What’s the best seat to avoid getting motion sickness?

Discussion in 'SeatExpert' started by @SeatExpert, Jan 28, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. @SeatExpert

    @SeatExpert News Feed

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    To steal and paraphrase a line from Dr. Leonard McCoy of Star Trek fame, “I’m a seat expert, not a doctor.” [​IMG]
    We certainly cannot offer any recommendations as to specific medications you can or should take to combat travel sickness. Having said that, we have heard from many flyers who have told us they ask their doctor for some sort of prescription sleep aid, as they find that sleeping through a flight is often the best way to stave off motion sickness.
    As to your choice of seat, you should look to sit as forward in the cabin as possible. While the entire plane could experience significant movement, especially if you encounter turbulence, the rear of the plane tends to experience increased side-to-side movement. The further forward you are, the less motion you will experience.


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  2. Captain Oveur
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    Captain Oveur Gold Member

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    I always thought that sitting over the wing was the most "stable" part of the plane.
     
  3. Cholula
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    Cholula Milepoint Guide

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    That was what I'd heard as well. Over the wing or forward of the wing.
     
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  4. I agree. While I understand why side to side motion makes sense when it comes to turbulence, I cannot beleive that there is a single correct answer to where to sit on a plane when it comes to stability.

    But, maybe a little aerodynamics needs to be considered. One rule I have heard is the the center of pressure needs to be behind the center of gravity. It not the plane will become unstable at high speeds. The center of gravity should be around the wing. So if you can picture it, the nose of the plane better be the most stable part of the aircraft.

    So maybe think of it as the center of stability needs to be in front of the center of gravity because the center of pressure will keep the plane stable.

    Think of this: If the Pilot of a 757, 777, or any long and large aircraft isn't sitting in a pretty stable position, would you feel safe?

    But on the other hand, just don't get stuck in the back of the bus, unless you like that kinda roller coster ride.

    Just my opinion.
     
  5. From NYC
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    From NYC Gold Member

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    Kinda like on a ship: the least rocking is mid-ship.
     
  6. bez7
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    bez7 Gold Member

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    Best seat to avoid sickness is your lounge chair at home ;-)
     
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  7. benchik
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    benchik Silver Member

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    A lounge chair to avoid sickness? You'd be a hero if you can come up with that one.
     
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  8. Alan in CBR
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    Alan in CBR Silver Member

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    Certainly not right up the back of a 747. In even the mildest turbulence it wags its tail like a dog welcoming home its master from a 6-week round the world trip.
     
  9. flospi
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    flospi Silver Member

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    Nope, it's definitely the front of a plane where it's calmest. Imagine a string tied to a nail. Then blow... which part of the string will be the most stable? The further in the back you sit, the more you feel the turbulences.
    That's why I always try to be in the front of the plane if I need to sleep, but in the back, if I want some adventure... maybe be the knight in shining armour for the damsel in turbulence next to me ;-)
     
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  10. 2soonold
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    2soonold Gold Member

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    me , too.
     
  11. Kagehitokiri
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    Kagehitokiri Silver Member

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    uh, arent you moving up and down more at the front than in the middle?
     
  12. tw116
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    tw116 Gold Member

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    a pilot on a small 6 seater told me once." the best place is right up front but you can't sit there because i don't want someone getting sick next to me."
     
  13. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    The general rule is to find the center of the aircraft. The wing area would be a good start with an aisle seat.
     
  14. Cosmos Human
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    Cosmos Human Silver Member

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    Wings, and I don't mean chicken!
     
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  15. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    On the 747, avoid the seat in the very nose where you have windows on both sides--i.e., 1B on SQ. On RJs and certain other aircraft, avoid seats with no window for your row or that you can see in front of you. The first row or rows of small RJs tend to be bad this way and some bulkhead seats with no window and a partition that you can't see beyond are similarly problematic
     
  16. mratoza

    mratoza New Member

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    Directly over the wing. In turbulent air, the plane will teeter-totter. The wing section acts as a pivot point.
     

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