MIA-NRT

Discussion in 'American Airlines | AAdvantage' started by joejones, Feb 17, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. joejones
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    joejones Silver Member

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    There has been a lot of speculation about this route coming to the AA network at some point, and apparently it is in the works, at least according to this article in The Street.

    Heck of a flight, though...

    map.gif
     
  2. Tenmoc
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    Tenmoc Gold Member

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    The map shows just how bad the winds on this would be. I'd like to see it as wining down to MIA would be nice for extra eqm, but I would be surprised if we see this any time soon.
     
  3. HNL
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    HNL Gold Member

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    I'm sure we'll see AA or JL on the JRT-MIA route. It's a matter of time.
     
    gemac likes this.
  4. Could AA's 772's make this route?
     
  5. Microwave
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    Microwave Silver Member

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    I don't believe this could be done economically. With required reserves and divert time, there would be very little room for headwinds--the polar jetstream can frequently get well over 100kt in speed, and it primarily occurs at altitudes flown by commercial airliners. It also tends to be worse right along the great circle route in the OP (across AK, down Canada into the CONUS), putting much of that wind at or near the nose (as opposed to abeam the bird, which would have much less of an impact on range). Even a moderate headwind for part of the route could push the flight into severe weight restrictions or even force a fuel stop, and the sheer length of the flight would make it more difficult to accurately plan for winds several hours into the future. If fuel became an issue mid-flight, it could force fuel stops in AK, on the way to an outstation, pushing delays onto return flights that couldn't be absorbed like might be possible by shuffling equipment at a hub. Overall, I don't believe AA's 777-200ER birds could make this route reliably and profitably. The forthcoming 777-300ER could probably do much better on the route, with extra range and added payload capacity.
     
    Sarah likes this.
  6. That was my thinking as well.
     
  7. Axey
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    Axey Silver Member

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    I agree.
     
  8. PresRDC

    PresRDC Active Member

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    ORD-DEL is a little longer than MIA-NRT.
     
  9. Microwave
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    Microwave Silver Member

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    Your use of the great circle mapper has told you only part of the story: ORD-DEL is indeed further, but it does not fly directly into the polar jetstream. Airplanes aren't like cars; if an aircraft flies at 500kt airspeed for an hour into a 100kt headwind, it's only covered 400 nautical miles. A car that drives 60mph into a 10mph headwind has still covered 60 miles in 1 hour. Since ORD-DEL doesn't hit those fierce winds head-on (it flies almost directly over the north pole), it's much easier to both plan for and provision for the trip. MIA-NRT westbound would encounter severe headwinds most of the year for much of the journey, almost directly at the nose. With required reserves and divert time (which add even more fuel as those reserves have to be flown the distance of the route, so headwinds mean not just more fuel to fly through them but more fuel to fly the reserves through them too), MIA-NRT westbound is much more difficult to operationalize than ORD-DEL.
     

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