To Bolivia, with Love (& a visa)

Discussion in 'Trip Reports' started by AdiosAdventureTravel, May 30, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. AdiosAdventureTravel

    AdiosAdventureTravel Member

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    Crossed the border by bus, from Peru. The old-fashioned way. Since I was the only American and the bus driver wanted to keep the group moving to La Paz, I was singled out and told to follow a border guard to a dark, dingy office where behind the dark, dingy desk, sat a young, cocky border agent whose job it was to take my $135 bucks and give me a visa.
    Make sure you carry a copy of your passport on you. You need that to get the visa. Otherwise, it's a pretty simple process. Cash only.
     
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  2. uggboy
    Original Member

    uggboy Gold Member

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    135 bucks? Sounds a little bit high for me!:confused:
     
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  3. TheBOSman

    TheBOSman Silver Member

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    It is what the US government charges most people just to get an interview with a US visa granting official, and is no guarantee of getting a US visa. Several countries choose to charge US citizens a reciprocal amount to get their visas in response. Brazil is similar. Argentina and Chile both charge the reciprocal fee to US passport holders arriving at EZE, AEP, or SCL, but don't require an actual visa.
     
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  4. AdiosAdventureTravel

    AdiosAdventureTravel Member

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    I guess if you compare the cost to Peru or Ecuador (who do not charge any reciprocity fees to US citizens) it is high. But it is still easier and cheaper than getting a visa to China. At least you can just show up at the border and get it.
     
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