Vintage Travel Accessories: 10 Relics That Time Forgot

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by sobore, Nov 23, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

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    http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/09/12/vintage-travel-accessories_n_3891481.html

    There’s no graveyard for items irrelevant in the travel world.

    But perhaps there should be as we recall the days, some not long ago, when hotel keys were really keys, not encoded plastic cards, and ladies boarded flights with a chic vanity case in hand.

    In some cases, travel relics stir a nostalgic response. What hotel guest wasn't tickled by the presence of a vibrating bed in their room? A fistful of quarters to feed into the slot meant a fun, shaky night ahead.

    In other instances, it’s a case of R.I.P and "don’t let the door hit you on the way out".
    There was a time when flying the friendly skies meant smokers could light up with abandon from the time they boarded a flight to the time they left. Since 1989, smoking on flights has been prohibited; but on older planes, you still might see ashtrays in the arms of the seat and light-up no-smoking signs.


    Read More: http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/09/12/vintage-travel-accessories_n_3891481.html
     
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  2. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Thanks for posting, sobore! It's fun to read the article and click through the slides. Interestingly, some high-end (and low-end) hotels still use "real" room door keys today. And I'm willing to bet that I'm not the only Milepointer with a couple of wheel-less suitcases sitting in the garage!

    And today's smoke-free flights are fantastic, especially after once sitting in "smoke-free" seats located in a row behind the "smoking" seats. It just seemed like the airlines expected that the laws of physics would behave differently on their planes, and that smoke would magically stop at the "smoke-free" seats!
     
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  3. FetePerfection
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    FetePerfection Silver Member

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    I think about wheel-less luggage practically everytime I fly. How did we survive? Every room I had in Paris this last trip however had old-fashioned keys and a key fob that was to be dropped at the front desk when I left my room. Thanks for sharing...
     
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  4. cc1972

    cc1972 Silver Member

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    I flew one of those old planes on JAL last spring between Japan and South Korea. I had to explain to my kids (6 and 8 y.o.) what those little traps (ashtrays) in the armrests were because they had never seen any before.
    .
     
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  5. Mapsmith
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    Mapsmith Gold Member

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    Of course I disagree with disappearing road maps. We still sell a lot of maps to travelers who do not like the maps on their phone or GPS and certainly foul ups like Apple Maps make paper maps desireable.
     
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  6. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Yes, those ashtrays in the seat armrests are a giveaway that the airplane you are flying on is just a tad bit old... :eek:
     
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  7. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    One thing worth considering is what has happened with all the extra weight/room in cargo that the airlines have gained since the "old days" of wheel-less luggage and higher weight restrictions? When we travelled to Hawaii a decade ago, the "standard weight" of luggage, over which the weight surcharges began, was 75 lbs. and 2 checked bags per person, at no charge! Now that the "standard weight" of luggage is 50 lbs., what have the airlines done with this extra cargo room?:
    - the cargo area is also filled with profit-making "extra cargo" ;)
    - there is no extra cargo room, since the weight of all those passenger carry-ons compensates for it :(
    - it's a transport area for extra crew members :eek:
     
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  8. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

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    Good questions, and I'm speculating, but I guess most have added extra seats, so I'm not sure the planes are flying that much lighter.

    Plus, is there really so much less luggage? I mean just because you can check 150 lbs. for free, did that mean most people took along 150lbs of crap they didn't need just because it was free? And if they really needed it, I suppose they'd pay even if there was a lower limit.

    All the said, I do think passenger planes are flying somewhat lighter today. There are more restrictions on cargo post 9/11 too. But like I said, speculation.
     
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  9. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Hmmm, if passengers are more limited by weight restrictions and charges for luggage, it does make sense that they travel lighter today. ;)
    Now, the average weight of the US population has also increased in recent decades, that at least partially compensates for that "weight load" on the plane:eek::
    http://usgovinfo.about.com/od/healthcare/a/tallbutfat.htm
     
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  10. I am here now!

    I am here now! Active Member

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    I still have a Samsonite vanity case ... collecting dust somewhere! I have it, didn't say I use it. ;)
     
  11. Betty Boop

    Betty Boop Gold Member

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    Thanks for the post sobore. I recall my first flight to Brazil in 1996 - smoking was still allowed and if you were next to the smoking row it was aweful. I thought smoking was prohibited on domestic flights only a few years before that say around '91-92.
    Also I have a complete set of the samsonite luggage (mine is teal blue) pictured in the article in my garage complete with the transatlantic stickers as we made the eastward crossing on the SS Raffaello and the west on the SS France.
    Great memories.

    Sent from my iPhone using milepoint
     
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  12. Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt Silver Member

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    I just encountered a little air travel anachronism - that little sign on the lavatory mirror: “As a courtesy to other passengers, please wipe out the sink, when you have finished.” Just saw one of those in an older 747. I thought they were a thing of the past.

    Anyone remember when there were flowers in the lavatories, at least in FC?

    How about the “piano bar” in the upper-deck lounge? [Think that the stand-up bar is making a come-back on some long-haul airlines.]

    [Harkening back to another thread on attire on the airplane] I remember when well-dressed ladies always wore gloves, when flying - now they need to wear Haz-mat gloves on board!
     
  13. Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt Silver Member

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    We had a full set of the old Samsonite Silhouette cases, from 3-suiters down to my wife's vanity case (mentioned in above article), plus my matching briefcase. Those went to Goodwill, and will probably do someone a good job, for decades to come - or at least I hope so.
     

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