Ridiculous Boarding Process

Discussion in 'Air Canada | Aeroplan' started by avflyer, Aug 7, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. avflyer
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    avflyer Silver Member

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    I was on an LAX-YYZ in Business last week. I must say, that the A/C standard for "those needing a little more time down the jet-way" is pretty stupid. It looked like if you had a case of heat rash, you and thirty other family members were allowed priority boarding. All kidding aside, there was one older gentleman who was a bit slow, but no less than eight family members were allowed to escort him. Need I say, when it came time to de-plane, these self-same "family members" left pops in the dust?!

    But I digress. After the elderly, infirm etc. were allowed to board, then "all families with small children" (United did away with this long ago thank heaven) were allowed to board. By the time they called business to board (those that actually PAID for the benefit), it seemed like half of the 321 was full.

    As I say, ridiculous. AC is a fine airline in so many ways, but this is just stupid.
     
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  2. wembleygal
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    Just try SAS where it is a free-for-all ...
     
  3. avflyer
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    Actually, several studies have been done and "free for all" has been shown to be the fastest, most efficient boarding process. Not that I advocate it, mind you.
     
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  4. The Winger
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    The Winger Silver Member

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    I see this on practically every AC flight I am on, and rarely see the gate agents enforcing the rules. UA and US seem to enforce the rules all the time, I always see people being told to wait until their group/row is called. I wish AC was more vigilant with this, it is a benefit I appreciate.
     
  5. cordray2643
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    cordray2643 Silver Member

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    As much as I don't like the process, Southwest can board a plane very fast. I honestly don't know how they do it. 20-25 minute turns are normal and I have even seen 10-15 minutes when the plane is not full.
     
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  6. milestoburn
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    milestoburn Gold Member

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    nothing better than being at LGA in a crapped..i mean cramped terminal with status pax lined up with 20 minutes to board only to have to let persons with assistance have to push by all the grumpy men to board...

    i find southwest works perfect.

    blue cards for pre-board given out in advance. blue first then the rest in order...after 1st group, then families and then the rest. works perfect.
     
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  7. 2MM_Guy
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    I do like the pre-lineup where you get into your "slot" before the boarding process starts.
     
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  8. avflyer
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    I find the people lined up in advance just as annoying. I call it LCOOS (Last Chopper out of Saigon) syndrome.
     
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  9. Travelsavant
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    Simple really, FREE CHECKED BAGGAGE!:) most pax aren't carrying all their bags on board. Walk on, sit down, plane leaves.
     
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  10. avflyer
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    A lot of truth there. SWA thinks long term and how each decision effects their model. A crucial part of that "model" being fast turn times. No one turns a 737 like Southwest.
     
  11. cordray2643
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    And yet, most flights still have gate checked bags!
     
  12. global_happy_traveller
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    The industry should have limited the weight of check in luggage as opposed to the number of luggafes allowed
     
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  13. milestoburn
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    and they can even make money and sell tickets for low prices. i wonder what AC will monetize next.
     
  14. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    Nah...the gate lice and boarding scrums were a problem even when checked bags were free. That planes are more full now than they used to be and passengers are less civil than they used to be are more significant than the baggage thing IMO.
     
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  15. Canadi>n
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    LAX is one of those airports where AC likes to be "family friendly" and agents become overly lax about boarding protocol, particularly at this time of year. Unfortunately, all too often families overwhelm the rest of us. Remember, we experience similar runs on the boarding gate everywhere. I've been to airports world over and no matter how disciplined the boarding process is, there is a rush by dozens who shouldn't be pre boarded but who try to get through.

    In one way, the recent change UA has introduced by eliminating pre boarding to anyone but uniformed military, may well be the best way to go. Though its follow up elite process still leaves something to be desired. Still, we elites get on ahead of most of the rabble, and are sitting in the good seats with the best view of the perp walk, so not too much to complain about (except the way the first row of F or J never has overhead space, particularly odd because our stuff can't be stowed under a seat in front of us).
     
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  16. mevlannen
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    Being one of those inconveniently middle-aged people with a mobility impairment (nothing catastrophic: I just need my canes to walk down ramps without falling), I greatly appreciate AC's general practice of identifying and calling up those of us with wheelchairs, or canes, or walkers, before the pre-board announcement is made. Sometimes I even get all the way down the ramp and into seat 1A before the marathon-runners bowl me over.

    I must also acknowledge that, except for the little CRJs, there is plenty of stowage space up front in the J cabin, so it probably won't hurt me any to wait until 'last call' is sounded for final boarding. After all, most aircraft board from the front doors anyway, and my seat will be in the aisle up front, so about all I am risking is the question of there still being enough stowage space for my cane(s).

    The 'blue card' actually sounds like it would be a good idea. I wonder whether AC ever tried it?
     
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  17. mevlannen
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    Some airlines do this already. In my admittedly-limited experience, though, it's more common on those airlines which use smaller types of aircraft. I can easily comprehend the need to limit hand-luggage weight on floatplanes, for example. Harbour Air, one of the larger floatplane services here in Cascadia, weigh everything and are scrupulous about refusing baggage which exceeds their very low allowable weight (10 or 12 pounds, if memory serves me correctly).

    And y'know? I'd rather travel light than have to swim my way out of a downed aircraft. That sea-water is remarkably cold.
     
  18. Tangoer
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    Err, Canadi>n you appear to have inadvertantly copied the entire Internet into your signature. :D
     
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  19. En-Route
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    The DYKWIA signature?
     

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