Video: Inside EWR MMW Viewing Booth

Discussion in 'Travel Security' started by dotorg, Jun 20, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. dotorg
    Original Member

    dotorg Silver Member

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    Yesterday, when I arrived at EWR Terminal C, I noticed that it is possible to look into the MMW Peep Show booth near the C120-129 gates.

    So, I took a quick video: Inside the TSA EWR Terminal C MMW Peep Show Booth.

    While the booth was unoccupied, it appears that an image remained on the screen. After I grabbed the video, I decided to get some photos of the booth itself and the signage on the door. Doing so caused the screeners to freak out and shut down the MMW machine.

    [​IMG]
    EWR Terminal C TSA MMW Viewing Booth by marklyon, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    EWR Terminal C TSA MMW and Viewing Booth by marklyon, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    EWR Terminal C TSA Image Operator Room - the "MMW Peep Booth" by marklyon, on Flickr

    I was told not to film, but I refused to stop. I was then politely asked not to film the screens. I decided to move to the next checkpoint and was again harassed for photographing people actually going through the MMW machine at that location. I decided I'd gotten the photos I wanted and went to my gate.

    Only to find that my flight was delayed by four hours. I grabbed a cart and asked to be rushed over to the gate where another flight to my destination would leave in 15 minutes. As we passed a checkpoint, sky marshal Jeffrey Stalker and screening manager Thomas Willoughby stopped me. They showed badges and demanded that I show the photos from my phone.

    I protested, but having deleted the ones I already posted online, showed them the nine remaining photos on my phone (of people in the MMW from the second machine). They refused to provide any rule against photography and instead said I was stopped for "actions out of the ordinary".
     
  2. N965VJ
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    N965VJ Silver Member

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    Did you see an "innie" or an "outie"? :eek:
     
  3. Clocktower
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    Clocktower Silver Member

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    This whole "don't take pictures" thing is an amusing, but temporary authority temper-tantrum.

    In 10 years we'll all have dime-sized cameras that record 24hrs of high-def video and audio, and can upload constantly in real-time. Then what?
     
  4. viguera
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    viguera Gold Member

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    You can have your phone stream to the internet (or stream back to your house) in realtime right now... and dedicated apps like Qik for the iPhone were doing this 2 years ago. Recon's Android-powered goggles can do this today, complete with GPS coordinates and the works -- it shouldn't take long before someone does this with a pair of glasses rather than goggles, and the only obstacle right now is the lack of a market.

    The "no video / photography" rule has always been a tool to be able to seize your property in the event that you capture something that "they" didn't want you to, particularly abuse of authority and the like.
     
  5. Clocktower
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    Clocktower Silver Member

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    All true (I'm a longtime Qik user), but the key part is "the size of a dime". :)

    When you can't tell whether anyone is recording (and uploading to a secure location that CANNOT be seized) short of submitting them to a full cavity search, then what do you do?

    I suspect the answer will be required full cavity searches.
     
  6. gobluetwo
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    gobluetwo Silver Member

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    Obviously, you develop a low-powered localized EMP device which will short out any stealth recording/transmitting devices on your person as you attempt to pass through x-ray body scanners, which have been turned up to be able to see through your body and detect any potential W/E/I hidden in body cavities. You can then pay the government to securely transmit those images to your primary care physician or specialist in lieu of getting a full-body x-ray at the hospital.
     

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