Tinkering with the J menus

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by mevlannen, Aug 15, 2015.  |  Print Topic

  1. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    Subtitle: "something fishy?"

    In-flight catering is, once again, up for changes.

    In the past couple of months, I have noted several variations of the time-honoured cheese plate, and now there are two new snacklets to augment the weary old troika of chicken dishes:

    -- smoked salmon with potato salad, and

    -- cold roast beef with potato salad

    I greatly like the fish. It tastes and looks like it might be wild coho.

    What have you all observed, and what do adore/ignore/loathe?
     
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  2. mtlfire

    mtlfire Gold Member

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    Got the roast beef a few months ago on YUL-YYZ. I thought it was pretty good. And the Salmon YYZ-YUL, I thought it was very good we well.
     
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  3. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    The roast beef, alas, tends to be tough and stringy, which is something that the salmon most definitely is not.

    The potato salad seems to come in two varieties: tiny cubes and big chunks. Both are notably undercooked. I'm far from an expert on food safety, but aren't undercooked potatos supposed to be digestively 'challenging'?

    Anyway, this sort of snacklet utterly beats the high-caloric choice of greasy potato-chips or of chocolate bars (which, notably, are now issued in half-size format as compared with the former ones). My diet, over which my family doctor has issued me the proverbial Riot Act, no longer includes wheat nor sugar in any form, so the only use for the Miss Vickies is to bribe various young children into good behaviour when they are visiting our home.

    (insert here the sigh that attends upon finding that one has developed a middle-aged female metabolism...)
     
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  4. mtlfire

    mtlfire Gold Member

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    Only had the roast beef once, didn't notice that.

    Now that you mention the potatoes you're right that I've had to two sizes too. Prefer the small cubes. That was how mum made it, so assumed that was properly cooked :D

    I think the small cubes tend to by YUL-YYZ now that I think about it.
     
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  5. slalom

    slalom Silver Member

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    Last night BOS-YYZ, roast beef (no choice), cold potato salad (large cubes), definitely "al dente". Package of almonds on the side.
     
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  6. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    Catching this up, Tuesday afternoon on 243 YEG>YVR utterly amazing service from an SD who was clearly in a good mood (as was the very busy FA in back). SD observed that there was no predictability to the catering (hee!) and that all that had been loaded for that particular pairing was the roast beef. So, my working hypothesis of westbound beef and eastbound salmon was utterly dashed.

    Big cubes of al dente potato, not the little ones; almonds by the side (I save them for colleagues in the office who like them!), Noted the granularity of the sparsely-applied salad dressing: seemed to be a rice-vinegar with mustard seeds.

    I still prefer the fish. Beef is vaguely garlicky (maybe it comes that way from the factory), but not so markedly-so as to be inedible. In any case, both of these 'new' snacklets (several months old, now), beat the former troika of chicken plodges right massively, and by their provision Air Canada has duly restored my appetite's interest in riding up front whilst in the Western Triangle.

    Is it my imagination, or is the quality of the wine improving too?
     
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  7. londoncalling

    londoncalling Silver Member

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    Hopefully your taste buds are not deteriorating from drinking too much plonk. :p
     
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  8. The Lev
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    The Lev Silver Member

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    Since when did Miss Vickies contain wheat or sugar? Fat- yes, Mega calories - yes. Unhealthy does of salt - yes. Other than those minor details, they should fit your diet perfectly.

    Note: Potato salad isn't exactly low-cal.
     
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  9. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    For the benefit of Londoncalling and The Lev, my taste in wine is plebian, not patrician. That's what goes down well with a bloodstream full of coal-dust.

    The Lev is of course quite right about the lack of wheat in Miss Vickies, but if memory serves well, glocose-fructose is listed as an ingredient. I am the exact sort of bloody-minded old slattern who reads ingredient labels (to my endless horror).

    And indeed, potato salad is definitely not lo-cal. For that matter, neither is the cheese tray that I had on my last YVR>YYC flight. Seven grapes, two bits of cheese, one cucumber slice (for thems wot are keen on statistics). Reminds me of my days in uni, when all of us diet-seeking girls were opting for the "fruit bowl and cheddar cheese plus salad" plan. Heaven only knows how many extra calories we were ingesting as a result of that infelicitous menu option.

    Had the Li Coste white wine on the most recent J leg; it was quite a good pairing with the cheese tray, altho' if I'd been offered the salmon entree I'd likely have gone for a more robust and toothsome red.
     
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  10. The Lev
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    The Lev Silver Member

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    Mevlannen, which coal mines are you frequenting?
     
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  11. igloocoder
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    Had warm nuts served about 1/2 way through my YUL-YEG flight today. When did that start happening? For two years I toiled over cold nuts....Now my nuts are warm when I'm not able to appreciate them as often?
     
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  12. londoncalling

    londoncalling Silver Member

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    You need to get up and walk around the cabin a little earlier. :)
     
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  13. The Lev
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    The Lev Silver Member

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    As an act of supreme self-sacrifice to help out a fellow poster, I picked up a package of Miss Vickies on my flight to YVR this morning and am pleased to confirm that they only contain three non-diet restricted ingredients - potatoes, vegetable oil and sea salt. You can feel free to munch away, although I think you might need a peatier scotch than Johnny Walker to properly accompany them. The iodine in a Islay should complement the saltiness of Miss Vickies rather nicely.
     
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  14. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    At the moment? Vancouver Island and northeastern British Columbia; in recent past, South Wales, China and the southern Appalachians; before that, the East Midlands, Nova Scotia, Yukon, Pennsylvania, and southwestern Alberta. If it's a hole in the ground in Canada that worked coal, I likely have been there. I have a rock-garden made of coal lumps from all over the world, at my summer-house. Amazing how well coal can be colonised by moss and rockery plants. In my office, I keep a collection of underground colliery-plans, and as and when I find them at garage-sales I pick them up since blueprinting's another technology that's not likely to come back.

    Best place I ever went underground was Newcastle Island in Nanaimo Harbour. Old workings went well below sea-level, yet they were dry as a bone.

    Now, as to Scotch, a very good former boss of mine taught me that brand name only counts in coloured booze. Heard those good words in a bar in Vancouver Airport in 1980, and have striven to live by them ever since.

    I like Islay singles, a lot. Just so happens that Air Canada don't see the point in supporting my enjoyment of truly decent Scotch. I have a very nice dram of Islay at hand here in the house right now (I am at home, ever so briefly), and I raise my glass to you!
     
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  15. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    Further to the note on coal-mines, I probably **do** have coal-dust as a fringe in my lungs, but (knock on wood and be thankful for particulate masks) I've no impairment from it. Probably also is some coal-dust in my blood, too, since any scrape or cut underground tends to give one a coal-dust tattoo.

    I live a very long way away from my work, even though my house is only about 20 metres above century-old mine-workings; the mining industry worked the 'easy stuff' a long time ago, and now the good deposits tend to be in unpleasant places like Xinjiang or Mongolia, or on the wrong side of a high mountain-range. My commute to my present work is a choice of one day by road and aircraft (three segments!) or two long days by road and coastal ferry (I live on an island out west).

    Air Canada don't seem to object to carrying unaccompanied miners, which is good since my spouse does not work in my industry (and is therefore spared the all-devouring commute to and from work). On the subject of 'did you know?', Nanaimo's Cassidy Airport (YCD) is about 560 metres above old mine-workings.
     
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  16. mevlannen
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    I've enjoyed warm cashews and almonds (mostly cashews) on YVR>YYZ and YYZ>YVR for the past five years or so. Of late, the SDs have been serving entire tumblers-full of mixed nuts on the YVR>YYC run. Goes well with an otherwise uninspired breakfast offering. I usually take along a bag of pea-pods from home (our pea-bushes have been prolific the past few summers) and that nicely complements the airplane food.
     
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  17. The Lev
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    The Lev Silver Member

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    Have been to most of the coal mines in Alberta, the Elk Valley, Quintette and Bulmoose in the day in NE BC as well as a few in (New) South Wales and Queensland.
     
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  18. slalom

    slalom Silver Member

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    Wow...two kinds of potatos! BOS-YYZ on an E90
    J-Class.jpg
     
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  19. YULtide

    YULtide Gold Member

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    Apparently in Peru there are about 3800 varieties of potato cultivated. And it seems about the same number of ways of preparing them.
     
  20. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    Interesting to see that someone else received the dual-potato plate. On my most recent YEG>YVR hop, the SD kindly plonked two platters of salmon-with-solenacae on my tray. Curiously, one had potatos in mustard-grain sauce and the other had the dual-potato combination. Different suppliers? Differing years of assembly? (I don't recall ever having had salmon-with-potatos in an Army rat-pack, although the salmon-with-dill-sauce was always a treat to receive).
     
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  21. mevlannen
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    Dateline: yesterday, flight 212 (YVR>YEG).

    Packet of almonds missing from my tray. The departure of almonds duly confirmed by the SD.

    I suppose that the almonds eloped with the melba toast, eh?

    At least the cheese wedges were tasty, and 7 (seven, one more than six and two more than the typical five!) grapes on the platter.

    I do wonder what might next be 'enhanced' away from the cheese plate. Now taking bets: shall it be the soliatary cucumber slice, or shall it be the unidentifiable shreddy greenery?
     
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  22. londoncalling

    londoncalling Silver Member

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    Two kinds of potatoes sounds pretty Irish to me. I have had meals in Ireland where there were three kinds of potatoes on the plate.
     
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  23. mevlannen
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    Londoncalling, it's interesting to think that a several-potato meal might be Irish. Perhaps I should have washed it down with Bushmills, then? (I believe that I actually had white wine of some vaguely-Argentinian sort, instead).

    Point of recollection was mainly that the fish was very nice, although the American lady across the aisle from me complained that it looked too much like rare beef.
     
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  24. mevlannen
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    mevlannen Silver Member

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    Looking back now to Slalom's post of September 2nd, the photograph of the fish plate looks interestingly-different than that which I receive in Western Canada.

    One wonders whether the little tiny scrap of salmon in Slalom's feeding-dish is perhaps Brooklyn-style nova lox, instead of the dark, intensely-smoky, sheets of Cascadia-style sockeye salmon that I have been enjoying.

    Perhaps there **is** accounting for regional taste?

    [edited for dreadful typos, occasioned perhaps by the snootful of Scotch-in-coffee most recently enjoyed]
     
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  25. The Lev
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    The Lev Silver Member

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    I would be celebrating anything that looked like rare beef on an AC flight (even if it actually was salmon).
     
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