How to Score the Best Hotel Upgrades

Discussion in 'General Discussion | Miles/Points' started by gleff, Jun 4, 2011.  |  Print Topic

  1. gleff
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    gleff Co-founder

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    I posted this to my blog, but it actually started as a reply in another thread here on Milepoint.

    I thought it would be useful to bring it back here for some discussion, since it's less about specific upgrades with particular chains but more about upgrades generally and the various times and techniques for obtaining them, including for obtaining the better suites and not just the entry-level ones.

    And I'd love to see this as a work in progress rather than a definitive tone, would love to learn more because one of my great joys in travel is exceptional suites, I'm always in search of the next great room at an amazing property :) .

    Back in 2005 I offered up some recommendations, the upshot of which was to find a way to just ask (without being a jerk).

    I think I’m a bit more experienced now than I was then, and can offer some additional insight, hopefully some of it is new or will spark some idea about how to go about it. The crux of the advice from back in 2005 remains, though. There are a lot of guests in a hotel, many of which have some sort of status, and some get the upgrade and some don’t, some get the ‘special’ suites while others get the more mundane ones. And there are things that you can do to distinguish yourself, and it usually does have more to do with your mojo and strategy than about who you are in a hotel’s program (super-secret special hotel levels notwithstanding). That’s one of the interesting things about hotels versus airlines, where the advice commonly given about how you dress or whom to ask for an upgrade is almost always wrong. With a hotel it can actually work out.

    Elite upgrades aren’t all created equal.

    Let’s not over estimate the importance of ‘technique’, because hotel elite status obviously matters a lot. It’s the excuse to askand ticket in the door. But lots of people have status. And not all programs are created equal; Marriott, Hilton HHonors, and Priority Club don’t even include upgrades to suites as a published feature of their programs.

    Hyatt will let their Diamond members confirm a suite at booking four times a year, but it’s not usually going to be one of the monster or ‘named’ suites.
    Starwood’s upgrade program technically only extends to ‘standard’ suites.
    The one program that I’ve found can be useful in getting the really high-end suites, and whose hotels often have them, is Intercontinental’s Royal Ambassador.

    Here’s the Ambassador suite at the Intercontinental Singapore which I had back in February, booked a much more affordable room using the friends and family rate and they provided their standard ‘two category upgrade’ which they don’t “cap” (some hotels won’t upgrade beyond a certain level regardless of the room you book). I emailed the hotel ahead of time to ask their upgrade policy and they responded with a grid showing me what I needed to book in order to get a particular room type.

    Here’s one of my bookings in the Presidential Suite at the Intercontinental Manila, that was secured also using the friends and family rate, I think it was $175++. Here’s the living room (which also finished a baby grand piano).
    [​IMG]
    I’ve also had exceptional upgrades to the Jimbaran Bay Suite at the Intercontinental Bali, the Diplomatic Suite at the Intercontinental Bangkok, and a Terrace Suite at the Mark Hopkins in San Francisco to name just a few.

    In all of the above cases, I contacted the hotel ahead of time to strategize my upgrade, and all were secured with a very reasonable rate booking (the Intercontinental Bangkok using a buy one get on free weekend night, back when you could use those to book a suite).

    Of course, you don’t always want a monster suite, and a standard elite upgrade will do. Choosing your property matters a great deal. Some are just excellent at delivering the upgrades, such as the Westin Diplomatwhich has something like 86 suites in the upgrade pool and except for the week between Christmas and New Years will almost always deliver Starwood Platinum members a corner suite with wraparound balcony overlooking the ocean (and in some cases, also the intracoastal waterway).

    Most Starwood properties in Asia will try to upgrade you, many in the US just don’t have enough suites to go around to all of their top level elites. Knowing which properties are good for elite upgrades is important if those upgrades are important to you. For instance, you’ll have massive competition at the Westin Maui, it’s a good property for what it is but Platinum status will only go so far there.

    I had booked an odd mistake package deal that included the Fairmont Royal York about a year ago, and asked Fairmont for a status match. Now, I knew they didn’t dostatus matches generally, but that they usually replied to such requests with a confirmed suite upgrade certificate. Which they did in my case, and I used it on that stay. So there’s a different sort of example of leveraging a loyalty program for a suite… Confirmed suites are one of the things I do like about the Fairmont program.

    Book through the right channels

    Where you book matters and I don’t mean like the Expedia commercial. If you’ve got an American Express Platinum or Centurion card,
    Consider checking the Fine Hotels & Resorts rate at a property which will generally include an upgrade, breakfast, and an additional amenity. Centurion members can do even better, with an additional amenity beyond what’s shown for Platinum members like a folio credit.

    Similar deals can usually be obtained by booking a property through a Virtuoso agent, so an Amex card isn’t really required.

    Now, booking channel isn’t the only thing that determines your upgrade of course though the right booking channel can give you leverage or an opening for negotiating with the property. They’re supposed to try to give you an upgrade anyway, so might as well try for the best one possible. And you’re part of an overall relationship that they value.

    On the other hand, I’ve been upgraded even on Priceline reservations, usually when the hotel winds up oversold and I’m checking in late, all of the standard rooms have already been assigned and they need to upgrade someone. Of course, that’s a situation when you also risk being walked to another property, you’re a no-name guest where they’re less concerned about the relationship. Booking through Priceline doesn’t help you get upgraded, I’m just saying it does happen.

    In fact, if you aren’t booking through a preferred channel that pre-negotiates upgrades like Amex Fine Hotels and Resorts or Virtuoso, it’s generally best to book through a hotel website directly at least compared to online booking channels like Expedia or Hotels.com where the property canbe paying 20% or even (for a small, non-chain hotel) 40% of the room revenue to the booking service. Not that Expedia guests get the bad rooms mind you but there’s a reason that hotel chains like Starwood won’t even give points for those reservations let alone elite benefits, from the top on down there’s a mindset — which may or may not permeate to the particular hotel and down to the hotel’s front desk staff — that devalues those reservations due to their high costs.

    Negotiating in advance

    Upgrades can be arranged through correspondence with a manager.. GM, reservations manager, revenue manager, etc.

    Before I had any sort of hotel status, I would often send a fax to the hotel with some request about my stay. Perhaps it was a special occasion, and could they give me the view I was looking forward to? I might have flowers delivered to the room so that they’re there when we arrive, that would force the hotel to pre-block a room, and while they were thus hand-selecting a room it would tend to be better than if left to the check-in desk. And I would send a fax rather than making a phone call usually on the theory that a piece of paper could be picked up and taken as an action item, whereas a person that I got on the phone might well forget to do anything I had asked.

    Now, and with status, things are still quite negotiable. At the Sheraton Saigon I offered to spend points to get a Towers room. I had booked an award stay, and the hotel doesn’t upgrade from the main rooms to the Towers section as a status benefit. But they agreed to move me offer for points, confirmed in advance rather than an instant award at check-in, and then confirm my elite upgrade to a suite in the Towers section at the same time.

    As mentioned, with Intercontinental properties given their widely varying upgrade procedures, I almost always email in advance. Whenever I care what type of room I’ll get, I want to know what type of room to book in order to get it. Frequently Intercontinentals will confirm upgrades in advance for Royal Ambassador members (that status being earned based on unpublished criteria, roughly 50-60 Priority Club nights and at least 3 different Intercontinental properties, but members who earn it can also refer a friend to it for a year).

    Negotiating at Check-in

    Various hotels give varying levels of discretion to front desk staff, Randy Petersen was quoted years ago in the New York Times suggesting walking up to the counter and saying something like, “By any chance, is that big presidential suite available? I just feel important tonight,” and it doesn’t hurt to ask, even jokingly, once in a blue moon it might work.

    Sometimes it means ‘pushing’ at the check-in counter. When I arrived at the former Westin Rio Mar at 4pm, my pre-blocked junior suite wasn’t ready. They suggested I go have a drink or a late lunch and wait. I asked whether they were buying me lunch? Or if they’d like to find me a better room that was ready? The front office manager came over, typed a bit, and put me into an Atlantic Suite.

    It can also mean just expressing disappointment once you get up to the room, returning to the front desk and asking the hotel to do better, Lucky had an interesting (and successful) experience with this recently.

    Similarly, I mentioned my disappointment at the location of my suite at the Intercontinental Montelucia (ground floor, right next to the pool) and they moved me to a much larger suite… with its own back yard.
    [​IMG]
    Now, In Las Vegas, “negotiating” means “tipping.”

    On a 4-night stay at the Bellagio, a $100 bill at the check-in yielded a suite with 5 bathrooms.

    I slipped the $100 under my credit card, and asked “I was wondering if there are any upgrades available, I’d love one of those great big penthouse suites.” The desk clerk typed away, took my credit card and stuck the $100 in her pocket, and told me that I’d enjoy my room very much (but that if I had any concerns, to please come back and speak with her and not anyone else.)

    She had called me over from another line to help, I had been specifically avoiding her because conventional wisdom is that male clerks are more likely to respond favorably to the tip at check-in, and also because her line was directly next to where the manager on duty was standing. That didn’t concern her a bit, I assumed she was ‘kicking up’ and have written some posts in the past on the economics of tipping in travel and why hotels in Vegas in particular allow the practice to continue.

    Mistake rates

    I often prefer hotel mistake rates over airline ones, in fact I’ll usually eschew booking airfare glitches that don’t allow me to originate in my home city or that are non-upgradable coach. And I’ve rarely seen mistakes in true international first class. There are also far fewer airfare mistakes, at least of the sort of ‘jumbos’ that used to come around regularly, but hotels still do make pricing errors and sometimes choose to honor them.

    My all-time favorite had to be the Le Meridien Khao Lak’s Ugandan Schillings rate which got me into their two-bedrooom oceanfront residence.

    A couple of years ago I booked the W San Diego’s Extreme Wow Suite for the price of a deeply discounted regular room.
    [​IMG]
    I’ve also missed out on plenty, I didn’t bother booking the Presidential Suite at the Conrad Bangkok (would have been great to pair with the Khao Lak villa!) because I had just gotten back from bangkok the week it was published…

    Other suggestions?

    The overall best technique varies by hotel and by chain, and it pays to investigate others’ experiences in advance. Kind of upgrades have y’all received and how have you gotten them?
     
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  2. SirRagnar
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    SirRagnar Silver Member

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    Thanks for all the good tips. I personally have only tried for upgrades at check-in. The only chain in which I have a elite tier worth anything is SPG where I'm gold.
    Usually I am upgraded without asking, but occasionally I have to ask. Many of the upgrades are to the SPG Preferred floor only, which isn't much of a real upgrade.
    However, I have been lucky getting some nice rooms as well. For instance at Le Meridien at Mauritius where the misses and I stayed on a 4 nights on Points and Cash stay and were upgraded to the Royal Suite after simply asking if there was any chance of an upgrade. They did not seem very accustomed to see SPG Gold customers (one waiter thought I was working for a different Starwood hotel since she could see the status when billing us), I was treated extremely well for the entire duration. We ended up taking extending with an extra night at that hotel due to the upgrade.

    I will try some of your tips for future stay, but I am not comfortable with your Vegas 'tipping' trick so I'll not try that one. Where I come from that would be considered bribe more than tip, but I guess it's different in Vegas :)
     
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  3. PedroNY
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    PedroNY Silver Member

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    Gary, thank you very much for this informative post, it is packed with great information. As you eloquently say is that you will not always hit a home run, but a single here and a double there will definitely get you better rooms than what was booked. I personally always send out an email to general manager about 6 or 7 days out, usually we get an upgrade a level or two above booked room, not sure if it is due to the status with Hilton or SPG, or just the email mentioning the special occassion -- it does usually work!

    Cheers,

    PedroNY
     
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  4. wombat18
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    wombat18 Silver Member

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    No, I think you are right. It is a bribe. They are very common in countries with a lot of corruption.
     
  5. Lighthouse
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    Lighthouse Gold Member

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    Gleff, as always it is a very helpful and thorough discussion. I am still very intrigued about better understanding who are the key staff in the hotel who make the day to day room assignment decisions (i.e. General Manager, front office manager, etc.) We would like to better cultivate our relationships with key personnel in some of our favorite hotels. PedroNY's comments would seem to suggest that there is pretty wide discretion at a number of different levels. But I would be interested in understanding who has the most day to day leverage on these decisions on a consistent basis.
     
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  6. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    Interesting and timely thread. I'm sitting in a Marvelous (corner, high floor) suite right now in the W New York (on Lex) on a cheap rate for a Cozy Queen that I found on spg,com. I told a few people earlier today how I got it, but I'll post that later.

    This topic will give me something interesting to think about on the plane ride home. I'm already smiling to think about some of the special suites I've scored in various places.
     
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  7. cennas
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    cennas Gold Member

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    Thanks for the tips, very informative indeed.
     
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  8. SirRagnar
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    SirRagnar Silver Member

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    Enlighten us, please - I have a 3 day stay in NYC coming and could surely use a good deal :)
     
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  9. Steven Schwartz
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    Steven Schwartz Gold Member

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    We never met, Gary, but I certainly fee I know you! Your tips are right on - sometimes you have to ask for what you are "entitled" to. But there are, in fact, strategies and not many people share them so openly. Many thanks!
     
  10. Million Mile Secrets

    Million Mile Secrets Silver Member

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    I've always got my room when I've arrived at the hotel (because I usually always arrive in the late evening or night), but am itching to ask if they will buy me lunch or find me a better room if I arrive at a hotel when the room is not ready!
     
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  11. emajy
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    emajy Silver Member

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    I recently was bumped at the Hyatt Penn's Landing. I arrived late and there were no rooms. I knew something was wrong when the clerk quickly went to get the manager. I got an apology and was told I would be moved downtown. They comped me the room for the night. Then I asked for free parking for the 2 days ($50) and cab fair back and forth as I did not want to move my car. The manager just reached into the drawer and handed me $30 in cash and told me the fare would be about $10 each way. I also asked for an upgraded room when I came back the next day. I got a room over looking the Delaware River and a great view of the Battleship NJ. They sent up a bottle of water and fruit plate with an apology letter. But before I asked, the manager said I see your Hyatt Gold and added 12k points to my account. So the it never hurts to ask for more. Worst case they say No!
     
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  12. Steven Schwartz
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    Steven Schwartz Gold Member

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    But I assume you asked politely and didn't act arrogant and pissy. If that's right, that's how most of us would have also treated you!
     
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  13. mrsmortis
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    mrsmortis Silver Member

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    It helps to stay in the same place reguarly and to learn the staff's names. I always get a decent upgrade at the Hilton in Milan, but I've made Diamond this year just on my stays there! The fact that my 2 year old daughter is blonde and personable helps too. I always get the best upgrades on the weeks she and my husband are staying with me.
     
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  14. JohnDeere19
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    JohnDeere19 Gold Member

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    Wow they really stepped it up for you. Not surprising though as it seems it was clearly the hotels fault. Another great example of if you don't ask, the answer is always no.
     
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  15. emajy
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    emajy Silver Member

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    I stated to get a little upset but no matter what I was not staying at the Hyatt I was booked in that night. So I just went with it and became very accommodating. It worked out well this time.:)
     
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  16. MSPeconomist
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    MSPeconomist Gold Member

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    OK, here's the story.

    When I checked in Friday afternoon on my cheap spg.com rate for a cozy queen (very small, their lowest room category), they gave me a minor upgrade to a king bedded room that wasn't much bigger than the bed. A few hours later, someone called me to ask how the room was and I said that I was disappointed in the room and the lack of a better Plat upgrade. The person said that I could switch the next day if I wanted. Since I would be away from about 9:15 am to 10:00 pm or later, I would need to pack up in the morning. I did so, which required getting up a bit earlier than I otherwise would have. On my way out, when I told the front desk that my luggage was ready to be moved anytime, the front desk person knew nothing about my room change, which was to have been to a much better room but still not a suite. I told the front desk person the name of the staff member who had called me and roughly the time of the call. I also said that since I had gotten up early to pack, I would be extremely upset if they did not give me a better room.

    The front desk person called the manager on duty and repeated my "she'll be extremely upset" comment. I waited for the manager (who IIRC was the hotel's controller) to appear and he said that I would be moved to a Marvelous suite, would that be OK? Of course I said yes and I later verified that it's not the base suite in this property. Hence, I would assume that it's not considered a select standard suite, the category that Plats are entitled to if available.

    BTW, I noticed something this weekend about the pricing of SPG properties in NYC. When I first booked the W New York (on Lex), the rate type (not room category) that I wanted wasn't available and I was forced to pick a higher rate type. The day before my arrival, I noticed that the rate type I had wanted was being offered again. I called the Plat concierge and had it switched, saving me more than $100 including tax for two nights (although there was an error in the second night's rate that needed to be corrected when I checked out). Then I noticed that the AAA rate offered by the Sheraton Tribeca fell by a lot, probably more than $100 for Sunday night, to less that the best (even nonrefundable) rate that was offered when I booked, probably about a month in advance. So I would strongly advise you to watch the rates and check shortly before your trip if you are not using a nonrefundable rate.
     
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  17. ranman1973

    ranman1973 Silver Member

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    I've tried the $20 Vegas trick once and it worked well. I wanted a room with a view of the Strip and received a standard room but an amazing view up on the 34th floor of TI. I also upgraded with a $40 tip at Flamingo and received a suite upgrade (3 rooms).

    I have also just 'asked' for an upgrade, most recently, at the Marriott Marquis in San Francisco. I received a nice suite with a great view of the Mascone Center and Yerba Buena Gardens.
     
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  18. Lighthouse
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    Lighthouse Gold Member

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    Gleff,
    I am finding that premier status combined with the AMEX FHR program allows me to get one and a half feet in the door with regard to politely requesting a better upgrade. I have never used Virtuoso and am interested in members observations about how that does or does not complement premier status. I would also be interested in members experiences with other services Visa Signature, World Mastercard, etc.
    As you point out with priceline, expedia, hotels.com, etc. some services would appear to detract rather than enhance one's abilities to get a better room, credit in a loyalty program, etc.
    I assume that all of these third party programs take a percentage of the hotels revenues but some seem to enhance one's prospects while others harm one's prospects. I am interested in understanding which really bolster one's opportunities and with which hotel groups?
     
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  19. pearl girl
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    pearl girl Silver Member

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    That is interesting how the hotels encourage and honor their loyalty programs with some outside vendors and greatly limit the benefits with others. I assume that must be based off the affluence of the vendors clients? So for example Centurion? I also would be very interested in knowing which outside vendors give you the best complementary benefits.
     
  20. sobore
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    sobore Gold Member

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    If you have any status, then calling ahead may be the best option for an upgrade. It may take a few moments of your time, but speaking to the manager prior to arrival may yield the best results. At least asking someone to put a note on your reservation “Gold member requesting upgrade” may help.
    If you fail to plan ahead then your upgrade may be left up to the front desk clerk who is busy doing their homework and not too familiar with the hotels loyalty program.
     
  21. iterfacio12

    iterfacio12 Silver Member

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    Wow, great post. It actually contained a massive amount of useful and practical advice that I'll certainly try to utilize. And I'll give you an update on what upgrades I receive when I head over to IC Bali Resort in a month.
     
  22. Boraxo

    Boraxo Silver Member

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    I now have status in most chains but never get suite upgrades. I have tried emailing in advance and asking at the front desk. I usually end up with a decent room but never suites. When I ask about better rooms at checkin the standard response is "this is the best we have." Now if I complain about location they usually have no trouble finding me a better location but it is usually the exact same room type. This experience has now soured me on Marriott and IC to the point that I am unlikely to go out of my way to renew status in these programs. It sounds like top level elites have better experience at IC, Hyatt and SPG but it is simply not possible for me to achieve that status as I don't stay frequently enough in those chains (lack of properties) and there are no alternative means of purchasing status as there is for Marriott and Hilton.

    Am I not being aggressive enough? Should I be calling the front desk manager a couple of days before my stay? Should I be asking if suites are available at checkin and then ask for one to be comp'd?
     
  23. Jimgotkp
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    Jimgotkp Gold Member

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    Suites might be all fully committed for on the nights that you are there. There are some hotels that don't want to release any suites for free if they know that they can sell it. Of course you can be "entitled" to an upgrade because of your status but for the most part upgrades to suites are at the discretion of the hotel. When it comes to the large suites, the FD staff try to not give that out for free. This is coming from a guy who worked the Front Desk at multiple hotels. :)

    It's also risky to tip your FD agent in Vegas. The FD agents don't give anything to their managers even though they know it's going on. There are certain hotels in Vegas that run off tips such as TI where one of my colleagues worked at. He said as long as you have a $20 bill out you can get early check-in, upgrades, etc. The higher the tip, the better the room according to him. Since I worked at another property, I can tell you that we run totally different but still accept tips at the end of the transaction ;)
     
  24. Boraxo

    Boraxo Silver Member

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    No kidding! But you can understand my confusion as gleff seems to find suites dropping like plums in the summer and my experience has been quite different. So I am just trying to improve my batting average - maybe you have some tips seeing as you've worked in the industry...
     
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  25. IkeEsq

    IkeEsq Gold Member

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    I know noting about you so please don't take offense, but it may simply be a matter of how you present yourself at check-in. As a gold at Hilton I have regularly received room upgrades, not usually suites but to some much nicer rooms. I have had a lot of luck the last year or so at Club Carlson properties and elsewhere as well. Chatting up the FD, making jokes, letting slip a bit about the rough flight your were just on, etc. can give you a more personal connection that will help. Asking, even jokingly, about the availability of X can get you just that. Coming in with a sense of entitlement tends to be a real turnoff and is unlikely to get you what you want.

    We almost always arrive at hotels before noon and often our room(s) is not ready but they can frequently find us something or upgrade us. I have ended up in the corner King rooms at the Millennium Hilton on a number of occasions, the most recent when we came back around 1:00 p.m. with my son draped over a shoulder barely conscious and I gave the guy a "help" sort of look. Of course, once we got to the room and my son could look down several dozen floors at the construction on the World Trade Center site there was no napping to be had. :)

    How far in advance could one reasonably contact the hotel? I know for things like OWS in Bora Bora or the Maldives people have arranged things long in advance but is the same true here or is a week or so before better?
     

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