Low fuel forces Qantas A380 to divert

Discussion in 'Qantas Airways | Frequent Flyer' started by Infinite1K, May 17, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. Infinite1K
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    Infinite1K Silver Member

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  2. Pinkmoose
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    Pinkmoose Silver Member

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    Qantas has released a statement that it was due to headwinds which caused the plane to burn more fuel than normal.
    Isn't this something they should have factored into their flight plans??
     
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  3. Globaliser
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    Actual winds can be different after departure from the forecast winds on which flight planning and fuel loading were based.
     
  4. Pinkmoose
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    Pinkmoose Silver Member

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    True, I can understand that weather conditions can be unpredictable at times, however the difference between SIN-ADL and SIN-MEL is less than 400 miles.
    I would have thought that there would be a reserve of fuel onbaord.

    However if I was a passenger on this plane I would have been more than happy to land and refuel than run out of fuel mid-air :p
     
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  5. Globaliser
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    A number of different kinds of reserves, some of which cannot be burnt.

    What a media report like this doesn't tell you is what else was factored in to the decision. For example, higher than planned fuel burn, taken together with expected poor weather conditions at MEL (= higher possibility of having to hold, or to divert from MEL to another port after holding), might have left the aircraft with a fuel state that was just too close for comfort - particularly if perhaps ADL was clearly open for business with no issues. Adding that combination together could make it make sense to drop in for a fuel stop rather than risk painting yourself into a fuel state corner.
     
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  6. NYBanker
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    NYBanker Gold Member

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    It is infrequent, but situations like this will happen. While there is ample excess fuel loaded on to a flight, circumstances of the route (weather, the route itself, etc) may change. One of the factors in determining the amount of excess are the number of suitable fields along the route. ADL provides a logical pitstop for the rare occasion of a potentially low fuel situation on the SIN-MEL service.

    Recall a BA Concorde ran out of fuel moments after landing at LHR a while back. Not so good.
     

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