The lock on your suitecase won't help

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by foxberg, Apr 23, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. foxberg

    foxberg Gold Member

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  2. 8MiHi

    8MiHi Silver Member

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    Now you've gone and publicized it...
     
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  3. foxberg

    foxberg Gold Member

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    It's all over FB.
     
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  4. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

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    Do travelers even still lock their checked suitcases? I have not in years after I heard that post-911 regulations were that checked luggage should not be locked...
     
  5. foxberg

    foxberg Gold Member

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    You can lock it with a TSA approved lock.
     
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  6. NYCUA1K

    NYCUA1K Gold Member

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    So that is the trick. I really stopped locking after I checked a locked suitcase and I found out upon retrieving it at destination that the padlock had been cut and the suitcase searched...I will still not bother locking.
     
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  7. Jaimito Cartero
    Original Member

    Jaimito Cartero Silver Member

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    Never locked a suitcase, never shrink wrapped one, either. No thefts since 1994 or so.
     
  8. 8MiHi

    8MiHi Silver Member

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    Too true.
    I have had all of my TSA approved locks clipped off by the TSA every time I have used them so I just don't check anything of real value.
     
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  9. vickers

    vickers Gold Member

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    Never locked a suitcase. Never had an issue of anything missing. I keep my valuables with me.
     
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  10. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Yes, as they say "locks (including suitcase locks) are for honest people."

    I haven't locked my suitcases in years, and keep no valuables inside of them, with the possible exception of my clothes!
     
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  11. Espan

    Espan Silver Member

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    well, the OP vid certainly makes the case for the shrink wrap sales folks for anyone worried 'bout that kinda stuff...
     
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  12. Betty Boop

    Betty Boop Gold Member

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    I lock with a 'TSA Approved Lock'.

    Sent from my iPhone using milepoint
     
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  13. Betty Boop

    Betty Boop Gold Member

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    Are you packing anything worth stealing?

    Sent from my iPhone using milepoint
     
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  14. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    Absolutely. All though I try to avoid it if possible, I travel to the in-laws in Bucharest twice a year with gifts worth stealing.
     
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  15. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    Ah crap, now everyone knows! :rolleyes:
     
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  16. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    AS long as TSA doesn't read this, you should be O.K. ;)
     
  17. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    Evidently, locks are obsolete!
     
  18. Betty Boop

    Betty Boop Gold Member

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    They can read?

    Sent from my iPhone using milepoint
     
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  19. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    Shhh. Stop repeating it.:confused:
     
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  20. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    If they can, they would know the 'Tumi' was worth more than the clothes inside!
     
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  21. Betty Boop

    Betty Boop Gold Member

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    Guess that answers that question. When we see bags of clothes and the Tumi luggage gone we'll know they hire at a higher IQ

    Sent from my iPhone using milepoint
     
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  22. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Now y'all are giving the airline' s baggage handlers some ideas! ;)
     
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  23. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

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    The video says "you are legally responsible for the contents of your suitcase, even if you've been the victim of luggage tampering."

    Certainly, the presumption is that you knew what was in your luggage, and if the fact of tampering is hard to prove (as would be the case if done as the video demonstrates), good luck on disproving the presumption.

    However, this brought to mind a (fictional, so far as I know) case where the presumption was disproved despite lack of exterior evidence of tampering.

    When I was a beginning trial lawyer, I read accounts of actual trials in order to gain experience in how "experts" did things. I also read some fiction, including the Perry Mason books. Not particularly helpful from a "whodunit" viewpoint (I have yet to have a peripheral witness break down on the stand under my penetrating cross-examination and confess to being the actual perpetrator), but the author of the stories, Earle Stanley Gardner, was a real lawyer, and a rather gifted one, and he used incidents (and trial tactics) from real life in his stories. I don't know if this was one of those incidents, or only the product of a wonderful imagination, but . . . .

    His client walked into his office to retain him to help her with a problem. She had just that day arrived on a flight, and when she went to collect her checked luggage she was arrested for drug smuggling. It seems that, acting on a tip, the police had intercepted her bag and opened it, discovering (something like) 5 pounds of marijuana. She had been released on bail, but they were holding her bag (and the contents) as evidence. She assured Perry that she was innocent, and someone (the fabled marijuana fairy?) had planted the stuff in her bag.

    Perry took her (paper) ticket and boarding pass, and agreed to represent her at the preliminary hearing. At the hearing, Perry asked the Judge to weigh the evidence. The Judge assured Perry that he always weighed the evidence during his deliberations, and Perry replied that he meant it literally rather than figuratively -- he wanted the bag weighed. The judge agreed, had a scale brought in, and placed the suitcase with contents including the contraband on it. Perry then offered the ticket into evidence, and pointed to the notation (bled through on the carbon) of the weight of the bag at check-in. That weight was an odd number (implying exact, not rounded, weight), and exactly 5 pounds less than what the scales now showed.

    Perry argued the obvious, that 5 pounds of something had been added to the suitcase after it was checked in and no longer in his client's possession, and that the logical inference was that it was the contraband. Bada Boom! Case dismissed.

    I don't know that such a tactic would work nowadays, though. No paper tickets, and the boarding passes and baggage claim checks don't seem to list the weight anymore, at least not all the time, although it may be possible that such information is stored in some airline computer somewhere.

    Great story nonetheless.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2014
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  24. gregm

    gregm Gold Member

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    Excellent story. 2 things come to mind. First, I suppose if the 5 pounds threw the weight over whatever threshold it gets labeled with a 'heavy' tag, it would stand out as did the paper/carbon comparison. Secondly, what a waste of 5 pounds of weed. :rolleyes:
     
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  25. Counsellor
    Original Member

    Counsellor Gold Member

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    Well, it's fiction, so -- as they say in all the stunt shows -- no weed was actually harmed. :D
     
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