UK Chef Nigella Lawson: ‘France is annoying little country on the way to Italy’

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Dining' started by uggboy, Oct 12, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. uggboy
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    || UK Chef Nigella Lawson: ‘France is annoying little country on the way to Italy’ ||

    Glad she made that clear, it's her opinion. She wanted into the press again.;)
     
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  2. ACMM
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    Love it! :D
     
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  3. Sweet Willie
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    warning, do not watch following if you do not like LOTS of blatant sexual speak

    Nigella talks Dirty
     
  4. newbluesea
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    Interesting.. when you are unable to discuss the lack of invention in the food of your native (little) island you stoop to appeal to the francophobes ....just to sell your book.:rolleyes:

    Personally I find both French and Spanish cusine is better than Italian ( and certainly more inventive).

    Love the comment by the chef who says "she looks 60 from behind..":D
     
  5. chef4u
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    I wouldn't categorize Nigella as a Chef, but she is entitled to her opinion. Every cuisine has its strengths and weaknesses. Attitude plays an important role in the kitchen, and trust me, I've seen egos that couldn't fit through the door. I'm surprised Nigella didn't mention how Italian cooks were brought by Katerina de Medici when she moved to France as part of an arranged marriage hundreds of years ago.
     
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  6. General_Flyer
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    Just silently enjoying the conversation here... :)
     
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  7. FlyingBear
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    A UK chef talking smack about some other country's culinary state? Was the blood sausage not bloody enough so they needed to get some from bystanders?
     
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  8. G_G
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    UK and Chef: are these words compatible in the same sentence ? :eek:
     
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  9. ACMM
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    I guess you have never had anything by Heston Blumenthal or Gary Rhodes ? Unfortunate if so.

    (Posted from my milepoint enabled iPhone)
     
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  10. newbluesea
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    Come on now I am sure there are much more deserving food items you could pick on in the British food repertiore:)

    I absolutely love blood sausages although the best ones I ever ate came from Spain.
     
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  11. FlyingBear
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    I did enjoy trying them myself, but considering the topic, it's a good food for making easy jokes about the "cuisine" of the country of origin for this celebrity/chef.

    I am pretty sure that it is pretty irrelevant for the topic. Nigella expressed her "opinion" to maximize exposure and considering the tone of that "opinion" it is quite fair to note that she comes from a country that most people associate with oatmeal for cuisine.
     
  12. TRAVELSIG
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    This type of mud-slinging is always fun.

    I also prefer Italian to French cuisine as Italian is much lighter in general (use oil instead of butter for a start).
     
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  13. ACMM
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    I was replying to the comment by G_G where he stated the text below ... so how is my reply irrelevant to his text or are you saying his text too was irrelevant?

     
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  14. lhrsfo
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    Nigella is absolutely right if you consider where French cuisine is today, compared with 20 years ago. Then, it was undoubtedly top of the pops - but it has not progressed in the last 20 years, whereas that of most Western countries has by leaps and bounds.

    Consider UK and US food. 20 years ago, both were by-words for absolutely vile - now London, New York, SF and LA have some of the best restaurants in the world and huge numbers of very good ones. Provincial cities in those countries now also offer some good dining choices, although it has to be said that neither country is strong in its heartland.

    But look at Italy, Spain, Germany, Denmark etc. etc. Fantastic and inventive new cooking. That's not even to mention Japan (more 3* restaurants than anywhere else) Hong Kong (several 1* restaurants where you can eat for under $15), Vietnam etc. etc.

    But in France, the same tired menus are trotted out in Bourgeois restaurants up and down the country, with the same tired proprietors and the same tired decor. In Paris, so many of the rising stars come from....you guessed it, the UK.

    But then perhaps those chefs will join the exodus of French out of France.
     
  15. FlyingBear
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    I am saying one over-the-top insult (by Nigella) deserves an over-the-top retort. Neither are truly representative of the true state of affairs, so talking about this chef or that chef as the good examples is beside the point. Nigella was not talking up UK cuisine, she was talking down French cuisine. Huge difference.
     
  16. ACMM
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    :rolleyes:
     
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  17. FlyingBear
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    It's interesting that you choose to quote 3* number but not total number of restaurants on the list... Statistics and all, as they say.

    I'd also argue that there is a saturation point for any country and it's not as much that France is "stagnant" (594 rated restaurants? Almost twice that of the next on the list? Four times that of UK? Yeah, what horror!), but that others are finally expanding their perspective.

    This like saying that Usain Bolt improving by 0.02 seconds is horrible, because your junior high school runners are improving by 1 second. Yeah, well, they still finish so far behind that the crowd has left by the time they got to the finish.
     
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  18. chef4u
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    Please don't invoke 'molecular gastronomy' in this discussion. Just sayin' .
     
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  19. newbluesea
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    Besides there is already another thread on the very same topic:)
     
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  20. FlyingBear
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    Nano-gastronomy!
     
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  21. lhrsfo
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    Statistics are indeed ridiculous and should take into account all sorts of things, not the least of which is that Michelin is a French organization.

    But I think that the essential point I was making is addressed in your final sentence regarding Usain Bolt. I would contend that the analogy is a point, but that you should use GM cars instead. American cars used to be the envy of the world - the greatest style, technically very advanced, the greatest comfort and, at the modest end exhibiting some of those features and extremely affordable to boot. They were envied around the world but were largely an unattainable dream. Sort of like French food thirty years ago. Today, American cars are significantly better than they were thirty years ago in almost every tangible aspect: faster, safer, better ride, better handling, more reliable etc. But foreign cars have come on leaps and bounds in that period and have overtaken American cars, so much so that manufacturers have largely retreated to the domestic market and their market share there has collapsed. I hate to say it, but perhaps your analogy might work better with Usain in Rio 2016?

    I did a straw poll amongst friends last night regarding French food (extremely unscientific, and even less reliable than a Francophile Michelin inspector). We all go regularly to France, and have done for years. We used to regard it as a gastronomic experience but no one could remember the last time they had a truly exciting meal there. Yes, the cheese is as good as ever, and so is the foie gras. The wine remains unsurpassed, and is even improving apace. But for all of us, the incidence of disappointing to downright bad restaurants continues to increase.
     
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  22. FlyingBear
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    Fair enough, Japan is nothing but a province near Burgundy. ;)

    I'd agree with your analogy if GM, Ford and Chrysler were still outselling everyone at 2-to-1 to 4-to-1 ratio. And, of course, don't forget that GM has been doing wonderfully in many parts of the world. Analogy will still work in 2016, that (now high schooler) would still be half a second behind. In other words, running through the settled dust :)

    Can't say I have the same long term and extended experience, but with the point of wine, Judgement of Paris happened in 1976, so may be the downfall started happening loooooong ago and you are not even caught up on some of it!
     
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  23. lhrsfo
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    Oddly, I think the Judgement of Paris was such a shock to the French wine industry that it forced them to get their act together - and they did, at pretty well all quality and price levels. The auction prices don't lie, even if they are dictated to some extent by Chinese millionaires who want to mix their Lafite with Coke. Personally, I still strongly prefer French wine to most of the newcomers, although I'll certainly make room for some NZ Pinot Noir....

    Don't get me wrong. I don't dislike French food at all. Perhaps my dying meal would go something like Brandade de Morue, sauce Nantua, followed by Rognons de Veau, sauce Roquefort, salade verte (as only the French do it) and, of course, the Chariot de Fromages. But, of course, it would be a dying meal because it's simply chock full of sinful things - we've all taught ourselves to eat more lightly, more healthily in a way that neither Larousse nor Escoffier contemplated. Sadly, I believe that the French are so proud of / obsessed with / blinkered by their extraordinary gastronomic legacy that they have not reinvented their cuisine to suit the modern world.
     
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  24. G_G
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    I have to admit that I'm not into contemporary english sculpture :oops:
     
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  25. G_G
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    I can not say it better :cool:
     
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