Only in New York. This will give you a chuckle.

Discussion in 'New York Area' started by dhammer53, Nov 3, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. dhammer53
    Original Member

    dhammer53 Gold Member

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  2. MSYgirl

    MSYgirl Gold Member

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    I love it! It makes me miss New York. :( I should be back there in February, hopefully.
     
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  3. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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  4. miles and smiles
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    miles and smiles Gold Member

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  5. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

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    The striped "zebra board" tells the conductor the train is in the right place in the station. The conductor isn't allowed to open the doors unless they are opposite the zebra board since if the train isn't in the proper place in the station and the doors open passengers may fall onto the tracks instead of stumbling onto the station platform. Some stations have more the one zebra board, for example if different models of train stop in the station -- in that case the conductor also needs to be sure the number on the board (e.g. R160) matches the type of train they are operating.

    Technically they are trained to point to the board before the doors open kind of to double-check they're in the right spot. I don't know how many conductors actually do so. I seldom see it done.
     
  6. viguera
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    viguera Gold Member

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    I remember when they introduced that rule back in 1997. The board has been there forever, but after dozens of incidents in 1996 the MTA instituted a new rule that the conductor was supposed to lean out of the window and actually point at the sign.

    I ride the 4-5-6 mostly whenever I'm in the city and I have never seen a conductor not point at the indicator board since the rule was instituted. They might do it nonchalantly, just sort of point in its general direction, but they always point. In some of the stations (especially the curved ones like the old South Ferry or Union Square) the board is the only way they can know if the full train is in the station and in the right spot.
     
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  7. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

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    Pretty sure most of those stations now supplement the conductor's view with video screens, but I'm all for the simple non-tech solutions (like actually paying attention) when they can work.

    1997? Thanks!, didn't know when it started.
     

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