Use Caution When Traveling With Encryption Software

Discussion in 'Travel Technology' started by sobore, Jul 15, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,421
    Likes Received:
    33,847
    Status Points:
    16,520
    http://www.nationaldefensemagazine....utionWhenTravelingWithEncryptionSoftware.aspx

    If you bring a laptop or smartphone outside of the United States, you need a basic understanding of how international export control laws may apply to your device’s encryption software.

    Encryption software that is resident on a laptop or a smartphone is subject to export control regulations by the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security, which enforces the export administration regulations. This is a separate issue from any technical data that may be resident on a device, which is governed by International Traffic in Arms Regulations.

    The level of regulation and available license exceptions under the export administration regulations for encryption software depends on its technical specifications and the public availability of the source code.

    Read More: http://www.nationaldefensemagazine....utionWhenTravelingWithEncryptionSoftware.aspx
     
    Gargoyle and uggboy like this.
  2. uggboy
    Original Member

    uggboy Gold Member

    Messages:
    50,182
    Likes Received:
    133,438
    Status Points:
    20,020
    Honestly, I haven't thought about this, thanks for sharing.
     
  3. estnet
    Original Member

    estnet Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,749
    Likes Received:
    2,117
    Status Points:
    1,270
    do all the business travelers whose corporate issued laptops are encrypted know about this? (don't expect an answer)
     
    uggboy and viguera like this.
  4. viguera
    Original Member

    viguera Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,737
    Likes Received:
    6,913
    Status Points:
    4,745
    We use full volume encryption with stuff that's definitely subject to export controls, but you are expected to know -- required, if you follow the mandatory training courses -- to know what you can and cannot bring with you when traveling abroad.

    With that said, I fully expect that anything that I can possibly have on my person has already been acquired a million times over by any foreign entity that has two brain cells and internet access.
     
    Tenmoc, theBOAT and uggboy like this.
  5. theBOAT
    Original Member

    theBOAT Silver Member

    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    278
    Status Points:
    545
    FYI this also applies to my company-paid Blackberry, since it has encrypted email on it, too. We get reminder emails from corporate on EC laws periodically.

    theBOAT
     
  6. Seat6A

    Seat6A Silver Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    131
    Status Points:
    395
    Isn't this much ado about nothing? Has anyone here ever had problems with a) an encrypted laptop being stopped, searched, held, etc.? or b) a confiscated laptop/device?
     
  7. viguera
    Original Member

    viguera Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,737
    Likes Received:
    6,913
    Status Points:
    4,745
    It can be serious though, just ask those people that have actually been stopped. What if some random official asked you for your passwords so they can get into your encrypted laptop?
     
  8. Seat6A

    Seat6A Silver Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    131
    Status Points:
    395
    i hope i would tell them i forgot the passwoord. i don't think we have to give it to them without a warrant in the us.
     
  9. viguera
    Original Member

    viguera Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,737
    Likes Received:
    6,913
    Status Points:
    4,745
    You would think so, but there is precedent for key disclosure, so it's a slippery slope. Certainly more so if you're sitting in a windowless room at the airport. I agree that it's BS, but there are quite a few very public cases already when people have been detained and asked for the information, under the assumption that their lack of cooperation would be used to deny them entry.
     
    anileze likes this.
  10. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,972
    Likes Received:
    12,805
    Status Points:
    10,675
    You cannot deny a citizen entry into his/her own country.
     
    viguera likes this.
  11. viguera
    Original Member

    viguera Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,737
    Likes Received:
    6,913
    Status Points:
    4,745
    Well, almost true... there's obviously cases where many governments (but most notably the US) has used extraordinary rendition to make sure people don't make it past customs.

    But regardless of that, even if they can't deny you entry, they can certainly make things difficult. Just ask Jacob Appelbaum, he's a core member of Tor, and he gets detained and has his electronic property seized and searched on a routine basis, and he's as American as anybody.
     
    anileze likes this.

Share This Page