Top 5 Tips for Keeping Your Carry-on Bags Free

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by sobore, Jul 3, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs...op-5-tips-for-keeping-your-carry-on-bags-free

    U.S. baggage fee revenue dropped slightly last year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics. U.S. airlines collected only $3.36 billion in baggage fees in 2011, compared with $3.40 billion in 2010. From 2007 to 2010, baggage fee revenue grew at a compounding rate of 94.11 percent each year. The sudden halt in growth in 2011 is significant for U.S. airlines. Ancillary fees, such as baggage fees, have represented a golden turnaround opportunity for airlines plagued by heavy losses. For others, fees have fueled profitability. In either case, airline fees are here to stay.

    However, travelers have become increasingly savvy in avoiding airline baggage fees. As a result, U.S. airlines must be even more creative in how they charge fees. In recent months, airlines have focused efforts on generating fee revenue from carry-on bags. Here are the top five tips to ensure your carry-on bags continue to fly free:

    Read More: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs...op-5-tips-for-keeping-your-carry-on-bags-free
     
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  2. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    I did not know tip #2. This seems worth focusing on as others may not be aware of this:

    2. Know the difference between a personal bag and a carry-on bag.
    While Spirit and Allegiant charge fees for carry-on luggage, they do not charge fees for bringing aboard a personal bag (also referred to as a personal item). None of the major U.S. airlines charge a fee for a personal item. A personal item is smaller in size than a carry-on and must fit under the seat in front of you. A laptop bag and purse are common examples of a personal bag. While personal bags can come in many forms, only one is permitted in addition to a carry-on. If you have a carry-on bag, a purse, and a laptop bag, airlines often request that your bags be consolidated to meet the requirements of a carry-on bag and a personal bag. If you cannot consolidate your bags, you may be required to check one of your bags (see Tip #4 for more details).
     
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  3. mrredskin
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    mrredskin Gold Member

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    i was hoping Tip #1 would be exactly what they stated.
     
  4. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    Exactly. When I saw this thread, my immediate thought was that there is only one rule... And it was #1.
     
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  5. wrxmom

    wrxmom Gold Member

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    As I was briefly considering flying on Spirit :eek: until my senses prevailed, I wondered if Spirit allowed a personal item and what the size was - couldn't find it on their website.
     

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