Is it feasible to fly from Ireland (Cork, Shannon or Dublin) to London for day?

Discussion in 'Europe' started by iolaire, Apr 14, 2015.  |  Print Topic

  1. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    I'll be in Ireland for a week in May (with my wife and another couple) and just learned that they have no availability for dialysis treatments (until June at the earliest). So I need to make alternate arrangements or cancel the trip.

    So I'm hoping it is be feasible to fly from Cork ORK to London STN, arrive 8 am take the train to the city core (1-1.5 hours), complete a dialysis session (~4.5 hours), head back to the airport (1-1.5 hours), and fly back in the same day at 8:30. On another day I'd fly from Shannon to London and then back to Dublin.

    Does this sound feasible?

    Will I have a wait for UK immigration control at London STN flying from a non-Dublin Airport in Ireland? If so is it long?

    I'll have about 12 hours on the ground and would need about 8 hours total for commuting and treatment, so it seems like I have enough leeway?
     
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  2. HaveMilesWillTravel
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    HaveMilesWillTravel Gold Member

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    I am afraid I don't know the answer to that question. But let's say the answer is yes... what would you do if the outbound flight gets canceled? (MX, lack of crew, weather, ...)
     
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  3. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    There are multiple flights from multiple cities so I'm not to worries about that. I guess if the Icelandic volcano blows and closes down airspace I'd have to try to force treatment in Ireland or take a ferry (and show up a day late).
     
  4. Clemmiez

    Clemmiez Active Member

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    Hi ~ The question about passport control and length of time you'll need most likely lies with your passport - not the airport you are leaving from. If you are non-EU, you may need to go through a longer process. But pretty much everyone has to show passports as you are flying from one country to another.
    https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100531025617AAC4GQ0 this is a little old, but pretty much explains it.

    This link looks far more detailed - and it's current - but you'll have to search around it for answers. http://ec.europa.eu/immigration/tab3.do?subSec=16

    The other suggestion I have - and probably the most efficient is to call a British consular office here in the US and see what they say. Good luck!

    PS - You may or may not be aware that Ireland is not part of England and the UK. If you are, good. If not please keep reading:

    The Republic of Ireland is an independent country. Northern Ireland is also a separate country; not just a geographic region of the island that Dublin, Cork, Shannon and the rest of the Republic is on. NI is part of the UK. Belfast is its capital. If you drove from Dublin (capital of the Republic) to Belfast you would have to exchange your money as the UK uses Sterling and the Republic of Ireland (not being in the UK) is on the Euro. Ditto obviously when you go to England. But still, even if you flew from Belfast to London, you'd have to go through some sort of passport control. Just quicker more likely if you're an Irish, British or other EU national.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_War_of_Independence

    (PS, I'm an American who lived in Dublin but I also hold an EU passport as well. So yes, it's easier to go from one counry to the next within Europe on the EU passport, but I always exit and enter the US on the American one - cause those are the rules)
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2015
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  5. Clemmiez

    Clemmiez Active Member

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    PPS - Since you'll be in Ireland and it's an easy drive (or bus or train) to Northern Ireland - have you checked if it's possible to get treatment in Belfast, Londonderry (which people in the Republic call "Derry") or Enniskillen? The distances are remarkably small compared to the US and way shorter time and moneywise than flying to London.... https://www.google.com/webhp?source...-8#newwindow=1&q=dublin+to+belfast+drive+time
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2015
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  6. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    I thought about that but after the surprise with Ireland and only three weeks left to plan I wanted to look for space somewhere with LOTS of dialysis centers so I offered London or Paris to my coordinator and she suggested looking at London since Paris usually wants four months notice.

    Originally I planned on using the BA short haul awards on either BA or Aer Lingus. But they didn't have availably one day so I'm now looking at Ryan Air since they have frequent non-stops into non Heathrow airports. And the round trip is around $100 where flying with BA on points is about $60.
     
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  7. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    I guess my big question is if I arrive on a flight at London STN from Cork ORK am I looking at huge multiple hour immigration queues or is just a quick document check?

    For example if I was to land in Miami in the US from the British Virgin Islands I would need to plan for a few hours to exit the airport. I'm expecting that in London I don't need to plan for that.
     
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  8. mattsteg
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    mattsteg Gold Member

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  9. Clemmiez

    Clemmiez Active Member

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    Don't really understand the comparison. Clearing immigration in a timely manner - no matter where you land, except perhaps in a very small airport in a non-major city - also depends on how many in-coming international flights have landed before you. I remember meeting 2 friends (one flying in from Seattle, one from Toronto) in Nassau, Bahamas. I was coming in from Los Angeles. We coordinated times so we would all land within a two hour window. The time difference it took to clear customs was wildly varried because of the amount of other planes that had just off-loaded. Can't give you any advise on Ryan Air as I haven't flown them in a decade. But basically reviews say they don't have a great on-time record, charge up the wazoo for even a soda and blah, blah blah. But then again, it's only a 45 minute flight. You know your health options I'm sure - but I would really try and check if it's possible to get service in Belfast, NI. After all, it is part of the UK and on the British health system - so their availabilty (or lack of it) has nothing to do with Ireland. And you wouldn't have to spend hours in airports and trains to get into to London. Not sure why you're avoiding Heathrow. Yes, it's bloody huge, but it's the closest airport to the city. But if you do have to fly to England, then take trains - probably best to book on line ahead of time as it can get expensive at the last minute. For the London underground (subway) you will need an Oyster card (which is their metro card) http://www.tfl.gov.uk/travel-information/visiting-london/visitor-oyster-card. All the best!
     
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  10. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    Thanks for your feedback.

    I guess I still don't understand if there is even immigration and queues to deal with (when flying from Ireland), when I read all the links it talks about having ID, but it doesn't say anything about customs screening, duty free and the like. Is the non Dublin Ireland to London immigration the same as say a flight from Tokyo to London?

    FYI: I'm not trying to stay away from Heathrow, there is no BA award space on the first day and Ryan Air is flying into Stansted so that is what I'm planning for.

    Had I had more time to plan I would have looked at Northern Ireland, but given we have under three weeks until I needed treatment I focused on the closest city with many centers, including private centers. Since its basically three hours to Dublin or Belfast from the west coast of Ireland it seemed to me that flying was comparable and opened up many dialysis centers.

    Thanks for your feedback.
     
  11. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    Also I should say I appreciate the feedback. It does sound like the airport experience could slow me down. In that light I feel good that I should have 12 hours on the ground. That allows me to allocate three or so hours to get from the airport to the city and still have a good bit of time to spare. I hope that is reasonable.
     
  12. Clemmiez

    Clemmiez Active Member

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    Yes, that's probably a reasonable amount of time and hope it won't be too exhausting a day for you. I honestly don't know how long it will be at the arriving airport. Or how long the lines might be. However, you are going from an EU country to another EU country. And these two are sort of joined at the hip as people from Ireland, NI, and London frequently go back and forth. However, you may be slowed down a little because you have a US passport. Maybe not, I honestly can't remember as it's been a while (and I have an EU passprt as well as US). But rest assured that whatever check points you will have to go through will definitely be faster and less complicated than say a Tokyo to London flight. Or any other non-EU flight to London (USA included). Not sure what you mean by "non Dublin Ireland to London".... it will be the same situation from any airport in Ireland into England. All the best!
     
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  13. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    Somewhere I read that the UK treats Dublin flights as domestic and non Dublin flights differently.
     
  14. Clemmiez

    Clemmiez Active Member

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    That really doesn't make sense to me. It's like saying New York to Toronto is domestic but Washington DC or LA to Toronto wouldn't be. Perhaps they meant Belfast? Belfast is in NI which is part of the UK as is England. Dublin and the Republic of Ireland are not. But when you get there, please find out and let me know -:) Thanks!
     
  15. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    I swore I read it somewhere but of course I could not find it, this is an interesting post:
    http://travel.stackexchange.com/que...rol-flying-from-dublin-dub-to-london-southend
    At Southend he did not go through immigration but his friend did have to go through a "entering from Dublin" immigration line..

    Also this PDF re Student travel indicates that you might not clear immigration so as a student needing a student visa you should not enter via Ireland because the lack of immigration might prevent you from getting student visa:
    http://international.ulster.ac.uk/documents/pre-arrival-booklet-14.pdf
    Entering the UK from the Republic of Ireland
    Although Northern Ireland is located on the island of Ireland, it is part of the United Kingdom and subject to UK immigration regulations. The Republic of Ireland is a separate country for immigration purposes. A visa to enter the UK will not give you permission to enter the Republic of Ireland. Likewise, a visa to enter the Republic of Ireland will not give you permission to enter the UK.
    If you are a non-EEA or Swiss national and you want to travel to Ireland on your way to the University of Ulster, you must obtain a UK Tier 4 Student visa or Student visitor visa before entering Ireland. The reasons for this are that:
    • you will probably not see any immigration officers when you enter Northern Ireland (UK) from Ireland, so you will not be able to apply for immigration permission to the enter the UK.
    • if you do not get immigration permission when you enter the UK, and you are not a visa national, you will in most cases automatically have permission to be in the UK for a maximum of three months, but you will not be allowed to work and you will not be able to extend your stay in the UK as a student or student visitor beyond three months.

    To avoid difficulties with immigration, we do not recommend that you enter the UK from Ireland if you are a non-EEA or Swiss national.
     
  16. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    FYI in the end we found space at a private facility in Dublin that reported no space in early April.
     
  17. Clemmiez

    Clemmiez Active Member

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    Glad to hear -:) Hope you're enjoying your visit!
     
  18. iolaire
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    iolaire Gold Member

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    To get dialysis I commuted to Dublin from Limerick via train and back to Galway on the bus on Wednesday. I took the city bus to the dialysis center in the suburbs.

    I was happy that I didn’t miss my bus stop despite the cellular service from “Three Ireland” that completely conked out in Dublin. (Later I purchased a “Lycamobile Ireland” SIM card that worked MUCH better.) From what we could tell “Three Ireland” is not a good option despite some recommendations online and the €20 unlimited plan…. “Lycamobile Ireland” worked much better under more limited €10 plan. My friend with a newer Galaxy 6 had better “Three Ireland” service for voice and texts, but not for data.
     

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