Satellite broadband service gaining speed, coverage

Discussion in 'Travel Technology' started by sobore, Dec 12, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    http://www.denverpost.com/business/ci_19526368

    Satellite broadband is about to go mainstream, offering rural residents true high-speed Internet and millions of suburban dwellers another viable option.

    Within 18 months, it should be available in-flight for some commercial airline travelers.

    Douglas County-based WildBlue Communications is behind the transformation of a service that for years has largely been relegated to subscribers in far-flung territories because of its slower speeds and higher costs.

    WildBlue, a wholly owned subsidiary of Carlsbad, Calif.-based ViaSat, last week began offering 12-megabit-per-second broadband for $50 a month in Colorado.

    In comparison, WildBlue's existing 400,000 nationwide subscribers are paying $80 a month for 1.5 Mbps service, which is faster than dial-up but hardly sufficient for bandwidth-heavy activities such as downloading music and movie files and streaming video.
     
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  2. FlyingBear
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    FlyingBear Silver Member

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    Telco/cable companies will find a way to sabotage that, seeing how they will lose a large chunk of federal money if this ever does work out.
     
  3. davef139

    davef139 Gold Member

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    latency will never be there, cable/dsl will always have that over it. latency is key on most things.
     
  4. FlyingBear
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    FlyingBear Silver Member

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    I don't think you are responding to what I am talking about. Are you claiming that having better latency justifies old guard telecom getting millions of government money?
     
  5. mattsteg
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    mattsteg Gold Member

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    Latency issues limit the degree to which satellite options can compete, to some degree regardless of who is subsidized and how much. On top of that, satellite options will increasingly need to compete with terrestrial wireless.

    Of course, available options in some places (like my house) are so bad, that I'd happily overlook latency issues.
     

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