Rough rides on Wed 3/9

Discussion in 'United Airlines | MileagePlus' started by redtailshark, Mar 11, 2016.  |  Print Topic

  1. redtailshark

    redtailshark Silver Member

    Messages:
    1,041
    Likes Received:
    875
    Status Points:
    895
    The air has not been smooth... PHX to IAH followed by IAH to GRU...both the bumpiest flights I've had since fall 07. Nothing too severe but constant moderate chop with periods of moderate turb.

    Still... nowhere near as bad as the notorious NW flight from SPN to NRT in 2005 with multiple severe injuries and a medevac emergency caused by severe turb on descent....Anyone who naively believes that turb is fun, or that it can't bring a large airliner down, needs to do their research. I sincerely hope I never experience that again.
     
  2. Betty Boop

    Betty Boop Gold Member

    Messages:
    7,791
    Likes Received:
    37,867
    Status Points:
    13,975
    And when passengers don't secure their belongings I am sure there were lots of flying objects.
     
  3. redtailshark

    redtailshark Silver Member

    Messages:
    1,041
    Likes Received:
    875
    Status Points:
    895
    Thankfully not on those UA sectors on Wed, it wasn't that bad. Just moderate chop with occasional light/moderate turb - no service after the first 30 mins, CC in jumpseats for the remainder. Only flying objects originated from people's laps, not from the overheads.

    But on the notorious SPN-NRT flight, the flying objects weren't only locker contents...there were unbelted pax being slammed into the roof of the 747 and then hurled down into the seats during severe uncommanded pitch excursions. Resulting in multiple severe injuries. The devastation in the cabin after the emergency landing had to be seen to be believed. Great crew response though.

    When the turb reaches the FAA's definition of "severe" (meaning: a/c out of control in one or more major flight axes, as opposed to the hyperbolic pax/media versions), pax who don't buckle it pose serious danger not only to themselves, but to other pax. You will have no thought of the rain of objects from the overheads at such a time because a. you may not be able to see clearly because of high-frequency vibrations and b. even if so, you will be marveling at the structure remaining intact as the wing box flexes towards design loads... but it's always better in the window seats because there's less risk of human/inanimate projectile injury.
     
  4. Weatherboy

    Weatherboy Gold Member

    Messages:
    4,196
    Likes Received:
    7,437
    Status Points:
    5,245
    I had an extremely violent flight into EWR a few weeks ago when those 70+mph winds were blowing at the surface and tornadic thunderstorms were around the Mid Atlantic. I was shocked we flew right into those storms rather than divert to someplace else until the violent weather passed.

    Of my 2 million miles of flying, it was by far the most violent ...and I've had some crazy flights over the Pacific with typhoons there. The overhead bins opened, stuff fell out, everything in the galleys went flying, including the beverage carts that were secured prior to the turbulence. The pilots did have the FA's suspend service and stay in their seats prior to hitting the storms, so fortunately they were OK. The incident did create some type of medical emergency in the back, but I was on a PS 752 and didn't see what was going on when they brought those passenger(s) off.

    We were struck by lightning in the storms. I kept an eye on the radar (WiFi was working) and our altitude, so as long as I saw we were over 25k feet I knew we had enough space to recover from any sudden falls. The Oxygen masks never came down (we never had a pressure issue, but I'm surprised they weren't shaken out of the ceiling)

    I had my seat belt on tight and I was pretty reclined back in the lie-flat seat with pillow/blanket protecting me. If someone was in Y without their seatbelt on, I could easily see how being tossed around in that (it lasted a solid 15 minutes) would leave you a bloody mess.

    I know the planes can take more of a beating than the passengers can, but this was the first time in my flying I was worried about the structural integrity of the plane.
     

Share This Page