Scheisse! The Air Canada Incident Thread

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by rehoult, Mar 8, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. rehoult
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    A thread dedicated to all the things that inevitability go wrong when flying thousands of flights a week.
     
  2. rehoult
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    Incident: Air Canada A320 at Toronto on Feb 19th 2011, hydraulic failure

    An Air Canada Airbus A320-200, registration C-FLSU performing flight AC-791 from Toronto,ON (Canada) to Los Angeles,CA (USA) with 152 people on board, was climbing out of Toronto's runway 33R when the crew received a low pressure indication for the green hydraulic system. The crew levelled off at 10,000 feet and entered a holding for working the according checklists. About 15 minutes later the crew declared emergency reporting hydraulic problems and advised they'd return Toronto needing to stop on the runway expecting very hot brakes. The crew burned off fuel and performed a safe landing on runway 33R about one hour after departure. The aircraft was towed off the runway, the runway was closed for 16 minutes.

    The Canadian TSB reported maintenance replaced the green ground service manifold and returned the aircraft to service.

    Source: The Aviation Herald (http://avherald.com/h?article=438f8dee&opt=0)
     
  3. rehoult
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    Incident: Jazz CRJ9 near Toronto on Feb 26th 2011, hydraulic failure

    An Air Canada Jazz Canadair CRJ-705, registration C-FKJZ performing flight QK-8526 from Winnipeg,MB to Ottawa,ON (Canada) with 68 people on board, was enroute at FL370 about 300nm northwest of Toronto,ON (Canada) and about 360nm northwest of Ottawa when the crew observed the hydraulic quantity of the #2 hydraulic system drop to zero. The crew descended the aircraft to FL310 and decided to divert to Toronto. While on approach to Toronto the crew received an updated runway surface report for Toronto and decided to re-divert to Ottawa because of the better runway conditions, stopped the descent at FL260 and subsequently landed safely on Ottawa's runway 14 about 55 minutes after the hydraulic fault.

    NAV Canada reported that the crew advised Montreal Area Control Center of the complete loss of the aircraft's hydraulics while on approach to Toronto.

    The Canadian TSB reported the #2 hydraulic quantity was depleted, after initially diverting to Toronto the crew re-diverted to Ottawa after receiving a runway surface condition report suggesting better runway surface conditions in Ottawa.

    Source: The Aviation Herald (http://avherald.com/h?article=438f901c&opt=0)
     
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  4. ACMM
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    Great thread and great title! Thanks for starting it!
     
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  5. 2MM_Guy
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    So much for Winnepeg.
     
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  6. milchap
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    It is Winnipeg. [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Where is this scheisse place on the map? :D
     
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  7. 2MM_Guy
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    Ok, I get it now. Had to google it. LOL! [​IMG]
     
  8. milchap
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    It helps if one had lived in Germany.
     
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  9. Tenmoc
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    Got me to look and I haven't flown AC since 2006 because i think they're well....
     
  10. milestoburn
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    what about AA during the same period of time?
     
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  11. Tenmoc
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    They've done well for me. I do sometimes think about going back to star. But not for now.
     
  12. milchap
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    Incident: Air Canada A319 near Sault Ste Marie on Mar 8th 2011, temporary loss of all electronic displays




    An Air Canada Airbus A319-100, registration C-GAPY performing flight AC-271 from Toronto,ON to Winnipeg,MB (Canada) with 125 people on board, was enroute at FL360 near Sault Ste Marie,ON (Canada) when an electric power failure caused the loss of all electronic displays. Power was restored after about 10 seconds, the displays returned, but the crew received a series of fault messages as various systems returned, messages included for example "AP2 OFF", "THR LOCK", "GEN 1 FAULT" and "FAC1 FAULT". The according ECAM actions were completed, the crew contacted dispatch and maintenance, in consultation it was decided to continue the flight to Winnipeg where the aircraft landed safely.

    The Canadian TSB reported that the aircraft was removed from service for a maintenance inspection, that is being handled in coordination with Airbus. The flight data recorder has been downloaded.

    Source: The Aviation Herald
     
  13. milestoburn
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    same here and on AC, thankfully, but does AA have similar issues? they must? i have no idea really and sometimes prefer not to know.
     
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  14. Tenmoc
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    AA has its issues for sure. My experience on AC was as a UA 1P(*G). It was a couple bad experiences on a couple uses. A lot of my decision to bail on star was because of AA routes and the cutting of UA ones and AC's bad experiences.
     
  15. rehoult
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    Yikes. Flying at 36,000 ft and seeing the cockpit 'turn off' can't be good for the stomach. I'm betting schiesse was one of the cleaner words in the cockpit during that couple minutes.
     
  16. milestoburn
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    mechanical bad issues? or just "general" bad issues with AC. i can relate to the latter....although sorry for getting OT.
     
  17. Tenmoc
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    My AC issues were mostly service and hard product related.

    My many issues with AA are generally mechanical or just bad luck. AA service I honestly feel has greatly improved and is among the better of the US based carriers.
     
  18. milestoburn
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    I see...back to the topic, I hope this is a less active thread.
     
  19. PtsHawg
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    I think it's YEG isn't it? [​IMG]
     
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  20. milchap
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    Incident: Jazz CRJ2 at Halifax on Mar 14th 2011, haze in cabin

    A Air Canada Jazz Canadair CRJ-200, flight QK-8600 from Halifax,NS to St. John's,NL (Canada) with 42 passengers and 3 crew, was in the initial climb when haze developed in the cabin prompting the crew to level off at 1800 feet and return to Halifax for a safe landing about 7 minutes after departure. By the time of touch down the haze had dissipated again, responding emergency services found no trace of fire, heat or smoke, the airplane subsequently taxied to the apron on its own power.

    The flight was subsequently cancelled, the passenger were rebooked onto other flights. (The Aviation Herald)
     
  21. milchap
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    Incident: Jazz DH8C at Vancouver on Mar 16th 2011, unsafe gear emitted a bang

    An Air Canada Jazz de Havilland Dash 8-300, registration C-GUON performing flight QK-8279 from Prince Rupert,BC to Vancouver,BC (Canada) with 53 people on board, was on approach to Vancouver when the crew selected the gear down but received no green indication for the nose gear. About 30 seconds later the nose gear indicated green however only after a bang. Despite the green indication the crew was unsure whether the gear was really down and locked and decided to perform a low approach to have the tower check the landing gear. Tower reported that the gear was down but looked unusual. The crew requested emergency services on standby and subsequently performed a safe landing on Vancouver's runway 26R. (The Aviation Herald)
     
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  22. flying-gal
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    In the 70s I flew a lot up to Prince Rupert and Terrace. More often than not, couldn't land in Terrace and was re-routed to Prince Rupert... only to then endure a long bus ride back to Terrace.

    Funny thing was...many a time we could actually see the plane overhead but the pilot would decide to not land and proceed to Rupert instead... (grumbling in the terminal).. we use to say... " oh, one cloud Charlie must be flying today ".
     
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  23. milchap
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    Incident: Air Canada B773 near San Juan on Mar 13th 2011, medical emergency

    An Air Canada Boeing 777-300, registration C-FIVS performing flight AC-91 (dep Mar 12th) from Sao Paulo Guarulhos,SP (Brazil) to Toronto,ON (Canada), was enroute at FL360 about 110nm south of San Juan (Puerto Rico) when the crew began their descent diverting to San Juan because of a medical emergency on board. The airplane landed safely on San Juan's runway 08 about 17 minutes later.

    A passenger on board reported that a doctor was called out for a man who had collapsed in his seat. Some time later another announcement indicated they were diverting to San Juan because the man was suffering from a pulmonary collapse.

    The aircraft reached Toronto with a delay of 2:15 hours. (The Aviation Herald)

     
  24. rehoult
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    Incident: Air Canada A320 at Vancouver on Mar 12th 2011, glycol smell on gear extension

    An Air Canada Airbus A320-200, registration C-FKCO performing flight AC-299 from Winnipeg,MB to Vancouver,BC (Canada), was on approach to Vancouver's runway 08L when the crew selected the gear down and immediately afterwards noticed a smell similiar to residual glycol fluid. The crew continued for a safe landing on runway 08L, the smell however persisted while the aircraft taxied towards the gate. When the airplane was approaching the gate smoke was observed on the flight deck and in the cabin, ATC was advised, emergency services responded. The aircraft reached the gate, the jetway was docked and the occupants of the aircraft rapidly deplaned through the main door L1, the smoke dissipated. No injuries and no damage occurred, emergency services found no trace of fire, smoke or heat.

    The Canadian TSB reported that after the aircraft was towed to a maintenance facility maintenance engineers identified a yellow rudder servo actuator was leaking from the piston transducer vent hole resulting in contamination of the air conditioning systems. The servo actuator was replaced and the aircraft returned to service.

    Source: The Aviation Herald (http://avherald.com/h?article=4398b225&opt=512)
     
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  25. rehoult
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    Incident: Air Canada A320 at Los Angeles on Mar 15th 2011, bird strike

    An Air Canada Airbus A320-200, registration C-FDST performing flight AC-790 from Los Angeles,CA (USA) to Toronto,ON (Canada) with 146 people on board, was climbing through 400 feet AGL out of Los Angeles' runway 24L in instrument meteorological conditions (low visibility procedures were in effect at LAX) when the left hand engine (CFM56) surged repeatedly in rapid succession accompanied by compressor stalls. The engine rolled back to about 80% N1 with substantial yawing of the aircraft. The engine automatically recovered about 3-5 seconds later with no ECAM warning, an acrid odour developed in the cabin. Due to the weather conditions the crew decided to divert to Ontario,CA (USA), both engines appeared to be operating normally with no unusual vibration. The aircraft landed safely in Ontario about 30 minutes after departure, stopped on the runway and shut both engines down. After inspection by emergency services the right hand engine was started and the aircraft taxied to the apron.

    The Canadian TSB reported a visual inspection revealed evidence of a bird strike in the #1 engine fan cone and showed damage to the guide vanes aft of the N1 fan. Bird remains were on the engine cowling and several engine components. A borescopic inspection showed damage to the low and high pressure compressors. The engine was replaced.

    Source: The Aviation Herald (http://avherald.com/h?article=439dadfd&opt=512)
     

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