Travel the World on Cargo Cruises

Discussion in 'Other North America/non U.S.' started by Newscience, Feb 1, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

    Messages:
    14,694
    Likes Received:
    45,079
    Status Points:
    16,475
    Travel the World on Cargo Cruises
    Matthew Kronsberg
    The Wall Street Journal
    January 30, 2014

    Here's an interesting article that provides everything that you'd need to know to travel on a "Cargo Class cruise". The author describes the plusses and minuses of travelling the world on a cargo ship. If you decide to go this route, you'll likely be one of less than a dozen passengers on the ship, be at a port for 2-3 days rather than a few hours, have a spacious but sparely-furnished cabin, eat meals at pre-set times, all for which rates start at about $130/day. You'll also need to work with a specialist travel agent to pull this off. Is it worth it? You be the judge, and you probably shouldn't watch "Captain Phillips" beforehand...

    Highlights of this article include:
    - The (really) long way around
    - Southern circuit
    - Amble along the Americas
    - South Pacific sail
    - Europe to Asia via Africa
    - West by way of the East

    Read the article here:

    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304632204579339301040166302
     
    uggboy and MSYgirl like this.
  2. mhnadel
    Original Member

    mhnadel Silver Member

    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    318
    Status Points:
    520
    Since the advent of containerized shipping, most port calls are hours, not days. I still find it entertaining to watch cargo being unloaded. Once, in Nain, Labrador, that included an entire house (in pieces).
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2014
    Newscience likes this.
  3. newbluesea
    Original Member

    newbluesea Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,687
    Likes Received:
    4,739
    Status Points:
    2,570
    This article is pure nonsense.

    1) First of all a very small percentage of the world's shipping is on container vessels.

    2) Non-container vessels do not ply regular predictable routes they are engaged for
    single voyages usually from one port directly to the next.

    3) Most shipping lines insurance companies do not allow them to take passengers unless they are related to the crew or are "hired on" as part of the crew.

    4) A non-container vessel can often spend up to a week in or more in one port (or even waiting to go in to port) with no accurate prediction as to the next voyage sailing or even arrival at the next port.

    5) Getting ashore often involves some complicated logistics and is often impossible or impractical even when the passenger has the proper travel credentials.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2014
  4. daninstl

    daninstl Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,288
    Likes Received:
    1,677
    Status Points:
    1,120
    Not worth it for $130 a day. How about $20 a day or something like that.
     
  5. SpecialK
    Original Member

    SpecialK Gold Member

    Messages:
    12,170
    Likes Received:
    20,348
    Status Points:
    16,520
    Then what is the standard mode? Certainly not air.
     
  6. ella
    Original Member

    ella Silver Member

    Messages:
    326
    Likes Received:
    602
    Status Points:
    620
    There are three types of cargo ships: 1) newer container cargo ships, 2) those general cargo carriers who regularly call the same ports, and 3) full cargo carriers who go where the cargo is. It is the general cargo carriers who book passengers, a maximum of 15, for passage from a specific port to a specific port - such as Houston to LeHavre. I used to work for a steamship agency and booked passengers on cargo ships. The contract of carriage included acknowledgment by the passenger that date specific departure and arrival were not guaranteed, but within a date range.

    General cargo carrier ships have a specific route and ports of call schedule that they tried to adhere to so that shippers had a general sense of when their cargo would arrive at its destination. This is why passenger traffic works on these vessels.
     
    Newscience likes this.
  7. newbluesea
    Original Member

    newbluesea Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,687
    Likes Received:
    4,739
    Status Points:
    2,570
    Not sure exactly what you mean by standard mode. When an Australian mining company ships a 200,000 ton cargo of iron ore or coal to China you didn't think they put the cargo
    in containers did you?:)

    Let me name a few of a number of types of "cargo" ships which come readily to hand..
    1) Bulk carriers.
    2) Multipurpose carriers ( they can carry a combination of containers and bulk)
    3) Petroleum carriers/and or liquid carriers.
    3) LPGs
    4) Ro-ros ( roll on roll off)

    The role of so called general cargo vessels are shrinking and have almost disappeared (at least with context of industrialized nations) and those that travel between specific ports are getting far and few between.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2014
  8. MSPeconomist
    Original Member

    MSPeconomist Gold Member

    Messages:
    58,563
    Likes Received:
    98,528
    Status Points:
    20,020
    When motor vehicles are shipped internationally, they certainly don't typically go in containers. At some auto plants in Asia, you can see all the new cars parked by the dock, ready to go.
     
  9. newbluesea
    Original Member

    newbluesea Gold Member

    Messages:
    2,687
    Likes Received:
    4,739
    Status Points:
    2,570
    Actually cars can go a number of ways.
    1) Individual cars can and are often shipped in containers ( provided they fit within the fixed dimensions of the standard container sizes) which do provide good damage protection.
    2) For a relatively short journey the can be just secured on deck often covered with tarpaulins but that leaves them somewhat exposed to the elements.
    3) Large number of cars are transported by car-carriers which like large parking garages sometime up to twelve levels (decks) .the cars are driven in by ramps
    Whenever you a large ship with flat vertical sides and no windows on those sides .. that's a car carrier.:)
     

Share This Page