Totally unregulated, AA now unconfirms pax on”cancelled” flights then “reinstates”Flt wo them

Discussion in 'American Airlines | AAdvantage' started by ahappyelite, Mar 22, 2018.

  1. ahappyelite

    ahappyelite Silver Member

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    On the things the cartel’s screw the passenger laboratories are developing. Comatose and corrupted media does no real reporting on cartel-if it did it would be asking hard questions about this practice. A way to screw elites and strand non elites? Inquiring minds want to know the truth-which is in shorter supply than ever with these gangstas.
     
  2. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

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    Can you post a link to the story you're so fired up about?
     
  3. ahappyelite

    ahappyelite Silver Member

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    Based on reliable information.
    AA cancelled a flight 55 hours before takeoff on the grounds of weather.
    Passenger rebooked self on one of only alternate flights that did not work but was available.
    On day of travel, pax was stunned to find out “cancelled” flight was taking off as scheduled-without pax.
    Pax managed to get through to AA and got back on flight.
    Since the airlines are scheming liars, what really happened?
     
  4. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

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    Thanks for the clarification.

    I do sympathize with airlines trying to cope with predicted weather problems. It's not fair to pax if the airline expects two or three days (55 hours) in advance that flights will have to be cancelled because of a forecast storm to wait until the last minute to do so (pax driving to an airport in a storm when the airline knows the flight won't go is futile and dangerous). But when the weather changes, and the airline finds the flight can go (and they probably need the equipment repositioned anyway), it makes sense to reinstate the flight.

    However, when I've been in that situation, I usually receive a call informing me that the flight has been reinstated and if I can get to the airport I can take it. Sometimes I've made other arrangements (stayed home, rented a hotel room) and can't change them, but sometimes I can take advantage of the reinstated flight.

    I would say if the airline attempts to contact the "stranded" pax, they've done all they can reasonably be expected to do. I don't know the details of the situation you refer to, but I'm glad the passenger was able to catch the reinstated flight.

    I hardly think an airline would deliberately not notify pax if the flight is reinstated, and decide to fly off without pax. How does that benefit the bottom line?

    Now, again we don't know all the facts, and it may be that there was a very narrow window (e.g., a break in the storm system) during which the airline could reposition the equipment, but otherwise I don't see how it benefits the airline not to scoop up as many pax as it can.
     

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