Taxes/Fees refunded on canceled ticket?

Discussion in 'American Airlines | AAdvantage' started by pjoalfa, Feb 27, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. pjoalfa
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    pjoalfa Silver Member

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    I searched elsewhere ;) and the info I found was 5 years old.

    Can you get AA to refund taxes and fees on a canceled trip? I'm not talking about dropping a leg off a trip, I mean canceling the entire thing.

    For example, $1000 Non refundable fare plus $250 fees taxes
    I understand that I lose the 1000 (or get 1000-150 back via voucher if I cancel in time) but what about the 250? OK so the 7.5% Federal Excise Tax is like a sales tax so that gets paid whether you fly or not. But the vast majority of the rest of it is actual per pax fees for physically being there, i.e. 9/11 fee, other security fees, country per pax landing fees, airport fees, UK's luxury tax for departures, etc. AA doesn't pay this if I don't actually fly, so can't I get it back? When something changes on a trip with 6 people this can be a LOT of money. Doesn't seem right that AA should pocket this. After all, if I had flown they would not be able to keep it anyway, it wasn't theirs to begin with, and they rightly already have a $150 fee in place for their trouble.
     
  2. rchavez
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    rchavez Active Member

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    I seem to have read things recently in this specific area. And from what I recall, the answer is that, legally, yes you should be entitled to receive the taxes back. However, it was a challenging proposition to convince the airline to do so.

    That's about all the info I have around this though. I'd be very curious to know if folks have been successful in receiving this back.

    Especially in the case of the UK APD which can now be north of $100. Not a meager sum.
     
  3. qbrain
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    qbrain Silver Member

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    You paid $1250 in this example, and you will have $1250 to apply to new tickets including taxes, minus change fees. In your case, if vouchers are issued, they would not be tax exempt vouchers, and the dollar amount of those vouchers can be applied to airfare and taxes.
     
  4. rchavez
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    rchavez Active Member

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    Yes, this is if the OP chooses to apply those funds to a new ticket. However, if not, I believe the passenger still is (should be?) entitled to a refund on some, if not all, of the taxes.
     
  5. pjoalfa
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    pjoalfa Silver Member

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    Exactly.
    A better example might have been a typical SDQ-MIA ticket. $134 fare, $221 taxes. If you do anything to the flight, cancel or change you lose the whole ticket or take a $150 charge, which of course makes no sense if just losing the ticket is less. But the $221? It's all taxes and fees (less those that are sales taxes). In this example they typically refuse refund and subtract 150 from the 355 total, but then they're technically stiffing me out of $17 of the taxes. Other examples I'm sure can be more egregious that 17 bucks. But the question remains, why can I not receive the $221 back as a cash refund no matter what, perhaps less a processing fee (not $150)? Even notoriously stingy BA will refund taxes less a minor fee.
     
  6. qbrain
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    qbrain Silver Member

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    If the ticket is non refundable, and the OP goes with this route, wouldn't that result in a $250 cash refund? This is probably quite doable.

    In this scenario, you have paid $355 to AA and if you fly $221 will be paid to government agencies as taxes. You decide to not fly, and cancel the ticket, which results in a $150 change fee. $355-150 is $205. AA is not stiffing you on $17 of taxes, you are trying to stiff them on $17 of change fees. If your ticket is non-refundable and is broken up into $130 fare, $20 taxes, there is no means for you to recover the $20.

    Technically, if you pay AA $20 all in for a flight and cancel it, you owe them $130.
     

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