Luggage

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by andhoova, Oct 15, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. andhoova

    andhoova Silver Member

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    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
  2. moongoddess

    moongoddess Silver Member

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    What airlines will you be flying? Is this a trip in the US, or overseas? Many foreign carriers are as concerned about carryon weight as they are about size. Briggs and Riley makes awesome luggage, but it does tend to be heavy. Check your airlines to see what restrictions they put on carryon weight; if they are very restrictive, consider getting a very lightweight travel duffel or backpack instead of a wheeled carryone. (Wheels add weight!)
     
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  3. andhoova

    andhoova Silver Member

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    Well I travel regularly so this will be replacing my old Samsonite luggage. Specifically, I wi use this initially for a trip to Argentina
     
  4. moongoddess

    moongoddess Silver Member

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    Compare the weight of your current Samsonite to the Briggs and Riley case you're looking at. If they are close, and the Samsonite works for you, than buy the Briggs and Riley case with confidence. I have a 26" Briggs and Riley suitcase, and the damned thing is indestructible! (Although if the baggage maulers ever do find a way to damage it, Briggs and Riley will repair it under warranty for as long as I own the suitcase. Can't beat that warranty!) If the Briggs and Riley is appreciably heavier, then consider what airlines you fly and if that added bit of weight will be a problem before you purchase it.. The heavier weight of Briggs and Riley luggage is literally its only drawback. You can't buy a better-made bag.
     
  5. andhoova

    andhoova Silver Member

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    Could someone explain the difference between the 2 bags mentioned above. One is domestic carry-on and the other is international carry-on but both have the same capacity (44.6L). I frequently travel domestic and international. Which will work for both?
     
  6. bigx0

    bigx0 Gold Member

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    You sure they're the same capacity? I get very different numbers. The 125CX doesn't list capacity but just multiplying the dimensions out I get 3888 cu in for the 125CX and 2480 cu in for the 121 (which is below the stated capacity for it BTW -- I guess they figure you will overstuff it).
     
  7. andhoova

    andhoova Silver Member

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    @bigx0 - My bad, one of them was an incorrect link. I added the correct ones. I'm looking at the Domestic Carry On Expandable Upright (U122CX) OR the International Carry On Expandable Wide body Upright (U121CXW). Both say they have 44.6L of capacity.

    thanks
     
  8. jonspencer

    jonspencer Silver Member

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    I use the Rimowa 29 litre Pilot metal, not quite as good a warranty as Briggs but quite decent and the case is indestructible but easily dented. The Zero Halliburton bags look cool too but I have never tried them.

    Then I have the Rimowa 89 litre Classic Flight (5.6 kg) 78 x 52 x 27 cm
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
  9. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    I guess that it all depends upon how much you plan on carrying on board and how much you plan on checking - both in terms of size and weight. For international travel (to bring gifts for friends and family in both directions), we prefer our Tumi XL duffles. I was able to get one earlier this year for ~30% off full price during a Tumi sale. The newer ones are "taller" than my 5-6-year-old XL Tumi duffle, and therefore have a greater volume. And, amazingly, the newer duffles are lighter than the old ones, while also are made of a ripstop composite material that's near indestructible. In ~350K+ miles of international travel, the only damage I've had with my old Tumi duffle has been when the zipper pulls were ripped off - likely by overzealous TSA folks looking for contraband that's not there! And I sent the bag to Tumi for repair, they replaced the pulls, and made the bag look new, at no charge (except for my shipping costs)! :)
    For a carry-on, I much prefer my trusty backpack (I've gone through a few different ones), and much prefer a backpack over a roll-on. But, if you add an expandable roll-on along with a backpack, you could carry a week's worth of clothes onboard. :)
     
  10. othermike27

    othermike27 Silver Member

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    Depends on what you mean by "work" I guess.

    We got the B&R international carry-ons for a trip to europe earlier this year. The international version is shorter but wider than the domestic bag, and therefore more likely to fit easily into most overhead bins (not some regional jets, though). But an efficient (or maybe officious) Lufthansa gate agent saw us waiting for our flight and asked us to check them anyway. And they were over their weight limit for carry-ons. So, both sizes work nicely, the international ones are easier to fit in overhead bins, but beware the tightening carry-on rules. We are very happy with the B&R luggage, but still make use of our old Travelpro set, depending on circumstances.
     
  11. andhoova

    andhoova Silver Member

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