Roadmap to New Air Travel Security System Unveiled by Travel Industry, Security Experts

Discussion in 'Travel Security' started by AmericanGirl, Mar 20, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. AmericanGirl
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    AmericanGirl Silver Member

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    http://www.travelindustrywire.com/a...led_by_Travel_Industry__Security_Experts.html

    This is quite a long article so I have posted a few pertinent paragraphs:

    The U.S Travel Association and a panel of travel and security experts today unveiled a groundbreaking plan to improve security at America's airports and reduce the burden on travelers. Among the most notable recommendations are the creation of a trusted traveler program and a requirement that travelers be allowed to check at least one bag at no additional cost to the ticket price as a means to reduce the amount of luggage going through the security checkpoint.
    ...
    The recommendations, the culmination of a year-long analysis to remake aviation security screening, were issued in a report titled “A Better Way: Building a World Class System for Aviation Security,” and call on Congress to own responsibility for improving the current system through effective policy decisions. U.S. Travel and its panel of experts set out to achieve three primary goals:

    1. Improve the TSA checkpoint by increasing efficiency, decreasing passenger wait times and screening passengers based on risk;
    2. Generate greater governmental efficiency and cooperation in executing its security responsibilities; and
    3. Restructure America's national approach to aviation security by developing and using risk management methods and tools.
    ...
    The blue ribbon panel created by U.S. Travel was chaired by former Department of Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge, former Congressman Jim Turner and Sam Gilliland, president and chief executive officer of Sabre Holdings. The panel consisted of former top officials from DHS and TSA; representatives from the airline, airport, logistics and security technology sectors; and leaders who represent the destinations and other businesses reliant on a functional air travel system.

    Rooted in the diverse professional and political viewpoints of the panelists, the group did not always find consensus in how to address the difficult challenges. Among the panel’s recommendations in the report:

    • Implement a risk-based trusted traveler program. Congress should authorize TSA to implement a new, voluntary, government-run trusted traveler program that utilizes a risk-based approach to checkpoint screening, with the goal of refocusing resources on the highest risk passengers;
    • Improve preparation of travelers. Industry stakeholders should work with TSA to improve their education and communication on security rules and regulations, targeting locations and sources that travelers are likely to review as they book or prepare for a trip;
    • Encourage fewer carry-on bags. The Department of Transportation (DOT) should issue regulations requiring airlines to allow passengers one checked bag as part of their base airfare and standardize existing rules covering the quantity and size of items that can be carried onto an airplane;
    • Reduce duplicative TSA screening for international arrivals. DHS should enable certain low-risk passengers who are traveling to another domestic airport to forego checked baggage and passenger screening upon landing in the U.S.;
    • Expand trusted traveler programs to qualified international passengers. DHS should expand access to international trusted traveler programs for international passengers entering the U.S., as well as lead efforts to establish a multinational network of streamlined entry procedures for low-risk travelers;
    • Give TSA authority over the entire checkpoint area. Congress should immediately act to clear up confusion over “ownership” of commercial aviation security and authorize TSA to control the entire security checkpoint starting at the beginning of the security lines and ending after a traveler exits the screening area;
    • Develop a comprehensive technology procurement strategy. TSA, in collaboration with technology vendors and the travel community, should develop a comprehensive strategy for implementing necessary checkpoint technology capabilities. Congress should provide multi-year funding plans for TSA to execute this strategy;
    • Implement well-defined risk management processes. The Administration should convene an external panel of experts with appropriate security clearances to review TSA aviation security programs, assess the risk each is designed to mitigate and develop metrics for measuring progress to lessen that risk.
     
    bonnerbl and IMGone like this.
  2. IMGone
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    IMGone Silver Member

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    while I have not read the entire article, your excerpts are enough to tell me this is more of the same and will do nothing to make my experience as a ff any better. The number one thing tsa should do is add transparency to gain the trust of the traveler. They do not have mine, and therefore I would not submit to a trusted traveler program they administer, they have proven themselves as individuals and an organization to lies, steal and cheat each other, the public and congress to get what they want.

    Furthermore this approach removes any priority benefit to the screening area for ff and is sure to make our experience even more painful than it already is. While it sounds good in parts, execution under the current organization is impossible imo and therefore renders this another useless report on the ineffectiveness of what we have today which will be ignored by the administration and senior mgmt of tsa/dhs
     
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  3. AmericanGirl
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    AmericanGirl Silver Member

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    I agree with you IMGone. The part about TSA wanting control over the entire security screening area is troublesome as well. In fact, a lot of what DHS/TSA said is troublsome.
     
    kwai likes this.
  4. chollie
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    chollie Silver Member

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    I don't see anything good coming out of this.

    TSA will focus on 'multi-year funding' part of technology acquisition plan, reduction of bags going through the checkpoint (first by mandating airlines allow one free bag, then by mandating airlines only allow one carry-on), and complete control over the so-called 'sterile' area (which I suspect will be expanded to include the entire airport).

    I suspect 'trusted traveller' is far down on the list and if it ever comes about, it will be designed first and foremost with revenue generation in mind. Any such program will probably be tied to a push to eliminate elite lines in an effort to 'encourage' elite flyers to buy into 'trusted traveller'. I recall the big hopes for CLEAR and how relatively little the eventual program had to offer - nothing, really, to a leisure traveller, since IIRC, one had to buy a 'pass' for each airport, and shoes/outerwear still had to be removed, etc. I wouldn't be surprised to see any 'trusted traveller' program also linked to mandatory NoS.

    I have had a NEXUS long before GE. When I travel by land to Canada, it is interesting to observe the differences between Canada and US handling. Canada - slow down, then pass by (unless flagged down - I never have been). US - just an express lane, photo taken at two stops, then another stop at the gate to be interrogated by the CBP.
     

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