Tier point collection year question

Discussion in 'British Airways | Executive Club' started by Misplaced Texan, Jan 2, 2015.  |  Print Topic

  1. Misplaced Texan
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    Misplaced Texan Gold Member

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    This may be a simple question, but it matters as I'm trying to book some BA and alliance flights that will get me to at least silver later this year.

    If my tier point year ends on April 1 (just as an example), will a flight on 4/1 count for the old year or the new year? If it's a TATL flight that leaves the U.S. On 4/1 but arrives on 4/2, how does that count?

    Bottom line is that I can push back some BA travel so that most/all of it counts in my next qualification year but need to know if I can depart on the day my year ends and have it count for the next year or if I need to wait the day and have the flight occur entirely on the next day (4/2 in the example).

    Sent from a place using a fruit thing.
     
  2. David
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    David Silver Member

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    Ok, firstly your year end won't be on the 1st April, it will be on the 8th - as everyones year ends on an 8th, it's just the month that varies.

    (And I strongly suggest you avoid using date formats such as "4/2" in your examples - the bizarre american convention for putting the month before the day does NOT aid clarity on an international site!).

    OK, so it ends on the 8th, and the day of the 8th is part of the membership year that is ending. So any flight that is scheduled to depart upon the 8th - in the local time zone of where it departs - should be counted for the year that is ending. Any flight departing from midnight onwards on the 9th - in the local time zone of where it departs - should be part of the year that is begining.

    Accordingly, for overnight flights it is local time and date of scheduled departure that counts.
     
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  3. Misplaced Texan
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    Misplaced Texan Gold Member

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    Thanks for the reply.

    I fudged the date out of some misguided quest for anonymity online. So I picked April Fool's.

    As for the date convention. I can reasonably switch back and forth when dealing with folks in the states versus those in Europe as can most people involved in business in both regions. So I'll just assume you were tilting at a personal windmill in chiding me about it, especially since it made no difference in the content of my question.

    Sent from a place using a fruit thing.
     
  4. Globaliser
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    Globaliser Silver Member

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    No, David and I and others spend quite a bit of time (here and elsewhere) banging our heads against walls because people write ambiguous dates, usually under a misguided misapprehension that if that's the way it's done in the US, that must be the way it's done in the rest of the world. It so happened that this time your ambiguity did no harm. But often it's impossible to know what someone means, especially when you're posting on a board about an airline that's not based in the US.
     
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  5. David
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    David Silver Member

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    Further to what Globaliser said, additionally we often write answers not just for the benefit of the person asking, but for the many others reading now and in the future. Some of whom don't even think about date formats, so they can and do read/post dates very differently. This can make follow up posts (related questions or further clarifications) very confusing for others - depending upon how they have interpreted the dates and how they have used them.
    And this can be especially relevant when it is talking about how and when programmes applies their year end - something which there is a lot of variation in!


    In this case, it's not ambiguous - although it does trigger a moment of hesitation when encountered as you reflect upon what is intended. You might notice that I didn't switch to the dd/mm numeric format - I used 8th and 9th with textual months to avoid any ambiguity and increase reading speed for everyone (the conversion doesn't take time, it is the alert your brain applies to check if you can deduce the intent).

    Accordingly, given that I didn't switch to DD/MM, I might just assume you are a little sensitive on the subject? (given that post).

    I described the american convention as bizarre because in virtual every other units system (of any kind!) you have 'place significance' (either ascending or decending) in the ordering of quantities.
    With time: Hours:Minutes:Seconds.
    With basic decimal units: ...., thousands,hundreds,tens,units.
    Dates: DD:MM:YY (ascending) or YYYYMM.DD (descending) - an order which aids numeric sorting (YYYY.MM.DD:HH:MM:SS often used for a full date stamp)
    ... all maintaining place significance.
    MM.DD.YY simply does not.
     
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