Single-Pilot Cockpit Idea Floated in NASA Study

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by adrianors, Dec 14, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. adrianors

    adrianors Silver Member

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    Newscience and uggboy like this.
  2. uggboy
    Original Member

    uggboy Gold Member

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    Actually I prefer 2 on board. Cheers.
     
  3. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    Passenger drones. Zero pilots.
     
  4. viguera
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    viguera Gold Member

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    Considering the issues with 2 plus an RFO like that Asiana flight, I'd rather have 8 or 9 pilots onboard, just in case. :)
     
  5. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    Oh... a debate team!

    (a drone might have done better than the Asiana guys)
     
  6. uggboy
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    uggboy Gold Member

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    Wouldn't bet on that. The drone was constructed by humans. :oops:
     
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  7. uggboy
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    uggboy Gold Member

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    Thinking about it, sounds reasonable. :)
     
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  8. traveltoomuch

    traveltoomuch Silver Member

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    First consider: how would you feel about having only one engine?

    After you answer that question, consider:

    The failure modes with all engines out are pretty well understood. Pilots train for that situation. And we've certainly seen people walk away from those situations (see US1549 and Capt. Sullenberger). I worry more about the case of all pilots being disabled.

    I also suspect that pilot error (v. wholesale pilot failure) would become a more notable issue with only one in the cockpit. And people do need to take a break at some point.

    In summary: absent some very significant new automation ("the plane really can fly itself"), I want at least two people around who are competent to fly the plane.
     
  9. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    I think he/they were lucky that there was a river.
     
  10. blackjack-21

    blackjack-21 Gold Member

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    Luck plus SKILL that a drone or robot couldn't have handled. Better to have two skilled human pilots in any emergency situation. The fly-by-wire flightdecks still need humans to guide them.
     
  11. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    My vote is for 2 in the front of the plane. And I'm always happy to see another pilot/co-pilot sitting with us passengers in the plane, to be transported to his/her next flight.
     
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  12. viguera
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    viguera Gold Member

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    I think a drone could have easily figured out the situation and flown as well if not better than a human... plus you have instances like that AF flight where a computer would have (and did) figure out that there was icing on the pitot tubes and took the proper corrective action, compared the doing the completely wrong thing as is often the case with humans.

    A computer can instantly recall the procedure for engine relight, while at the same time attempting to fly the plane and figure out where they're going to end up if the current rate of descent continues. There's no panic, no hesitation and no miscalculations based on loads, visibility, sleep depravation, etc.

    I think computers are both extremely bad and terrifyingly good at risk assessment, and they should probably not be trusted with some of these decisions. Still, experience is such that you could see where a computer would not have made the same mistakes as some pilots, and in almost every case the computers have actually informed pilots of the problems and they have been ignored.

    With that said, I like to have humans in the cockpit, but that could just be because that's what I'm comfortable with so far. :)
     

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