Jet lag - Provigil / Nuvigil ?

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by govtmule, Nov 8, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. govtmule

    govtmule Active Member

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    Does anyone use Provigil (armodafinil) or Nuvigil (modafinil) to combat jet lag?

    I've read about the increasing use of both for this purpose.
    I'm wondering if anyone here has any experience with it.

    It's what the military and law enforcement agencies use when they need to be wakeful and alert, but they don't have the adverse side effects of most stimulants. Obama is even reported to take it when he travels.

    It is off-label use, but I figured with all the traveling going on here that some must be trying it.
     
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  2. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Thanks for the tip! I'm personally leery of off-label pharmaceutical use. A few physician friends are larger proponents of off-label use, and would likely try this on their own, so I'll need to enquire about Provigil and Nuvigil. As for me, a great wine or premium liquor often seems to help to catch up on sleep deprivation! ;)
     
  3. TurtleMan

    TurtleMan Member

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    I've taken Adrafinil during long flights and trips. I have found that it does help me keep alert and wakeful afterwords so if there is an off chance that I am pretty much "flying into a meeting" I can still be functional and coherent while there.

    There isn't too much to be wary of in the off-label pharmaceutical use. Most of them have some prescription drug they are closely related to, and often are precursors for them. Still, do your due diligence and research regarding any "nootropic" or chemical you are about to start using.
     
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  4. Randy Petersen
    Original Member

    Randy Petersen Founder

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    One of our members who is also a great blogger for such things might have some additional info for you. I recall this blog post from a few years ago that he wrote. Calling @Wandering Aramean
     
  5. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    I'm impressed that you remembered, Randy!

    I did participate in the clinical trials where they attempted to get the drug approved for the jetlag indication. I think that they probably would have succeeded had the testing/evaluation regimen not been craptacular, but that's based on my wholly non-scientific analysis and no actual experience in that aspect of the industry.

    Because it was a double blind study I have no idea which of the dosages I was on during the trial (we were told some of us got 10mg, some got 5mg and some got placebo). I'm pretty sure that I was on the 10mg tabs and that was WAY too high a dosage for me. On day two I was jittery and could barely keep my hads from shaking/trembling while sitting in the room with my new friends doing a jigsaw puzzle. It was a bit disconcerting. I have no doubt that the tabs work for increasing alertness and such. I'd just be careful about repeated usage and pay attention to the way your body behaves on it. I say the same thing to people when I recommend Ambien for sleeping on planes. Take it in a controlled environment first, just in case.
     
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  6. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    Thanks for sharing this information, and for referencing the ABC News article!

    I will remain apolitical, but politely ask the question as to how our former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton logged ~1,000,000 air miles in 4 years as Secretary of State without at least some pharmaceutical assistance? ;)
     
  7. Wandering Aramean
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    Wandering Aramean Gold Member

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    I've done 200K annually the past 4 years and rarely take drugs as part of my routine. And I do a lot of my travel in economy. I would not be too surprised to learn that she managed just fine either way.
     
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  8. Pizzaman
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    Pizzaman Co-founder

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    Yeah, I'm close to 200K (though significantly less of it in Economy than Seth) and I don't take any meds, even for long flights. That being said, my body seems to like falling asleep when the engines cycle up for takeoff, though it can sometimes be moody about it in coach. ;)
     
  9. Newscience

    Newscience Gold Member

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    ;)
    That is indeed a great ability! ;) And, as invariably most of my miles are in coach, it's tough for me to catch those needed zzz's. :oops:

    I suspect that you're right! :cool:

    But, I've found that getting even 3 hours sleep on a 8-9+ hour flight can make all the difference in the world for me. And I just can't do this in coach. Let's face it, if you've got a tight connection to make "over the pond", and not all the signage in the airport is in English, being tired doesn't help you make your flight. :eek: Nor is it fun to negotiate through Day #1 of being in a time zone of 5 or more hours difference. :(

    The best trick that you can do is try to get your body to stay on the "new time zone" for your entire stay when overseas. I'm often O.K. for Day #2, but my body just wants to wake up at odd hours. And, for some reason, I never have any problem getting readjusted to "home time" upon return, that only takes a day or two... ;)
     
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  10. mochishiro

    mochishiro Active Member

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    actually it is not off label as use as there is an FDA indication for shift work disorder - which technically is what you are doing when you are traveling across multiple time zones for business. it is much cleaner and safer than using stimulant type energy drinks (red bull, 5 hr energy) or even coffee (which can raise blood pressure, cause rapid heartrate and palpitations). nuvigil is the active "isomer" of provigil. provigil is made of 2 mirror molecules - an active and inactive half. nuvigil only contains this active half so the dosing for provigil will be equivalent to 1/2 the dose of nuvigil.

    nuvigil will increase alertness and improve focus and concentration - it's been used "off-label" to treat ADHD and even used to improve memory with some alzheimer's patients. there is no stimulant effect, and you will feel no buzz or hyperactive energy rush feeling - no jitteriness. it is an interesting feeling as your body will feel physically tired, but your mind will be alert so you can function and do your work - hence the use with law enforcement, military, and obama. if you drink a lot of caffeine, the effects of the caffeine will be potentiated by the nuvigil. nuvigil lasts 12-15 hours and is taken first thing in the morning - that way you have a productive day and by night, you are ready to sleep. there is no "crash" after 3-4 hours like drinking coffee.

    i find it interesting that people will talk negatively about using medication and "drugs" but have no problems (ab)using CNS (central nervous system) stimulants and CNS depressants like caffeine and alcohol :)
     
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  11. TurtleMan

    TurtleMan Member

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    I personally stick with Adrafinil as it's readily available for me and doesn't require a prescription. I've been taking Neuro Force - Adrafinil for a while now, mostly in the mornings after a late night. But when ever I do fly, I take some before landing to help combat any form of sleepiness or grogginess associated with jet lag. There's other great nootropics out there that I take too after flying, like Phenylpiracetam to help stimulate my mind and help me take care of any business I need to immediately after landing.
     
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  12. jonspencer

    jonspencer Silver Member

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    using these pills as a one-off is probably fine but I travel long-haul every month and there is no way I would get in the habit of taking pills all year.

    my biggest help in feeling well is not eating or drinking alcohol on the plane and for as long as I can hold out after landing
     
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  13. Pizzaman
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    Something I practice as well. I rarely drink on domestic flights. The older I get the less I can handle my liquor.
     
  14. mochishiro

    mochishiro Active Member

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    taking pills is not natural - then again, neither is shooting your body up to 30,000 ft flying 600 miles per hour across 2 time zones :)
     
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  15. jsmith10128

    jsmith10128 New Member

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    Yes, I use Modafinil - modalert brand which comes from India is a generic and much cheaper. It can be found with a little research (google) Its an absolute miracle drug. I fly to Hong Kong, take one sleeping pill to help the flight. Get there and can take this pill in the morning and go to a meeting at 9am and feel zero jet lag. It literally removes the jet lag and helps you feel clear and refreshed. Coffee cannot do this, its completely different. The strange thing is that if i drink to much coffee i have a rough detox from it a few days later when I stop, headaches, tired etc. Modafinil, nothing like this. I buy 200 mg and take half for the days I am there. You dont feel jumpy or wired like coffee does. The key is that it dehydrates you so drink lots of water or you will get a headache, if you do drink water it will go away. 2nd, and most important, do not take it after 10am in the morning or you wont sleep until 2am. Its time released. The first time you take it you will feel a bit like you had a strong cup of coffee for the first hour or so then it fades away but keeps working, ie you are not tired or jet lagged, just feel normal (which is amazing because with a 12 hour time difference you should feel anything but normal) Its not coffee, I gave some to a friend and warned him not to but he topped up a bit after a few hours and then sent me a text at 4am asking how do you turn the stuff off as he cant sleep. If you take early in the morning you will fall asleep normally at around 11pm. For the purists out there who dont take drugs of any kind, I assume you mean coffee too, because modafinil to me is the strength of coffee, but works better. Its almost like you took a cup of coffee that does not drop its strength for 12 - 15 hours but does not have the jitter effect. One more thing. If you drink alcohol on it you will become very chatty, so its good if you are out in a club etc, but if you are drinking with clients etc, dont have more than one drink or you will become a little talkative. I would not travel on business without it and I can assure you that govt officials all take it for their big trips. I am in tech and everyone around here uses it even when they are not travelling, but for travelling with big time difference, its a must.
     
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