How the LAX shooting could change the status of TSA officers

Discussion in 'Travel Security' started by sobore, Dec 28, 2013.  |  Print Topic

  1. sobore
    Original Member

    sobore Gold Member

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    http://www.scpr.org/news/2013/12/26/41196/how-the-lax-shooting-could-change-the-status-of-th/

    As air travelers, we all love to gripe about the Transportation Security Administration over the constant barking in airport security lines to take out laptops and empty our pockets, the inconvenient 3-ounce liquid rule and, of course, those body scanners and pat-downs.

    But when a shooter aimed an AR-15 at TSA officers at Los Angeles International Airport on Nov. 1, the resentment at the TSA quieted as colleagues, families and the public mourned the loss of a father and husband who wore a blue TSA shirt for the job.

    TSA officer Gerardo Hernandez became the first TSA worker killed on the job in a violent attack that singled out the agency he worked for.

    “The reality is that it took something like this for people to understand the risks we face,” said local TSA union president Victor Payes.

    Payes said that, after the shooting, passengers offered condolences and were more patient during the cumbersome security procedures at checkpoints.

    Airline passenger Patti De La Casas told KPCC that she now tries to be calm and friendly with TSA workers at the airport. She said she feels for them.

    "I don’t think they probably get paid a whole lot more than people putting themselves in danger’s way but they have to carry the responsibility," De La Casas said.

    Some of passenger patience and sympathy has worn off in the weeks since the tragedy, many TSA workers say. But the discussion over what role TSA officials play at airports and for the traveling public continues.


    Read More: http://www.scpr.org/news/2013/12/26/41196/how-the-lax-shooting-could-change-the-status-of-th/
     
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  2. newbluesea
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    newbluesea Gold Member

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    While we all sympathize with the family and friends of the worker killed its always interesting ( with a good deal of skepticism, at least on my part) when I encounter
    a pretty useless article like this.:rolleyes:
    Exactly what dangers do TSA personnel face that's any different from all other workers in any public service positions ?
    To the contrary considering the large number of TSA workers and only one so far killed on the job.. one could actually reach the conclusion that its probably one of the safest occupations in the country.

    I wager that far more postal workers, hotel front desk clerks or even clergy ( take your pick ) have been killed on the job even when the percentages are taken into consideration
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2013
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  3. gaijin62

    gaijin62 Gold Member

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    TSA was formed in 2001 and has been doing airport screenings since about that time. In 12 years only 1 person has been killed at a screening check point and all of a sudden TSA agents need to be trained and armed?

    "At this time, we feel a larger and more consistent armed presence in screening areas would be a positive step in improving security for both TSOs and the flying public,” David Cox.

    If by improved security he means, more intimidated, then I guess so.

    Kip Hawley is right in this (I think), there is a lot of security state mission creep being proposed and carried out.

    Lastly, as an outside observer, I find it disturbing that the answer to gun violence in America is: more guns.
     
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  4. Sammich

    Sammich Gold Member

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    How about no on the increased armed presence? Unfortunately, equipping firearms on TSA officers won't prevent an incident like this from happening. I'm not saying that increased armed presence is completely a bad thing. But TSA has a lot of other issues to work out before blindly suggesting that equipping firearms will solve everything.

    I don't spend a lot of time at American airports. But in Asian airports I see a lot of the security is done by special forces instead of screening officers. There seems to be quite a few of them patrolling at the same time at HKG. Last time I visited LAX I didn't even see any armed officers walking around.
     
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  5. Captain Oveur
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    Captain Oveur Gold Member

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    Yeah, the same people who are bright enough to pepper spray themselves and five co-workers is exactly the kind of people you want to be armed.

    The BS about arming them has mostly been coming from their Union. Read something on Twitter not long after the incident when someone in DC, might have been AG Holder, saying "not a chance" to screeners being armed.

    In my personal opinion, in what I have seen and heard in the media in the couple of weeks after the incident, the TSA has come very close to being shameless in milking this murder for sympathy and spin.
     
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  6. Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt Silver Member

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    That was horribly tragic, and I feel that ALL of the details have probably not be released.

    What's next - I have to declare my AR at the TSA station... ?

    It will be interesting to get the full details, and I feel that they will be available, but never on the "evening news." Sort of like the LA bank robbery incident in 1997 - so many mistakes, at so many levels, and again, with horribly tragic results. Almost everyone did everything wrong, and the result was horrifying.

    I keep waiting for "the other shoe" to drop, regarding air travelers.
     
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  7. Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt Silver Member

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    With the rapid turnover at TSA, the lack of proper training, and especially with firearms, arming them would be a horrible mistake. Many are "wannabe cops," who cannot go through academy, and the rest are signed up, looking only to retirement from a US Gov agency, they are the last folk, who I want to see armed.

    Now, a trained military, or police presence would not be bad. We have seen such in many international airports - but there is a lot of training behind those officers.

    Heck, we were in Rome, at the same time as NATO, and the World Banking Conference, plus a visit from a delegation from the Congo. It looked like trying to get into Harvey Point. As each delegate left each meeting, the Via de Ventura looked like "Armed Forces Day" in the US, with attack helicopters, armored vehicles, and hundreds of heavily armed forces. Such is life.
     
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  8. Captain Oveur
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    Captain Oveur Gold Member

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    All the details likely haven't been released because that's the norm for cases that have yet to be adjudicated in the courts. If the accused pleads guilty, then after the sentencing we'll hear about it. As it stands now, we'll have to wait until the evidence is heard.
     

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