Japanese Tourists Balk at Paying Top Dollar in Hawaii for Sub-Par Customer Service

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by uggboy, Aug 5, 2014.  |  Print Topic

  1. uggboy
    Original Member

    uggboy Gold Member

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    Japanese Tourists Balk at Paying Top Dollar in Hawaii for Sub-Par Customer Service

     
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  2. Mapsmith
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    Mapsmith Gold Member

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    Seems like this entire problem may actually be infrastructure rather than customer service. As the article pointed out, the Japanese have complaints about the Front Desk and Cleanliness. Considering that the Asian Hotels mentioned have been put up in relatively recent years, while the Hawaiian Hotels have been around for a couple of decades, the cleanliness may be due to weathering and use of the actual infrastructure. (a little paint, new beds, even replacing the baseboards in the hallways can renovate a look.) Front Desks have become more informal at the newer properties. Lighter woods, comfy chairs, etc, can change people's view. A stark Desk with a barrier may be off-putting.

    So rather than look at customer service, maybe the tourism group should look at the "image" presented.

    But retraining the Customer service people (which still isn't a bad Idea) is cheaper.

    Just my opinion.
     
  3. socalgecko

    socalgecko Silver Member

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    I'm inclined to agree with Mapsmith. I spent a night in Waikiki at the Sheraton Princess Kaiulani and all I can say is that it's no surprise they're knocking that place down next year. There were far more Japanese & Korean visitors passing through the place than any other nationality, and I overheard several conversations in Japanese about how gross the hotel was. I heard the word "hidoi" thrown around more than a few times.
     
  4. Jimgotkp
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    Jimgotkp Gold Member

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    If the customer service isn't good, it's because the employees aren't meant to be there. As they say.. "we can change skills levels through training, but we can't change attitude".
     
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  5. redtailshark

    redtailshark Silver Member

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    This sectoral decline isn't only about the service levels and cleanliness of the Sheraton Princess.

    The state-level visitor statistics are influenced by other trends that HVB and promotion-focused entities can do nothing about. For instance:

    1. The near two-decade long Japanese economic stagnation.
    2. The inevitable change in destination image - Hawaii has become a fuddy-duddy place for one's ryoshin. It is no longer a happening hip place, like "Powerful Asia" as HIS Travel markets their consolidator destinations. Even Magnum PI knows that.... younger Japanese want to visit Oz, NZ to snowboard, China to see cultural relics. Hawaii is a hula-tinted curio.

    They can't even capitalize any longer on the market potential of the sector described by Kelsky's informants (1994) as "Ieru Kabu."
     
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  6. howtofreetravel

    howtofreetravel Active Member

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    After travelling to japan i realize japanese have high standards of cleaness and service why? because in japan service is very good but i don't think the same would transfer to the states.
     
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  7. WilliamQ

    WilliamQ Gold Member

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    Yes... a lot of clean countries are maintained by ways of deploying armies of workers.
    In Japan... its the whole nation that simply advocates cleanliness.
     
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