Using my Gold HHonors for friends.

Discussion in 'Hilton | HHonors' started by deneric, Oct 19, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. deneric

    deneric Active Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    9
    Status Points:
    80
    Anyone know what the rules are regarding me booking a room for a friend, under his name, using my Gold Honors card, but without me staying at the hotel?
    Will my friend be upgraded with the appropriate benefits.
    I have booked for my wife in the past and she seemed to get all the usual upgrades Etc.
     
    traveltoomuch likes this.
  2. flynow

    flynow Silver Member

    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    170
    Status Points:
    360
    Call HHonors and they will tell you if can get the benefits !!!!
     
  3. KENNECTED
    Original Member

    KENNECTED Silver Member

    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    858
    Status Points:
    795
    Pretty much no. The name on the HHonors account should match the name of the person paying.

    If you are not staying at the hotel, how do you expect to get points?

    The account is matched to a member, .ie., you account is for you, not for someone else. This is how most loyalty programs work.

    Also you should look at this from another view, why should someone who has not worked for elite status reap the benefit?
     
    ffitalia and webdes03 like this.
  4. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,221
    Likes Received:
    1,619
    Status Points:
    1,120
    Welcome to MilePoint, deneric!

    I'm not completely sure what you're asking. If you're asking whether you can book an award room for someone else in his/her name using your points without staying there, too, the answer generally is "yes". Whether the guest will be given the benefits of Gold status, generally not, but it can vary from one property to another (or one desk agent to another, for that matter).

    If you're asking whether you can reserve a room in someone else's name but with your HHonors Gold number on the reservation and get credit for his/her stay, the answer there is "no". (Or at least, you shouldn't, because the name of the guest will not match the name on the account.) The same would be true about the guest getting Gold benefits based on your account number being on the reservation. If you've done it with your wife and succeeded, it may be because the last names are the same?
     
    ffitalia, KENNECTED and bigx0 like this.
  5. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,274
    Likes Received:
    2,287
    Status Points:
    1,270
    The way to do it would be to book the room in both your names and have your friend be the one to check in. The hotel may or may not ask for additional credentials that way. I'm not really condoning it but I've heard it has worked (and also have heard it fail) in the past.
     
  6. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,274
    Likes Received:
    2,287
    Status Points:
    1,270
    You mean like those of us who paid for P2 or their credit card? ;)
     
  7. KENNECTED
    Original Member

    KENNECTED Silver Member

    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    858
    Status Points:
    795
    Different scenario, but I see what you're trying to do! :p

    I never suggest this as hotels are hip to this "loop hole". As I've personally witnessed, as has been reported here on FT, that properties are now requesting that the account holder physically check in.

    I'm believe if a person wants the benefit of elite status they should earn it. Also, if a person is trying to find ways to illegally "earn" points and status, by booking stays and not showing up, their account should be closed and points forfeited. I'm not talking a spouse/partner REALLY showing up at different times, but members adding friends/family to reservations, KNOWING they are not going to show up!

    I do not understand why people think its ok for someone friend to enjoy the benefits you worked and paid for? People should think of this when they show up at a hotel and they don't receive an upgrade.
     
    bigx0 likes this.
  8. Terry Yap

    Terry Yap Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,464
    Likes Received:
    2,934
    Status Points:
    1,425
    or you could get your friend to purchase a MP premium membership and get Gold status and avoid these potential challenges ;)
     
    KENNECTED and CHK like this.
  9. deneric

    deneric Active Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    9
    Status Points:
    80
    Thanks for all your replies. This is my first time on this forum and must say the members here are really "on the ball"
    I look forward to lots of interesting chat and information in the future.
     
    KENNECTED and Counsellor like this.
  10. Terry Yap

    Terry Yap Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,464
    Likes Received:
    2,934
    Status Points:
    1,425
    welcome to MP ! glad to help. ;)
     
  11. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    Likes Received:
    5,086
    Status Points:
    4,270
    Here are the answers to the OP's questions based on personal experience as well as on the HHonors T&C:
    • HHonors elites can book rooms for others but elite privileges or benefits are not transferable. The case of a HHonors elite's spouse is special and is handled differently by different properties. Make the call.
    • The reservation must be under the name of the person who will physically check in or they won't be allowed to check in (remember that all hotels require proof of identity, which is often photocopied).
    • Some elite benefits (free internet and breakfast) can be transferred only to one additional person who must be sharing a room with an elite.
    • As for earning point/night/stay credits for a room booked for someone else, this is possible only if the HHonors member is also staying at the same hotel in a different room and the charges for the rooms (max allowed is 2 rooms) are combined and paid by the HHonors member. Note that this is usually not done automatically; the HHonors member must request that it be done when checking out.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013
    KENNECTED and ffitalia like this.
  12. DJP_707
    Original Member

    DJP_707 Silver Member

    Messages:
    887
    Likes Received:
    1,043
    Status Points:
    870
    All hotels? all Hilton hotels or all? I travel and spend about 60-70 nights year at hotels and almost never get asked for ID. Big city hotels like NYC ask but pretty much no place else and I've never had my ID copied. I also book rates that require ID (government) or (AAA) and 9 out of 10 times don't get asked for ID. So just curious where this comes from?
     
    traveltoomuch and newbluesea like this.
  13. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    Likes Received:
    5,086
    Status Points:
    4,270
    :confused:Very strange. As a HHonors Diamond for the past several years, I am intimately familiar with Hilton, but have also stayed at Hyatt properties in Asia, as well as at limited SPG properties. Without a single exception, the very first thing that is asked of me at each and every property is my ID, which is always my passport. I am shocked, skeptical even, that there are reputable hotels or chains that would check guests in without ensuring that they are who they claim to be. How do they confirm that the reservation is yours?
     
  14. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,221
    Likes Received:
    1,619
    Status Points:
    1,120
    I'd have to agree (although I get "carded" closer to 50% of the time).

    I suppose one could argue that checking in to a property where you've checked in previously (although not to the same desk agent) or showing a credit card or (very occasionally) an elite card is "showing ID," but I'm not sure that's the case. Yes, I have the card, but is it "me"? When they do ask for ID, it's usually picture ID with birth date (e.g., driver's license, passport) that they want.
     
  15. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    Likes Received:
    5,086
    Status Points:
    4,270
    I can understand about not being asked for an ID when checking in at a property where one has stayed before multiple times, but there has not been a hotel (mostly in Asia) where I have been able to check in without showing some form of ID.
     
  16. Singapore Flyer

    Singapore Flyer Silver Member

    Messages:
    808
    Likes Received:
    1,379
    Status Points:
    845
    i wonder of it is a domestic vs an international one. 100% at international hotels big and small. They don't want to get short changed and such. Domestic I have had one or two that forget to ask. If you give your name and say you are charging it to the card on record they don't ask. Probably a lapse in training.

    Sent from my iPhone using milepoint
     
    NYCUA1K likes this.
  17. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    Likes Received:
    5,086
    Status Points:
    4,270
    I thought about it and figured that the difference might be precisely what you just suggested: domestic vs. intl. Very few of my hotel stays are domestic and having been "trained" to always show my ID abroad, I got into the habit of showing it whether or not it is asked. But for at least two reasons, IME, hotels need to require guests to show IDs: (a) to avoid abuse of elite privileges (anyone can check in with elite credentials that are not theirs and claim elite privileges) and, importantly, (b) as a security measure against theft and international terrorism (need to know for sure that the person checking in is who s/he claims to be!). I will run an "experiment" going forward to see how often I am asked for my ID by waiting to see if it will even be asked for (if it is not asked for, I will ask how they know I am who I claim to be...;))
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013
    Singapore Flyer likes this.
  18. KENNECTED
    Original Member

    KENNECTED Silver Member

    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    858
    Status Points:
    795
    I have never checked into a hotel without being asked for ID. Granted, when I walk up to registration I have in hand my Elite Card, Credit Card & ID.
     
    Singapore Flyer and NYCUA1K like this.
  19. traveltoomuch

    traveltoomuch Silver Member

    Messages:
    774
    Likes Received:
    912
    Status Points:
    795
    You can probably make this work, though it's also against the rules. Hilton lets you add additional guest names to a reservation. So long as BOTH names are on the reservation, your friend should be able to check in. Since your name is (and will need to be) the primary one, the receipt will be in your name, and you will get points for the stay. If your friend needs a receipt in his name, that could be a problem.

    The other way that might work: have the friend book the room in his own name, then AFTER CHECKING IN switch it to your name and add your HHonors number. Again, the receipt will likely be in your name, you'll get points, and he may get your perks (more applicable when the only perks are breakfast/net, not when he's looking for a room upgrade). This has the advantage that if something goes wrong, your friend at least still has a room he can check into, and you're not considered a no-show.
     
  20. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    Likes Received:
    5,086
    Status Points:
    4,270
    I do not think any of this is legit. Unless a HHonors member is staying at a property, he or she cannot earn points (same as for airline tickets) . Just assigning names on receipts won't do it. That is why claims of IDs not being checked by desk agents seem to me like a potentially firing offense; it makes it virtually impossible to catch the type of deceptive practice that you seem to be suggesting.
     
    bigx0 and KENNECTED like this.
  21. KENNECTED
    Original Member

    KENNECTED Silver Member

    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    858
    Status Points:
    795
    So you're advocating breaking the rules? The Hilton member is not staying and you're giving BAD advice.

    Bottom line, the OP is asking us for advice to have someone else stay in a room while he earns, points, night/stay credit and elite status without showing up! Thats against program rules.

    Why are we buying into this?

    Why is this behavior OK?
     
    NYCUA1K likes this.
  22. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,274
    Likes Received:
    2,287
    Status Points:
    1,270
    I don't think most posters are advocating this. In fact, many are pointing out that it's risky and/or against the rules.

    I don't think it's bad to post about it, though. If anything, I think withholding the info is bad. This is a board where people go for advice and information. Let readers know the risks and decide for themselves how to handle it. A lot of stuff discussed here is morally objectionable to some -- best we can do is point out the good and bad aspects so at least people can act based upon balanced info.
     
    traveltoomuch likes this.
  23. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,274
    Likes Received:
    2,287
    Status Points:
    1,270
    Domestically, I'd say I get asked for ID less than 10% of the time. I usually get asked only in downtown hotels in large cities.
     
    DJP_707, traveltoomuch and NYCUA1K like this.
  24. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,739
    Likes Received:
    5,086
    Status Points:
    4,270
    It is a reflection of the continually decreasing standards in the US service industry. Check-in desk agents/clerks should be confirming guests' IDs because many items in the T&C (as above) make sense only in relation to bona fide HH members, and can thus be abused without proper ID validation. Also: "A murder or theft was committed in room X at hotel Y but the investigation has been complicated by the fact that 90% of the guests were not asked to show their IDs so that it is unclear who was or was not a legit guest..."
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2013
    KENNECTED likes this.
  25. traveltoomuch

    traveltoomuch Silver Member

    Messages:
    774
    Likes Received:
    912
    Status Points:
    795
    Um, no. Big chain hotels may have fine print in their reservations systems allowing them to ask for ID. The number that actually do so in practice, at least domestically, is limited. To be fair, I am seeing it more and more. Maybe that's because Hyatts ask more than some others, and I've been staying more at Hyatts. In any case, "all" is grossly inaccurate.

    As for photocopying: I think I recall one domestic (US) hotel that wanted to do that. One. Out of my many hundreds of room nights. It was not a national chain property, and it was perhaps ten years ago.
     

Share This Page