The science of filling seats

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by guinnessxyz, Jan 8, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/glob...s-chart-path-to-fuller-planes/article6995096/

    As a result, analysts have become fixated on capacity management – that is, how well the airlines are adjusting the number of flights they offer to match demand. Air Canada's president and chief executive officer Calin Rovenescu regularly talks of capacity management in his public statements to emphasize that it is a focus for the airline.
     
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  2. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

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    :D He's good!
     
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  3. global_happy_traveller
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    global_happy_traveller Silver Member

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    yield management is part art/part science...... constant trial and errors to see what the market reaction is to the different fares...... but after a few years most patterns become predictable
     
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  4. The software out now is much more science. They are switching metal with ease much more often when the situation dictates. Fare patterns are fairly predictable as well because the program tells them what the yield is on a minute by minute basis. The move from R9 to R0 is not a sudden knee jerk reaction by someone in revenue management;it is all pre programmed.
     
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  5. PhotoJim

    PhotoJim Silver Member

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    I've noticed the YQR-YYZ (and back) runs have changed a lot in the last year or two. They used to nearly universally be E90s but now we have an extra flight a day during the winter and the route could be on an E90, E75, CRA or even the odd 319. I'm guessing this is a symptom of the new yield management system.
     
  6. It is and its working out well for AC on yield management. their cost reductions have been quite measureable and thye will continue to work even harder to perfect that part of their plane size scheduling.
     
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  7. tomh009
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    tomh009 Gold Member

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    I think the odd 319s and 320s are (for the most part) to catch up for cancelled flights -- at least that's my experience on the YYZ-EWR route.
     
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  8. I see larger planes than listed on east/west routes some days that are busier than others and no cancellations around those times. This is part of their revenue management and capacity control initiatives.
     

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