Public Transportation

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by sfo1, Jun 5, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. sfo1
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    sfo1 Silver Member

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    In your travels to different countries and using public transportation which country has the least polite people when ridding ie subways, buses when elderly and/or disabled persons need a seat?

    My vote China
     
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  2. FetePerfection
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    Hmmm, how about the US? Otherwise I vote for Italy.
     
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  3. Falcon View
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    Another vote for U.S.
     
  4. viguera
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    Country is entirely too general in most cases, and you'd have to narrow it down significantly.

    "Public transportation" in the US in general is entirely too varied... people on the bus in Chicago are nowhere near the same as people riding the subway in NYC or BART.

    You'll find that people's attitudes even within the same city vary just simply based on the time of day, especially in major metropolitan areas. NYC subways are no place to be during rush hour if you're not going to partake in the madness. Hell, most stations aren't even elderly/disabled friendly and the ones that are were only recently upgraded.

    I don't take the subway nearly as much as I used to, and I can't even remember the last time I took the bus, but I remember you'll see a whole different set of people in the subway after rush hour -- the people that use mass transit to get around, rather than the regular commuters that use it to get to work. That just leads to a different atmosphere than when people are only thinking about cramming into the next train/bus to be able to get to work on time.
     
  5. Jimgotkp
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    Most likely the US but I haven't been to a lot of countries so my answer is not the greatest.

    In terms of most polite people, it would be South Korea except during rush hour. Whenever an elderly person rides the bus or subway there is usually one younger person who stands up and gives their seat to the elderly person.
     
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  6. thewinchester
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    I'd concur with you on South Korea. The courtesy is supurb and effortless, on par with the Japanese.

    And yes, rush hour on the Seoul Metro is a nightmare. Tried it once, and then just opted for taxis during that time of the day/night.

    For me, I actually detest Singapore the most, and it's because of how a specific race prominent there are the most frequent offenders when it comes to courtesy and decency. Singaporeans and Malay people are kind and courteous, but this one specific group, not withstanding their lack of frequent bathing and washing letting BO waft through the cabin, and their inability to board and move around the cabin in a courteous fashion annoys me to no end.

    To the Singaporeans credit, they take major efforts on public education and they run them in all four languages frequently spoken on the island - but try as they might over the many years, this one specific group doesn't get it, and the train companies don't have inspectors aboard to both enforce and fine offenders which makes the campaign all carrot and no stick.
     
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  7. Wandering Aramean
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    Not to completely destroy the reputation that we've worked so hard to cultivate here, but you often see this in NYC, too. Even at rush hour.
     
  8. jbcarioca
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    This is a tough one:
    assume rush hour only; everyplace seems to work politely and nicely offhours
    least courteous: Miami
    most courteous: It's a tie with Seoul and NYC
    For those who disagree about NYC: Friday at 18:00, mad rush, getting on #1 downtown at Columbus Circle and had only #3 train making local stops to Chambers, but announced with inimitable subway dialect. An obvious confused German couple were perplexed. A young member of a widely-denigrated racial composition asked the couple where the wished to go, and told them the train would take them there. As we approached their stop the young man told the couple they had arrived. One prejudice successfully attacked. Only in New York!!
     
  9. KENNECTED
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    Well it's hard to say "country" as a lot of major cities in the US do not have extensive transit systems. Maybe this the question (or sub question) should be "which city has the least polite people?"

    As many have noted, date, time and place is significant factor into how people act on public transportation. I noticed during rush hour, if I'm in NYC, Philly, Cleveland, Chicago, DC (Northeast and Midwest cities were people have good transportation options) people are less tolerant of those that are "clueless" or rude and will let you know what they think.

    I the Southeast and Southwest people are more car dependent and riding public transportation comes across with predetermined stereotyping. (ie. if you ride public transportation your poor, etc.) but the systems aren't as crowded or busy as the NE/MW. and if you ask questions, you're more than likely to get an honest answer and help.

    The west coast cities are a mixed bag.

    I wont comment on foreign countries as I don't want to stereotype since I don't have as extensive experience riding public transportation outside of London and Toronto.
     
  10. cennas
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    Another vote for Singapore. Although I do not think it's only a certain race. It's such a shame to see a first world country but with third-world people lacking common courtesy and decency.
     
  11. doc
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    It's touch for me to judge the US.. perhaps we Americans are.. but I've honestly never had much of a problem .. except for the occassional language difficulties.. people have generally been VERY helpful! :)
     
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  12. DCAview
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    If you're on the subway at rush hour and you're clueless in the sense that you're confused, overwhelmed, lost, I think most New Yorkers are happy to help you (and I found that to be true during my exiles to DC and Philadelphia, too). If you're clueless in the sense that you are completely unaware of the effect your actions have on the hundreds of other people trying to get to their destination on the same train as you (say, by standing in the open doorway at Times Square and refusing to let others on and off), then, yes, we'll let you know that you are inconveniencing others and suggest corrective action.

    (It boggles my mind that people from other cities who would never think of stopping their car in the middle lane of I-85 at rush hour are perfectly fine standing in the doorway of a train while hundreds of people try to stream around them.)
     
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  13. KENNECTED
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    That is what I mean. Those who stand in door and don't move out or step aside to let people board or exit the train or bus or who think their bag(s) deserve a seat more than you do. You know, the inconsiderate a$$hats that make riding mass transit unbearable!
     
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  14. sfo1
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    Experienced rudness today, am in Santiago Chile, and it was my error to try and ride subway at morning rush hour, anyway I did, the trains were packed and I tried to wait for all that were getting off before I got on, but the crowd behind me was pushing me to get on, so I move towards the door, but there was this rather large woman trying to get off, I was standing sideways and she was also, and as she passed me to try and push her way off, she, and this was on this was on purpose, shoved her big a$$ right into my groin, I was quite shocked and not amused. Maybe that was the way she got her thrills, it certainly did nothing for me. Or maybe she had an up and coming interview with the TSA for a job. And don't get me started on people who stand in the door way of a train, or back doorway of a bus when there is plenty of room to stand elsewhere, or people who ware their backpacks instead of taking them off and holding them. These people are only thinking of themselves, they could care less about others, it's the me, me, me syndrom, as a retired transit employee of 30 years I could tell you stories that would be hard to believe.
     
  15. jwsky
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    I am voting for Viet Nam. I can remember people elbowing me to get on a bus first. And stealing my seat on a long distance bus if I got off at a rest stop. I would get the seat back, but had to argue for it. Of course, this was not with everybody in the country. Many people were very nice and polite.
     
  16. ctporter
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    I cannot speak about other than US cities (actually only three using public transports) Manhattan, DC, and Seattle, and I must say the most polite, helpful city is NYC hands down. Ive been in subways in rush hour, and off peak hours, and always I get helped or see others being helped.
     
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  17. ducster
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    +2. As a born and bred New Yorker, this bugged the ---- out of me (still does!). Like when someone gets off an escalator and stops right at the top to figure out where to go next.

    I always observed New Yorkers being very courteous, both on buses and trains in giving up seats for the elderly, pregnant, handicapped, et al. New Yorkers also will help people who are lost and trying to navigate the subway system. One funny story comes to mind: In the subway, an obviously lost tourist asked someone for some help in figuring out which combination of lines to take. The person told her which way to go, whereupon another helpful bystander jumped in to correct the first person. They then started arguing (loudly, but peacefully) about what was the best route. The poor woman just walked away!

    I also find it impossible to generalize, although Paris has not been the friendliest place (on transit- generally we have had great experiences there). People are extremely impatient if you fumble your ticket when you enter the Metro. When we would get on buses (or worse, the Metro) with our stroller, it was a real chore to get people to move out of the way so we could park. And another time on a bus, an elderly man with a cane got on, and nobody gave up their seat, so my daughter and I did. Turned out he was an American who had been living in Paris for a number of years, and he was the inventor of the Star Tours attraction at Disney!
     
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  18. doc
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    Leaving the Javits Ctr today, as I crossed 11th Av, I was asked about getting to "Ground Zero" by a women & her husband in a nice car with Georgia plates.. & a genuine drawl accent that matched.. they were heading uptown, having departed fron the Statue of LIberty .. I said "Wow..wrong way" & asked "you're not headin' to Jersey are you?" They said they were headed off to Maine next & whad anted to try to see the WTC site before they left. I yelled "Maine.. pretty nice country.. lots of lakes.. I hope you got lots of insect repellent!" As I ran off to meet friends at Inc Lounge befor dinner, I thought to myself, they probably think I'm awfully rude! ;)
     
  19. ctporter
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    hmm... this makes me think of my reactions in a TSA line when the people in front of me try to take a filled water bottle or soda bottle, or have something in their suitcase the TSA agents just told everyone in line they could not take through security.... I will have to rethink my impatience quite a bit.
     
  20. Wandering Aramean
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    Yeah, I've been there, done that. :D
     
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