QANTAS launches "Sleep Sooner Service" out of Asia

Discussion in 'Qantas Airways | Frequent Flyer' started by SYD, Jan 17, 2015.  |  Print Topic

  1. SYD

    SYD Silver Member

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    Looking forward to trying out the new QF A330 J product. Entire A330 fleet is being upgraded for domestic C2C (which must be a new benchmark for domestic J) and medium haul flights to Asia (eg SIN, BKK, CGK) and HNL.

    Those Asian flights are often "red eyes" back to Oz and while they're painfully long down the back, they're arguably too short to get a decent sleep up the front (First World problems...). The new seats allow you to partially recline for taxi/takeoff/landing plus will be made ready for sleeping before boarding if you request it at the QF Lounge.

    "Business travellers should be able to eke an extra hour’s sleep on flights from Asia under Qantas’ new 'Sleep Sooner' service."

    http://www.ausbt.com.au/qantas-launches-new-sleep-sooner-service-in-business-class

    Plus they're throwing some nice looking amenities kits (to add to collection....).

    http://www.ausbt.com.au/qantas-orot...&utm_medium=flipper&utm_campaign=home-flipper
     
  2. windchaser777

    windchaser777 Member

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    It's a nice idea in theory, but from a safety standpoint being able to sleep during take-off and landing just fills me with horror. I also wouldn't be surprised if the insurance brokers tell QF if they want to do this, then they (the broker) won't pay out on any claims.
     
  3. Globaliser
    Original Member

    Globaliser Silver Member

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    If it wasn't safe, do you think the regulators would permit it, let alone the insurers? If the insurers didn't permit this, do you really think QF would run the risk of self-insuring? The airline would just tell people to sit up; it's conventional and nobody would be any the wiser.

    And it's not as if airlines don't already do many things for safety reasons that their passengers find inconvenient. QF would have no difficulty in imposing a further inconvenience if that's what the regulators and insurers require it to do.

    So if it's permitted, then even without any inside information you can be practically certain that it will have been approved by the regulators and by the insurers.

    After all, it's not as if QF is alone in permitting recline during takeoff and landing.
     
  4. windchaser777

    windchaser777 Member

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    I didn't know you worked in an Aviation Safety division Globaliser. Are you government or airline?
     
  5. HaveMilesWillTravel
    Original Member

    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    Do you really think Qantas didn't think this through?
     
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  6. eponymous_coward
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    eponymous_coward Gold Member

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    I'm sure airlines do expensive refitting and advertising all the time and then realize "oh, right, we totally forgot about government regulation of the airline industry and our insurers", because that's something large businesses do all the time, completely forget the fundamentals of their business and things they deal with every day.
     
  7. Globaliser
    Original Member

    Globaliser Silver Member

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    You know, some things really need specific expertise.

    This doesn't. Three of us have independently worked it out from first principles, applied to a little knowledge of what's available across the breadth of the industry.

    Of course, it may be that you know differently, and that you can show us that other airlines which allow reclining during takeoff and landing in their seats are also breaking their regulatory requirements and flying uninsured. If so, I for one would be happy to be corrected.

    And that's before getting into points of detail about how often an insurance broker decides whether to pay a claim. Do you know what a broker does?
     
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