My Galaxy S3 is obsolete

Discussion in 'Travel Technology' started by Gargoyle, Mar 15, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. Gargoyle
    Original Member

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  2. oneeyejack

    oneeyejack Gold Member

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    perhaps you should wait for the announcement of the Nexus 5. ;)
     
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  3. viguera
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    viguera Gold Member

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    Most of the S IV stuff is just gimmicky... having the large screen is nice, but that only means it's starting to get awkward to hold and the battery life will suffer -- yes, in spite of the larger battery.

    The eye tracking based stuff sounds cool, but it's an extension of what is already available in the S3 which rarely works as you want it. Granted when lighting conditions are perfect and face detection is working the "feature" works, but whether or not that can be extended into full fledged "control" of the phone's behavior based on where you're looking is another story. My guess is it's going to be annoying and people will just end up turning it off.

    I think what was interesting was some of the software, which will hopefully make its way down (officially) to the S3. Even if not, I'm sure most of it will end up on the third party ROMs that the community support (my Galaxy Nexus has been running 4.2.2 for months now and has all of the goodies of Jelly Bean, even though the update was just released by Verizon last week).

    Some of the gimmicks are nice, like the "Eraser" feature of the camera where motion is detected and can be removed from a shot based on multiple pictures (so you can remove that guy walking behind your shot in your vacation pictures). Some of the other features... like Air View (stolen from the S Pen) are just stupid and I don't see how you would use them past their initial "trying them out" stage.

    I think overall it will be an interesting device to own, assuming you actually need/want some of the features. If you already own a Nexus device, an HTC ONE or arguably even an S3 then the S4 is only better "on paper" and I certainly wouldn't pay a premium to own one. With that said, it does have a nice price point, so it's worth it, if you could get it at that cost -- without having to pay an early termination fee or anything of the sort.
     
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  4. AUSsie

    AUSsie Silver Member

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    This may be blasphemous, but I don't even have a smartphone. I got annoyed when I had no choice but to get a phone with a camera on it to replace my old phone. (I work in an industry where having recording devices on you is frowned upon)
     
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  5. Gargoyle
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    are you implying (OMG!) that you use your phone to make.... dare I say it, ... phone calls?
    Wow, that is so 2009.

    ( I won't be surprised if one of these days, while upgrading feature sets, a phone manufacturer forgets to include "voice communication")
     
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  6. AUSsie

    AUSsie Silver Member

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    Amazing, I know. All of the breathless marketing around new phones doesn't really reach me, I suppose. Why exactly do I need 8 cores of processing power in my phone? What exactly does this enable me to do that I can't already do with the other devices I already have?
     
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  7. viguera
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    viguera Gold Member

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    The S4 in the US will get a Qualcomm 4 core processor because there's a compatibility issue with the Octa hardware and the LTE modem. This is the same that happened with the S3, where the international version had a different CPU.

    With that said, multi-core processing allows the CPU to scale performance better and still provide good battery life. When you don't demand much from the phone it doesn't use much of the hardware, perhaps using 2 cores at 300MHz.

    When you have a CPU intensive task going on -- multiple apps, games or the like, everything wakes up and runs at full speed -- and takes your battery to hell with it.
     
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  8. kyunbit
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    kyunbit Silver Member

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    My phone is a rugged Nokia phone of circa 2005 that holds charge for 5 days. After a lot of deliberation, I have chosen to be without a 'smart'phone. I don't need to check my emails/Facebook every 5 minutes. When I am traveling, there are some cases where I feel having an internet connection would have helped. I just call up a credit card concierge/friend in that case.

    I had a 'smart'phone for about a month. Dropped and broke it, never looked back.

    Oh and the $30 I save per month on data charges, I donate to support the education of two children.
     
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