Non raw fish dining in Tsukiji Market

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Dining' started by Sean Colahan, Jun 18, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. Sean Colahan
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    Sean Colahan Gold Member

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    My wife and I are heading to Japan in July. We plan on trying to get in the tuna auction in the early morning and check out the market. I know I have heard people rave about the fresh sushi you can get there, but are there non raw fish options? My wife is pregnant and can not eat raw fish/sushi. Thanks:)
     
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  2. newbluesea
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    newbluesea Gold Member

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    Lots of small restaurants and shops in the adjacent outer market area.
     
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  3. General_Flyer
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    General_Flyer Gold Member

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    In the market is just sushi/sashimi variety with the occasional tamagoyaki.
     
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  4. Terry Yap

    Terry Yap Gold Member

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    yes, there are some non-raw fish dishes in some of the small restaurants if i remember correctly, it's the raw fish restaurants that get really crowded with queues, however, in the morning, just a word of caution, the workers at the market and their vehicles are busy with their chores, so with the crowds and your wife being pregnant, do keep a lookout for slippery areas, vehicles, and the human traffic...:)
     
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  5. flynhwn

    flynhwn Silver Member

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    Try Katsu-chicken or pork. It's a cutlet that she'll like. Okonomiyake is different at every restaurant. It's egg based but taste nothing like an omelet. Lots of options.
     
  6. Sean Colahan
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    Sean Colahan Gold Member

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    Thanks for all the tips. Excited for our upcoming trip:)
     
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  7. newbluesea
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    newbluesea Gold Member

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    OkonomiyakI's base is wheat flour and yam flour (sometimes combined with noodles) the eggs only serve as a sort of additional binder and any variations are due to the ingredients added .. that is why the dish is often called "Japanese pizza" In Osaka there are restaurants that have only that item on the menu, where you order your choice of added ingredients ..just like a pizza.:)
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2014
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  8. estnet
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    estnet Gold Member

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    There are lots of noodle shops a block from the actual market with TONS of small shops, some offered cooked items as well but can't remember what as I was focused on raw. Even the sushi places have some items that are cooked (I didn't go to the actual market arrived later in the day)
     
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  9. DaveRudd

    DaveRudd Active Member

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    If you go early enough for the tuna auction, very few (if any) of the surrounding restaurants will be open. There are a handful of non-raw options at all sushi shops (e.g. cucumber rolls), or -- if you've taken the more expensive omakase option -- you can always ask for aburi (slightly seared). You may get some looks, especially if they're crowded, but you'll also get your finish. Finally, note that pregnant Japanese women eat raw fish all the time. Recommendations are different in the US because the longer, less-controlled supply chain increases the risk of bacterial issues.
     
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  10. WilliamQ

    WilliamQ Gold Member

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    Welcome DaveRudd to MP!
    Indeed "recommendations" can be (and usually are) different in different countries and even just different states.
    Having said that, my wife avoided all kinds of stuff during her two pregnancies due to beliefs and folklores and also internet articles.
    Its usually easier to "avoid" then to partake new stuff
    But she probably also took stuff that may have raised the eyebrows of some during her pregnancies. :)

    Aside, is the market near / accessible from Tokyo Disney hotel?
    I should be staying there with my family (wife and children (age 5 and 7 by then) in December for 6 nights and I do not want to spend all my time at Disneyland.
     
  11. newbluesea
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    newbluesea Gold Member

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    [QUOTE="WilliamQ, post: 2385002, member: 142169
    Aside, is the market near / accessible from Tokyo Disney hotel?
    I should be staying there with my family (wife and children (age 5 and 7 by then) in December for 6 nights and I do not want to spend all my time at Disneyland.[/QUOTE]

    I would'nt be going to Tokyo is visit Disneyland.. period :) The distance to Tsukiji is about 8-10 miles as the crow flies, will require at least two train/subway transfers.
     
  12. estnet
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    estnet Gold Member

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    Do the trains/subways even start early enough for someone to get to the actual market auctions?
     
  13. akuroda

    akuroda Silver Member

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    From some blogs I read, since the auction is very popular for foreign tourist, you should be there around 4am, before the first subways start. And the market is so busy that I'm not so sure it is safe for your wife.
    This is the guide by the market. http://www.shijou.metro.tokyo.jp/pdf/topics/tsukijiguide2.pdf
     
  14. newbluesea
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    newbluesea Gold Member

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    As stated below, no. If one really has to see the auction in process it makes staying at the Conrad (or the Hyatt for that matter) a great advantage.
    Personally I found the auction interesting as a one time experience but not sure I would be rushing to go again. The market itself it a bit more interesting even if visited a bit later in the AM.
     
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  15. General_Flyer
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    The Main Market area, or at least some parts of it are open to the general public after 9. Just a head's up. :)
     
  16. Terry Yap

    Terry Yap Gold Member

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    Agree, visiting the auction would an interesting experience but viewing the market is worthwhile too lots of live seafood such as octopus and tuna which the workers skillfully cut, so depends on your schedule, we had kids and parents in law with us so we didnt really want to rush for the auction and stress everybody up to wake up, it was a vacation
     
  17. Sean Colahan
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    Sean Colahan Gold Member

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    Thanks to everybody for your help and tips! Wife decided to stay in bed at the hotel, but I.made it into one of the 120 spots for the tuna auction. Can't wait for sushi breakfast afterwords:)
     
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