Transgender individuals and ID checks

Discussion in 'Travel Security' started by PhlyingRPh, Feb 2, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. PhlyingRPh
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    PhlyingRPh Silver Member

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    Something that has been under the radar since Canada's identity screening regulations came into effect last July. There are two clauses within this regulation that are problematic for Transgendered travelers:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kyle-knight/canada-air-travel-transgender_b_1247602.html
     
  2. mrredskin
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    mrredskin Gold Member

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    i didn't bring any popcorn with me. need something to snack on for this debate
     
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  3. NYCAdventurer

    NYCAdventurer Gold Member

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    Can't this individuals just refer to their birth sex for their flights to avoid these issues?
     
  4. FlyingBear
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    FlyingBear Silver Member

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    I am not sure what to make of this comment. I just have to assume that you are confused about what it actually means being a transgendered person? The simple answer to your question is no, a lot of them can't. That's central to them being transgendered.
     
  5. gobluetwo
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    gobluetwo Silver Member

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    Oh, you'd be surprised. Gender identity is not about "just because you have this or don't have that, you're this." But about regardless of how my body looks, this is how I identify myself.

    It'd be like someone born into a Hindu family and raised Hindu, but just always feeling like he wasn't Hindu, and later coming to the realization that he's Christian. Then, when asked his religion, being told to respond "Hindu" because that's what he was "born" as and what other people might perceive him as. Not the cleanest example, but the best I can think of.
     
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  6. NYCAdventurer

    NYCAdventurer Gold Member

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    My response was not malicious at all and don't know too much about the transgender community. I definitely thought this was a simpler issue.
     
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  7. FlyingBear
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    FlyingBear Silver Member

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    I understand that there is no malice, but the response appeared to be based on very little analysis. I think that just looking up the word would make it obvious that the simple solution won't work. As far as the law itself, here are a couple of more obvious examples for illustration purposes:

    (c) the passenger does not appear to be of the gender indicated on the identification he or she presents;

    A passenger undergoing hormone therapy before gender reassignment will most likely fall under this category and will fail if trying to use ID with birth gender.

    (d) the passenger presents more than one form of identification and there is a major discrepancy between those forms of identification.

    This one is less likely to become a problem, but still an issue, as different forms of ID have varying requirements for changing one's gender. To say nothing of the timing issues in getting documents.
     
  8. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    Tangential to this issue, I have "discrepancies" on account of having remarried. I was keen to get my ex's surname off my identification, and to take the surname of my new spouse (my own birthname being unspellable and unpronounceable by most people outside my nationality). This does not happen overnight; some things are fixed quickly, whilst others take a while to resolve.

    CBP wallah in Blaine (Washington), rooting through my purse, started poring over the contents of my card-case and became very cranky at finding different surnames on items such as business-cards and professional licensure cards. The only thing that saved me from a full-bore meltdown was my having, also within my purse, a copy of our marriage-certificate.

    I was then told, and I directly quote, "it's against the law to possess items with different names on them!".

    I wonder sometimes whether they just invent laws on the spot, rather as if they were playing a legal variant of the Pictionary game?
     
  9. desamo

    desamo Gold Member

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    This isn't necessarily an easy issue, so no, they can't. Even excluding the issue of the transgendered, birth sex is a complex issue. (Article's by my husband, fwiw)
     
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  10. desamo

    desamo Gold Member

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    I've been married 11 years, still working on it.
     
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  11. GUWonder
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    GUWonder Silver Member

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    Some people are legally required to have IDs in different names from one another. Some jurisdictions have reactionary name acknowledgement rules while other jurisdictions of relevance to a given individual may have its own rigidities or allowances that legally necessitates names be different in different jurisdictions and/or for different purposes.
     

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