status Points:
    4,270
    As a student of politics and dispassionate observer, I find very little that is different in this Brazilian election compared to what one would find in any other large democracy other than to be proud that disagreements about the direction of the country are settled, not by the power of the gun or other form of violence, but at the polls as they should be, and Brazil ensures the largest possible participation by making voting mandatory. While mandatory voting may seem coercive, it has one clear positive: No one can complain that a segment of the population was disenfranchised, thereby legitimizing the outcome.
     
    jbcarioca likes this.
  8. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,972
    Likes Received:
    12,805
    Status Points:
    10,675
    Dilma is no Lula.
    Her social and economic policies have been nothing dramatic, and in her obsession with garnering respect, both within BRICs and also internationally, she lost the plot.

    Last year, it was evident from the discontent, that much of the simmering resentment, and protests on the eve of WC2014, were to bring to forefront the problems facing the polity. I think, Brazil's WC2014 and Rio2016 are an economic drain. Most countries hope to, and live the illusion that major events (Olympics, WorldCup) will bring prestige as well as economic impact multiplier. It is not the case always, and rightly there is dismay at the amounts being spent by her government.

    As is the case in most countries; the super rich always benefit. So was the case with most contracts given in the building and development of infrastructure for WC2014. Any government (Dilma or Aécio) will have to make some harsh cuts. I think Aécio Neves is too geeky, and in large democracies, oratory is key to capturing the imagination, or retaining the interest of the masses.

    My dos centavos ! ;)
     
    jbcarioca likes this.
  9. marcwint55

    marcwint55 Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,517
    Likes Received:
    4,573
    Status Points:
    2,570
    I think the reaction of the Brazilian stock market says it all.
     
    jbcarioca likes this.

Share This Page