Travel Clothing Preference

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by SVDH, Aug 7, 2014.  |  Print Topic

?

Which type of travel clothing do you prefer?

  1. Regular Casual Clothing (shirt, jeans)

    71.4%
  2. Business-type Clothing (suit)

    19.0%
  3. Travel-specific Clothing (eg scottevest)

    9.5%
  4. Functional Clothing (fleece, breatheable tee)

    47.6%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. SVDH

    SVDH Silver Member

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    For some reviews I want to do, I'm curious to know what is the general preference here on Milepoint with regards to travel clothing.

    Could you please respond to the poll and/or comment?
    If you have a piece you love, please, mention it here.
     
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  2. anileze

    anileze Gold Member

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    Clothing in normal daily life, is similar to what one wears on the road. If for work one wears a tie (and suit, if in formal work environment) you would wear the same for a business meetin half way across the world.

    If you wear shorts and tshirt in Central Park during summer, you'd do the same in the places where shorts are acceptable daily attire.

    I used permethrin infused clothes in the Amazonas last year, as I use bug spray for Central Park summer concerts.

    In summary; it depends.
     
  3. Lionell

    Lionell Gold Member

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    Depends on flight time, if it's short haul during spare time I'll just wear a jeans or suit if I'm going for business. For long haul flights I absolutely love my wide comfy pants with an elastic waist band :)
    It's always comfortable, never too tight anywhere. I always bring a fleece sweater or jacket on long flights as they tend to put the cooling on.
     
  4. Mapsmith
    Original Member

    Mapsmith Gold Member

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    I usually go with Chinos, Polo Shirt and Sport Jacket/Blazer that can be used for more business like situations. Since most of my air travel is leisure, I am in steerage and want more comfort than jeans, or even a business suit. Chinos are looser, lighter weight, etc. Polo is useful by itself and again comfortable.
     
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  5. iolaire
    Original Member

    iolaire Gold Member

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    Generally for premium class travel I do a nicer version of "Regular Casual Clothing (shirt, jeans)". This might be comfortable dark Dockers light pants and a short sleeve button up shirt (sometimes craft brew logo'd shirt others more outdoors/Hawaiian type shirts). This is a step down from my slacks and shirt (no tie) that I wear to work. I'd expect someone who thought that they had taste/class would think my dress was very casual.

    In coach I wear whatever is appropriate for either the departure and destination weather - last week that was shorts and a tee-shirt.
     
  6. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    I've found that in doing business in much of the world, and in dealing with academics/professionals, one is absolutely expected to be wearing a jacket and tie (for men). You would be thought of as odd (to say the least) if you did not do so, for example, in Asia, Europe, or the Mideast (as an American visitor).

    In this respect, much of the world is quite conservative, compared to norms of dress in many places in the US. And, it never hurts to be dressed well while travelling, and at times may provide an advantage when dealing with people, versus being dressed in a jeans and t-shirt. ;)

    But, I also want to be comfortable in a long-haul TATL flight, and, like Iolare, you'll find me onboard in comfortable clothes, especially when counting down the minutes spent sitting in steerage class. :(
     
  7. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

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    You got that right, particularly for international (or more precisely, "not domestic US") flights.

    It may very well be true that one should not judge a book by its cover, but in most interactions with strangers it's that initial impression from clothes and manners that tends to frame the outcome.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2014
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  8. satman40

    satman40 Gold Member

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    The longer the flight the more casual the dress,
    14 hour flight is a running outfit with a hoodie, it North Face Snorkel Jacket,
    3 hours or less is a Docker Flight.

    I never make a decision.with a glance, many Corporate heads do not dress up just to fly, and the Top Guys have their own jets, and their own gates.
     
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  9. FetePerfection
    Original Member

    FetePerfection Silver Member

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    I tend to dress up for flights regardless of flight time but I do it in layers which can be easily removed and tucked away. I like the travel wear at Chico's and Travelsmith for comfort, fashion and durability. I still view travel as a bit of luxury, especially when I'm up front so I want to look and feel the part, including accessories. However none of my jewelry goes on until after I'm through security.
     
  10. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    How incredibly wise that is! ;) I recently saw jewelry left behind while coming through a "TSA Pre-check" line. I wonder how much jewelry is left behind at TSA checkpoints every day? :(
     
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  11. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Well, there's always the option of flying naked!: ;)

    http://airtravel.about.com/od/duringyourflight/a/nakedfkk.htm

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/01/31/fly-naked-germans-offer-n_n_84315.html
     
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  12. FetePerfection
    Original Member

    FetePerfection Silver Member

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    I know!!! Plus I don't know if it will alarm the WTMD so I'd rather get through pre-check as quickly and quietly as possible.
     
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  13. edekba

    edekba Gold Member

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    Usually it's casual unless I'm flying for work and going into work immediately afterwards or before the flight.

    Underneath it though is wool socks and Uniqlo Airism/Heattech shirt and boxers ...

    I tend to bring half the number of days worth and just wash dry them at the hotel.

    I'm pretty casual even if I'm flying business vs. coach. (Not PJ casual but jeans/chino + tshirt and a light jacket.)
     
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  14. Counsellor
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    Counsellor Gold Member

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  15. edekba

    edekba Gold Member

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    ... well clothing could get caught on the doors, etc... so maybe naked sliding is the way to go?
     
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  16. SVDH

    SVDH Silver Member

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    wouldn't that chafe? :confused:
     
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  17. edekba

    edekba Gold Member

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    not if its a water landing :)
     
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  18. disambiguous1

    disambiguous1 Silver Member

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    My strategy is similar to Satman40's. Unless I have to jump right off the plane and give a presentation (something I try to avoid), I wear comfortable casual pants with good pockets. Kuhl pants (http://www.kuhl.com) fit the bill for me but they're not everybody's cup of tea. Also, if I'm doing lots of hiking, they wear like iron, despite the fact that they're lightweight and dry quickly. That's on the plane for both business and tourist trips. Somebody mentioned Dockers, and I also find those comfortable.

    Footwear is a compromise. You have to take into consideration long walks on hard floors through massive airport terminals, but the shoes can't take up too much room on the plane, and they should be easy to take off. Usually something like these, http://www.thewalkingcompany.com/casualshoes-mens, fills the need, and can be used as casual dressy.

    Jogging suits on long flights seem like a good idea, but they don't seem to work for me because the pockets aren't secure. One of the best investments I have ever made is lightweight merino wool undershirts (http://www.rei.com/product/854824/icebreaker-tech-t-lite-t-shirt-mens). They don't get much warmer than cotton t-shirts when the air temperature is warm, but if things get cool they keep me much more comfortable. As well, I get lightweight merino wool polo shirts, again long sleeve so I can roll them up or down as necessary. I tend to get cold on planes, so a lightweight full-zip cotton hoodie helps. For me, this is the most comfortable and practical combo on flights more than a couple of hours.

    Destination-wise, synthetic technical fiber shirts are nice, like the ones from Ex Officio and the WorldWide Sportsman shirts from Bass Pro Shops. Some of them can even look pretty good in casual settings. They dry quickly and wash easy. I always get long-sleeve shirts that have buttons for keeping the sleeves rolled up, so if I get chilly I can roll them down. For tourist activity they do well. If I'm doing a lot of walking, I take along lightweight hiking boots (like these, www.keenfootwear.com). I wore boots all through the Vatican, and the Pope didn't say a thing about it.

    Some people wear bedroom slippers on planes. Mainly these are petite women, who have small shoes and who are small enough to bend over and change shoes in confined spaces. This would be a comfortable thing to do, if you can figure out what to do with your regular shoes during the flight.

    I have been thinking about the jogging suit approach for red-eye flights to Europe. If I did that, I'd get one of these, http://www.pacsafe.com/metrosafe-150-gii-cross-body-sling-bag-8.html, to make up for the pocket problem. -DA1
     
  19. Boraxo

    Boraxo Silver Member

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    +1 For short/mid business flights it doesn't matter and I am often coming from the office in business attire (i.e slacks). For long haul I generally go with the comfy pants now rather than jeans. When traveling on business the debate is always whether to pack or hang my sports jacket. Lately I've been foregoing the fleece unless I need it at my destination. As I rarely check luggage, I try to maximize my carryon space.

    For footwear I always wear tennis shoes unless coming from the office as they are more comfortable and take up more luggage space than dress shoes. For long haul I bring a pair of throwaway hotel slippers.

    Have been considering a Scottvest but I'm not a vest guy and many of my business destinations are hot and humid. However this may be a necessity if UA and others start strictly enforcing "personal item" carryon rules. There is also the "pocket problem" as I like to keep passports, phones, etc on my person when sleeping ...
     
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