@ Shuttle Terminal - a study in contrasts

Discussion in 'Delta Air Lines | SkyMiles' started by NYBanker, Jul 6, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    I arrived unusually early for my shuttle flight this evening and got to spend a few minutes in the gate area.

    There is an 8-person Aer Lingus cabin crew travelling to dca in uniform. (This surprised me to see.) They are seated near me and are talking quietly amongst themselves or reading. All appear fairly refined and civilized.

    At the Gate 5 podium there is a delta FA on her mobile phone in a heated argument with her staffing base about getting released. Apparently her schedule will go "illegal" by not getting her home before midnight tonight (apparently she's been working 6 days straight and going over midnight would be 7, which she purports to be a contrat violation. While I don't know if this is a valid grievance or not, what is clearly inappropriate is having this heated debate within a few feet, and within clear earshot, of customers. Even some of the EI crew have glanced up from their books to look at this FA.

    The two agents at the podium are lamenting (also quite loudly) about getting pulled off an overbooked flight at non-revs.

    While I think these are outlier situations for DL (perhaps less so at their New York stations), the contrast between the behaviors of the people in the two uniforms is significant.

    ****​

    It's also worth noting that DL has re-done the lighting in the MAT in the last two weeks and it is much improved!
     
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  2. mtkeller
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    mtkeller Silver Member

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    The bigger question is, can you understand what the EI crew are saying? I have a heckuva time understanding my Irish tag ruby teammates.

    I do agree that it's pretty classless for the DL employees to be airing grievances in front of passengers.
     
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  3. TravelerRob
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    TravelerRob Silver Member

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    I don't see how you can draw any conclusions about the differences between DL & EI crews in this situation. The EI crew is not "working" and they are not in their home country.

    I think if you were to put that DL gate agent in DUB or SNN airport and give them a book they could have quite possibly behaved in the exact same way. Likewise, the EI employees may have been arguing with each other at the gate or with their scheduling base all the same.

    While the DL employees conversation was unfortunate in terms of where it happened - that's all I really think this thread is about. It's not about the EI employees behaving well.

    Just my two cents.

    -RM
     
  4. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    Correction: the EI crew - though they spoke with the dca gate agent - queued up for the boston flight and didn't fly to dca.
     
  5. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    Indeed this thread is primarily about DL employees' less-than-appropriate behavior. To your point about how EI employees behave at home base, I've flown 75+ intra-EU flights (including a bunch of EI flights) and have never seen or heard behavior akin to what I saw from DL at the MAT tonight.

    Another notable event tonight - before departure, the pilot announced that our flight altitude would likely be 6,000 feet for the entire flight! They attributed the unusual altitude to weather - which was visible throughout the flight to the east. I had never been on a commercial flight of this length with that as the initial flight plan.

    About 20 minutes into the flight, he said ATC advised we could move higher. Once we went above 10,000 feet, inflight service began.
     
  6. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    I could understand some of the staff, but not all.
     
  7. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    To me, any uniformed employee in public represents their company and should recognize this responsibility. This means that not only should they avoid making disparaging comments about their employer but also that they should actively strive to exhibit courtesy toward anyone who could be a potential customer. I think it looks bad when uniformed airline staff behave rudely or inconsiderately toward others, such as really loud talking on airport trains, shoving others out of the way on hotel shuttles or cutting in line to check in at their assigned airport hotel, pushing on airport elevators and escalators, interrupting the conversation of a customer with an agent, violating rules on board such as using the lavatories in one's own cabin or bringing babies into FC when nonreving, etc. It reflects very badly on them and their employer.
     
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  8. Travel2Food
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    Travel2Food Silver Member

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    6,000 is pretty low, but the NE corridor can be tough at times. We are often only in the teens between DCA and BOS - given the length of the flight and the cost of jet fuel, that's pretty low (especially since many piston single engine GA planes can operate in the teens).

    I've been on an AA flight that operated at 10,000 or below from IAD to LAX. We had to make a fuel stop in Tulsa. There was a mechanical issue that restricted altitude - while it's enjoyable to see the world from that level, making the extra stop is not fun. File that one under "the 757s need refurbishment".
     
  9. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    When TWA operated PHL-JFK and vv, usually on a 727 IIRC, the normal procedure was to fly at about 6000 feet. It was sometimes funny to see a new (to this route) in flight service manager read the announcements and express amazement of questioning at the altitude stat. I think this route was 90 air miles and it was scheduled for about an hour.

    The L-1011 service between SFO and OAK, scheduled for ten minutes, flew even lower over the bay.

    More recently, on a DL/NW DTW-SYR about two years ago, the last half of the flight looked like it was at about 4000 feet. There was an engine problem and we were met by firetrucks on the runway when we landed at SYR. I didn't notice a lot during the flight except stunning views over the Finger Lakes on a clear and sunny day, but the captain told the FAs to suspend service and be seated very early; they also briefed the exit row people during the flight.
     

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