Mobile privacy expectations

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by KENNECTED, Feb 24, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. KENNECTED
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    KENNECTED Silver Member

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  2. MyTravels
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    MyTravels Silver Member

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    I believe that the complainer was (presumably voluntarily) moved. Moving the the viewer really doesn't make sense unless there was an entire row open (unlikely as the complainer was moved to a middle seat) and I'm not the crew has legitimate grounds to force the viewer to move.

    Not dismissing the womans point, but making outlandish claims severely diminishes her credibility:
    "I believe the man should have been moved. I believe his behavior was criminal." (emphasis mine)
     
  3. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    In reading this article, it appears that the person who complained was reassigned.

    Although the article's author (Christopher Elliott) offers the following tips to those who want to view objectionable material everywhere they travel:
    • Get a window seat. It gives you the advantage of rotating your computer screen for more privacy.
    • Dim your computer screen. It will draw less attention to your screen and also prevent ambient light leaking into the neighboring seats.
    • Get to know your seatmate. "If a younger passenger is next to me I will be more considerate of what is on my screen," says Murphy.
    • Flip between tabs. Use the hot keys for quickly switching between tabs. On a Mac, it's CMD+TAB; on a PC, CTRL+TAB.

    The obvious choice that Mr. Elliott somehow neglects to mention is:
    - just don't do it!
    Why do fellow passengers need to be subjected to clearly objectionable material in the first place? After all, isn't the title of this article:
    Planes, trains aren't screening rooms!
     
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  4. foxberg

    foxberg Gold Member

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    I agree. And if you want to watch something you know you shouldn't in public just get a VR glasses and view the content in total privacy.
     
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  5. KENNECTED
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    KENNECTED Silver Member

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    I think you guys misunderstood my post. I aware, what the article says, I was restating and agree that the "complainer" should have been reassigned. They have the "issue", so they should either suck it up and stay or request a move.
     
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  6. KENNECTED
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    KENNECTED Silver Member

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    I don't agree with that. You can't tell someone how and when (outside of airline instructions) they should use their device. Where does it stop?

    If person is going to view something (porn) that other in close proximity may find offensive or questionable, then the viewer/owner of the device should be VERY discreet.

    I have a tablet and I download movies to watch on flights. If I'm watching an R rated movie with action, violence, adult situations and possibly nudity, they should look away. If I'm in MY seat, why is(are) my rowmate(s) watching MY device?

    I'm typically in the window seat (in First or Business First). I always use headphone and typically the screen is close up. I've never had a person say anything to me, if they do, I'm prepared to calmy say, "look the other way!"
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2014
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  7. foxberg

    foxberg Gold Member

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    Just imagine someone watching Salo on the plane.
     
  8. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    You (and I) are entitled to our opinions. BLUF, the airlines are running a business. As such, they can and do institute rules for the use of their services. The airlines also have the ability to decide what is acceptable behavior for a passenger and what is not. Most anything outside of those boundaries can be subject to continuing debate.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2014
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  9. LarryInNYC

    LarryInNYC Gold Member

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    Darn tootin!

    Just the other day, someone had the temerity to demand I turn off my cell phone! They were really rude about it too -- something about not being able to hear the dialog. The worst part was that the usher took their side! Same thing happened when I was making a VOIP call to my hearing-challenged great-uncle on a flight the other day. Seriously, it's the only time I can get 90 minutes straight to call the old guy and why shouldn't I make use of it?
     
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