How to use a concierge

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Travel' started by sobore, Jul 8, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    http://travel.usatoday.com/hotels/story/2011/07/How-to-use-a-concierge/49190596/1

    From checked baggage fees to other add-ons, travelers are nickeled-and-dimed more these days. But one thing that remains free is consulting a hotel concierge.

    Usually located behind a desk at upscale properties, the concierge is there exclusively to serve guests.More than 50% take advantage of the service, according to a survey of concierges at a recent International Les Clefs d'Or (translation: "gold keys") meeting in Toronto, says Regena Falling, president of the U.S. branch of the prestigious association of hotel concierges. (You can tell Clefs d'Or members by the pin with crossed gold keys they wear.)

    In cities such as L.A. and New York— which offer an overwhelming menu of options for visitors — about 70% of hotel guests use a concierge, the survey found. But many never ask concierges about where to dine, which show to see, what museum exhibit to visit. Or they don't go over the top and have a suit tailored for their dog, as concierge Frank Laino of The Stafford London did for a guest.
     
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  2. sparxe
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    sparxe Silver Member

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    I like to do my own research on restaurants. The last time I asked a concierge for a restaurant suggestion, we ended up at a place that was about double the average price that the concierge said it would be. It was such a big difference, it made us wonder if they were getting kickbacks. This was in Chicago.
     
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  3. Len Williams
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    Len Williams Silver Member

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    I hope it remains a high priority for hotels. The concierge is an invaluable resource to someone who is not familiar with the area.
     
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  4. Clocktower
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    Clocktower Silver Member

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    This is why I'd never use one for restaurants.. even if there weren't kickbacks involved, my suspicious nature would get the get the better of me!

    I've found them very useful for odd things, though, like "where's the closest place that sells wrapping paper", etc.
     

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