Make booking for others to use, enjoying benefits?

Discussion in 'Hyatt | Gold Passport' started by jfhscott, Feb 19, 2012.  |  Print Topic

  1. jfhscott
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    jfhscott Silver Member

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    I'm already at 8 stays this year, so I am certain I need to resort to no shenanigans to retain diamond. a colleague is in a different boat.

    She, well call her Jane Doe, suggests making reservations in her name, listing "John Smith" as a registered guest. Jane's name and CC guarantee the reservation, but John Smith arrives, saying Jane Doe is to arrive late, and he would like to check in with his CC. Of course, diamond benefits apply to his stay. And she gets the points and stay/night credit, and might be 1000 miles away. Trust me, I know this Jane Doe, and you don't want her in your room!

    Consistent with established tradition, when I've travelled booking more than one room, some hyatts have generously accorded diamond benefits to two rooms I have booked. This is no secret or scandal as I understand.

    But something about the sceme of my colleague (with whom I am circumspect at all times) is troubling. First, she is directing traffic to Hyatt, which I suppose is "loyal". But it allows her to perpetuate diamond when she might otherwise lose it. This dilutes diamond for those who have earned it as I and others have. It also rips Hyatt off. Hyatt Diamond is gracious enough that I do care to rip them off through shenanigans. (Another FFN would increase my tendency to protect them!).

    With this said, how plausible is the scheme? I can see it working in the US, where proprties will typically permit a registered guest on a reservation to check in, but what about properties which require a passport (e.g. Bangkok) and eventually would anticipate seeing Jane Doe? I dunno how this gets policed, but it presents an interesting academic question to me.
     
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  2. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    I am not a fan of this. It effectively transfers Diamond benefits to someone who didn't earn them and also makes earning status easier (I guess a win-win from the perspective of the two parties involved)

    If this scheme becomes more popular (clearly it's not new if you read various threads on the other board, maybe here as well), properties might fight back and deny the "check-in without-primary-person" benefit that some people legitimately might want to use for their spouse arriving separately and early. Unfortunately I am not sure whether properties have other options -- could they, for example, charge the person who actually stayed at the property the rack rate for the room and the Diamond who made the reservation for a no-show if they request the Diamond to present him/herself at the front desk and he/she doesn't ever show up?
     
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  3. jfhscott
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    jfhscott Silver Member

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    I'm not in favor of it other. And if you knew my colleague "Jane Doe", you'd not be in favor of anything which might benefit her.

    I do wonder where she might be too ambitious - would security checks in Japan and China expose the scam. As you can tell, me not especially a fan of Jane Doe, and if real, relatively innocent, people going to China were not implicated, I'd love to have them come back telling Jane that everything fell apart and they had to sleep on the street.

    My guess is that in the US, all would work out fine.
     
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  4. FriendlySkies
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    FriendlySkies Gold Member

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    As long as Jane Doe lists Guest #2 on the reservation, they shouldn't have any problems checking-in.

    What security checks are you speaking of?
     
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  5. MSPeconomist
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    AFAIK if this works, Jane Doe's name would appear on the receipt. It could be embarrassing to submit this for reimbursement and be asked about why the room was shared with Jane Doe. Does this violate company policy about romantic relationships with coworkers? Does anyone in the chain who would see the receipt know Mrs. John Smith and would they be inclined to tell her about her husband's affair at work?
     
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  6. kyunbit
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    kyunbit Silver Member

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    Exactly! This is fraud! I know somebody who does the same with Marriott
     
  7. MSPeconomist
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    I wish hotel chains had loss prevention units like airlines to track and punish such abuses. Even if it's "just" a matter of transferring benefits to a spouse, this is clearly wrong and can lead to a loss of benefits enjoyed by honest elites. Off with their heads!
     
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  8. cennas
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    cennas Gold Member

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    I stayed at the GH Shenzhen last year with my gf. We had traveled separately and I arrived first so was checking in alone. The Club manager told me they would need to see my gf's passport when she arrived. When I asked why, she said that it was required by the authorities to take photocopies of the passports of all the registered occupants of the room. And every time I was in the lounge, she kept reminding me to produce my gf's passport until I did the next morning.
     
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  9. MSPeconomist
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    This seems excessive. What if someone discretely wants who the room is shared with not to be part of any record? I would have thought that perhaps knowing who is in the hotel could help to identify victims in case of fire or building collapse, but the photocopies presumably would be lost then too.
     
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  10. cennas
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    cennas Gold Member

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    Maybe this was because I put "2 persons" in the reservation? I suppose if someone was staying discreetly with another person, he/she would just make the reservation for 1 and check-in alone. A couple of months later at the GH Guangzhou, they also took a photocopy of my passport, although that time I was staying alone.
     
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  11. MSPeconomist
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    I certainly show my passport at checkin in China, but I've never been aware that a photocopy was made and I don't remember the desk holding the passport like in Russia to register the visa or something.
     
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  12. cennas
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    Maybe different chains have different practice? Or different "authorities" have different practice? IIRC, they only took copies of the data page and not the visa or the immigration departure card.
     
  13. jfhscott
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    jfhscott Silver Member

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    It has not happened domestically, but at various foreign hotels, I have had to produce a passport, which typically gets photocopied
     
  14. FriendlySkies
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    FriendlySkies Gold Member

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    I've had my passport copied at all foreign hotels (Australia, Brazil, England, France, Germany, Japan, South Korea, etc). In Shanghai, I was sharing the room with a friend, and they asked for both of our passports. However, when I got the final bill, his name was not on it.
     
  15. Jeanne23

    Jeanne23 Silver Member

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    I bet instead of that, they might suspend her status. Hyatt would have reason to believe she earned it through fraud. If there's ever a mistake (for some reason someone falls off the reservation?) it will be really awkward to fix, especially if Jane Doe is elsewhere and perhaps even unavailable by phone. I wonder if they'd flag her in the future.
     
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  16. MSPeconomist
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    I've stayed in different chains as well as some local or independent hotels in different areas of China.
     
  17. MSPeconomist
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    I'm sure my passport has never been photocopied in Australia, England, France, Germany, or Japan. Maybe they just do it for citizens of countries requiring visas. I also don't think it was done in ROK, but I don't remember whether they could have kept the passport briefly and copied it them. I've never been to Brazil so I cannot comment on that one.
     
  18. MSPeconomist
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    Most of the time when I show the passport, they just glance at it briefly and it doesn't leave my sight. I've never been in the habit of leaving my passport with the hotel and I make a point of trying to retrieve it ASAP, before even walking out into the neighborhood around the hotel.
     
  19. MSPeconomist
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    They could also charge the person for the value of the elite benefits at an inflated price, such as room service plus delivery and service charge for the Hyatt Diamond welcome F&B amenity and guest fees for each lounge visit.

    More importantly, they could cancel the frequent sleeper account of the higher level elite who willingly participates in this fraud.
     
  20. Jeanne23

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    Some countries just have rules that hotels have to photocopy travelers' passports. I know this is true in Vietnam, whether you need a visa or not. I wonder if some hotels without this law copy it as a precaution for the benefit of the traveler. If your passport is stolen, they'll have a copy on file just in case.
     
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  21. Jeanne23

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    If you stay more than 7 days in Russia, they have to hang onto it to register it, which makes me really worried! (Especially since Russia also takes a really long time on visas in the first place, I don't trust them to get me my passport back on time).
     
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  22. MSPeconomist
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    As you can see, I mentioned Russia as being an exception IME unthread. I usually tell the hotel at checkin that I will need to have the passport back soon and it's been available to me within an hour. However, I'm not sure when I last stayed in a single hotel there for a whole week, although I thought the hotel registered the passport/visa for shorter stays too.
     
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  23. Jeanne23

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    I'll try saying that the next time I am there, thanks. It's taken really long in the past, but I did long stays in one hotel.
     
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  24. MSPeconomist
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    In principle, Russian police can stop you for no reason and demand proof of identity, but I've been told that when such hassles happen, it's usually really a request for a bribe. More significantly, if you change money, you must have the passport.
     
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