Kangaroo as an emotional support animal

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by MSPeconomist, Feb 3, 2015.  |  Print Topic

  1. MSPeconomist
    Original Member

    MSPeconomist Gold Member

    Messages:
    58,563
    Likes Received:
    98,528
    Status Points:
    20,020
    A local CBS station is reporting that a Wisconsin woman was kicked out of a fast food restaurant for bringing a kangaroo that she claimed was her emotional support animal. She apparently even had a letter from a doctor about the need for her kangaroo to be with her.

    McDonalds employees apparently called the police when she didn't leave. The local cop asked her to leave and she did. One wonders whether it was legal to keep a kangaroo where she lives, assuming that she didn't have a special permit for it. One also wonders how a person in the USA with no apparent zoo or wildlife connections could purchase a kangaroo or otherwise acquire one, especially a very young one. Plus, what happens when it's older in a year or two and cannot be kept inside her house?

    I wonder if there will be a lawsuit.

    The kangaroo was desccribed as being young and small, although apparently not a newborn. It was covered in a blanket and held in a "baby carrier" which I suspect might mean a car seat (so at least the animal was safe in her vehicle).

    I probably like kangaroos more than most people in that I'm fascinated by the opportunity to enter their enclosures, pet them, and feed them in some Australian zoos and wildlife centers. I really like them, but I wouldn't want the responsibility of raising one in my home. OTOH, I can understand that a kangaroo would provide more emotional support than some animals, such as snakes, pigs, and geese, ever could.
     
    jackplum likes this.
  2. jackplum
    Original Member

    jackplum Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,222
    Likes Received:
    3,212
    Status Points:
    1,970
    What do you have against pigs??? They are very intelligent. Who wouldn't love a teacup pig? (Though in all fairness they grow up to be big!)

    Geese are just plain cantankerous.

    Though I would love a wallaby


    I have a feeling something will come about with this legally or in a settlement. If a medical professional gave the "ok," I don't think there is much recourse for the establishment considering the ADA.

    Wait and see!
     
  3. jackplum
    Original Member

    jackplum Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,222
    Likes Received:
    3,212
    Status Points:
    1,970
    Just spoke to my daughter who is up on the ADA

    Emotional support animals are not afforded the same protections as a service animal.
     
    Gargoyle likes this.
  4. MSPeconomist
    Original Member

    MSPeconomist Gold Member

    Messages:
    58,563
    Likes Received:
    98,528
    Status Points:
    20,020
    I guess I prefer critters with fur (or animals that taste good, so by this criterion pigs and geese would be OK, although I prefer wild boar and duck).
     
    timfrost and jackplum like this.
  5. jackplum
    Original Member

    jackplum Gold Member

    Messages:
    1,222
    Likes Received:
    3,212
    Status Points:
    1,970
    I don't think a wild boar would be an acceptable emotional support animal anywhere!
     
  6. Gargoyle
    Original Member

    Gargoyle Milepoint Guide

    Messages:
    22,014
    Likes Received:
    96,541
    Status Points:
    20,020
    That's discrimination.
    It is in Wisconsin (where the incident in the OP took place)- they even have one for governor. :eek:
     
    timfrost, Sammich and jackplum like this.
  7. timfrost

    timfrost Silver Member

    Messages:
    401
    Likes Received:
    704
    Status Points:
    625
    This comes up ALL THE TIME on the train, and Amtrak has trained us to just ignore the issue in general as a pandora's box unless the animal is causing a ruckus, disturbing other passengers, or is not housebroken. The first two are the single most obvious indication that the animal in question is not a properly trained service animal - such an animal would never bark/growl at numerous other patrons or chew on seat cushions. It is only in these cases Amtrak has any recourse in denying an animal boarding or removing it from the train. Other than that they've made it very clear that this subject is pretty much untouchable and to just let the service animal and their handler ride to their destination. I've seen a service pig, numerous cats, a duck, and even a snake. It's all a bunch of phony baloney BS if you ask me and it removes a lot of credibility from those with genuine disabilities. Sometimes we end up with so many animals on board we have trouble providing reasonable accommodations for everyone, and that makes it very unfair for anyone with an actual disability.

    Fortunately, I think this is all going to come to a head very soon. The people who have actual service animals are becoming more and more intolerant of the imposters and I think their push will be for requiring documentation in the near future. Under the ADA businesses cannot request documentation of a service animal, but if enough people with legitimate service animals push lawmakers for it, the law could be changed. Just my two cents.

    Under title II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, a service animal can ONLY be a dog:

    A service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Tasks performed can include, among other things, pulling a wheelchair, retrieving dropped items, alerting a person to a sound, reminding a person to take medication, or pressing an elevator button.

    Emotional support animals, comfort animals, and therapy dogs are not service animals under Title II and Title III of the ADA. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not considered service animals either. The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability. It does not matter if a person has a note from a doctor that states that the person has a disability and needs to have the animal for emotional support. A doctor’s letter does not turn an animal into a service animal.

    While Emotional Support Animals or Comfort Animals are often used as part of a medical treatment plan as therapy animals, they are not considered service animals under the ADA. These support animals provide companionship, relieve loneliness, and sometimes help with depression, anxiety, and certain phobias, but do not have special training to perform tasks that assist people with disabilities. Even though some states have laws defining therapy animals, these animals are not limited to working with people with disabilities and therefore are not covered by federal laws protecting the use of service animals. Therapy animals provide people with therapeutic contact, usually in a clinical setting, to improve their physical, social, emotional, and/or cognitive functioning.
     
    WilliamQ and Gargoyle like this.

Share This Page