Wearable Gadgets Upset F.A.A. Curbs on Devices

Discussion in 'Travel Technology' started by sobore, Jun 17, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

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    http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/17/disruptions-wearable-gadgets-upset-f-a-a-curbs-on-devices/

    Pity the poor flight attendant. They didn’t sign up for this: millions of petulant airline passengers surreptitiously reading digital books and magazines on their iPads or Kindles during takeoff and landing.
    The flight attendants’ job was never easy. Glamorous once, at times rewarding. But now they have to stroll the aisles of a plane while it lingers at the gate or on the runway to ensure that people turn off their smartphones, computers or tablets — yes, “Off, not in Airplane Mode.”

    The flight attendants are left to enforce the arcane rules of the Federal Aviation Administration, which mandate that people can’t use electronic devices — with the strange exception of electric razors and audio recorders — from the moment a plane leaves the gate until it reaches 10,000 feet.
    This task is only going to become more complex for flight attendants as technology moves from your backpack or purse, to, well, you. Wearable computers on planes will be an enforcement nightmare.


    Read More: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/06/17/disruptions-wearable-gadgets-upset-f-a-a-curbs-on-devices/
     
    marcwint55, mht_flyer, uggboy and 3 others like this.
  2. rwoman
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    rwoman Gold Member

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    It is not a job I envy at all...and I do work to obey the rules, regardless of how I feel about them...that's a what a good ol' book is for. :)
     
  3. zphelj

    zphelj Gold Member

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    I wonder at how many man hours are wasted on all this though when it's seems so clearly to not be a specific flight safety issue. We need more transparency on this.
     
  4. mht_flyer
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    mht_flyer Gold Member

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    Good article, but it is very true... FAA needs to get with the times here....
     
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  5. marcwint55

    marcwint55 Gold Member

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    I'm still waiting for them to decide that pacemakers are a hazard and need to be shut down prior to takeoff
     
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  6. cvsara
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    cvsara Gold Member

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    Might be something to that, but how would one get to the O-N O-F-F switch??
     
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  7. marcwint55

    marcwint55 Gold Member

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    one heck of a pat down
     
  8. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    Sir, FAA regulations require the following procedure for your pacemaker. ;)



    image-2766047975.jpg
     
  9. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    I will try my luck with the electric razor exemption on my next flight during takeoff. ;)
     
  10. meFIRST

    meFIRST Silver Member

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    This only applies to commericial avition. On private aviation, no one turns anything off.

    Personally, I think the electronic device rule is kind of dumb.
     
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